Friday, January 04, 2019

There is an ongoing debate in combat sports as to whether it's reasonable to call a grappling or BJJ bout a fight, or if the term fight should be reserved exclusively for MMA.

UFC commentator and BJJ black belt Joe Rogan voiced the prevailing opinion in the MMA community, on the

“Jiu-jitsu is not fighting because you’re not hitting each other,” said Rogan, as transcribed by Jiu-Jitsu Times. "So, you’ve got a jiu-jitsu match, for sure. Not really a fight because you can’t get leg kicked, you can’t get elbowed in the face, you’re not going to get kneed into a coma, it’s a totally different experience than a fight, and it’s almost disrespectful, in some ways, to call a jiu-jitsu match a fight. But other people like to refer to it as a fight. There’s nothing wrong with that."

Strongly in the there's-nothing-wrong-with-that camp is multiple time IBJJF World No-Gi Champion and retired MMA fighter Josh Hinger, who made the case on

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Is jiu-jitsu a “fight” or a “match” ... the dumbest argument ever. Metaphors exist everywhere in everyday speech. The basis of this petty little argument is that it is not a fight because there are no punches, no kicks, no strikes of any sort. Yet, there’s no problem with people saying that they had to fight traffic. Or how about when you fight with your parents? Or fight with your spouse? How about fighting a sickness? Are you running around kicking the cars on the freeway? Punching your girlfriend or striking your parents? I bet not. Furthermore, these same people have no problem calling an MMA bout a “war” or a “battle.” I wonder if our combat veterans are offended by the soft ass usage of the words “war” and “battle.” MMA fights literally are not wars. Now if two MMA fighters go at it in the cage and one takes the other down and chokes the other without a single strike being thrown, is it still a fight? Or is it just a match? It’s a fight. Fights are relative. Fights, struggles, bouts, battles, are all relative to the individual. We fight with internal demons (oh look, another metaphor), and that doesn’t mean you are running in circles and punching yourself in the face. Call it what you want. Use which ever word makes you happiest. But when you cry about someone else’s usage of match or fight, really you’re just revealing your own insecurities. As David Goggins once said, people want to put a title (or a label) on you because it makes it easier for them to accept their own limitations. You’re a “fighter” because you punch people. Okay, good for you big fighter person. But so is the 10 year old cancer patient who is FIGHTING for their life. . ••• ••• ••• #atosjiujitsu #bjj #jiujitsu #blackbelt #nogi #worldchampion #habroksports #kingstoncoffeeco #gymjonessalvation #gnarlynutrition #moskova #monkeytape #gogoplata #brazil

A post shared by Josh Hinger (@hingerbjj) on

"Is jiu-jitsu a 'fight' or a 'match'? The dumbest argument ever," argued Hinger. "Metaphors exist everywhere in everyday speech. The basis of this petty little argument is that it is not a fight because there are no punches, no kicks, no strikes of any sort. Yet, there’s no problem with people saying that they had to fight traffic. Or how about when you fight with your parents? Or fight with your spouse? How about fighting a sickness?

"Are you running around kicking the cars on the freeway? Punching your girlfriend or striking your parents? I bet not.

"Furthermore, these same people have no problem calling an MMA bout a 'war' or a 'battle.' I wonder if our combat veterans are offended by the soft ass usage of the words 'war' and 'battle.' MMA fights literally are not wars. Now if two MMA fighters go at it in the cage and one takes the other down and chokes the other without a single strike being thrown, is it still a fight? Or is it just a match? It’s a fight.

"Fights are relative. Fights, struggles, bouts, battles, are all relative to the individual. We fight with internal demons (oh look, another metaphor), and that doesn’t mean you are running in circles and punching yourself in the face.

"Call it what you want. Use whichever word makes you happiest. But when you cry about someone else’s usage of match or fight, really you’re just revealing your own insecurities. As David Goggins once said, people want to put a title (or a label) on you because it makes it easier for them to accept their own limitations. You’re a 'fighter' because you punch people. Okay, good for you big fighter person. But so is the 10-year-old cancer patient who is FIGHTING for their life."

h/t BJJEE