British Columbia AC bans TRT ahead of UFC 174

 

Few dispute that there are legitimate circumstances in which a Therapeutic Use Exemption for Testosterone Replacement Therapy is appropriate. Legitimate cases are however exceedingly rare. For example, MLB has issued six TUEs, over the past six seasons. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency which covers 1000s of athletes, issued one TUE in 2013. At the 2012 London Olympics, the International Olympic Committee issued none.

Due to abuse of TRT, the highly influential Nevada State Athletic Commission abolished TUEs in February. Brazil's Comissão Atlética Brasileira de MMA followed suit within 24 hours.

However, the New Jersey State Athletic Commission, which has an impeccable reputation, is not ready to ban TRT yet, and will continue to follow the Association of Boxing Commissions (ABC) guidelines, which are in turn based on the International Olympic Committee standards.

The California State Athletic Commission under the direction of Executive Director Andy Foster is likewise not planning any changes. California will continue their current policy on TUEs, which is based on those set by the World Anti-Doping Agency.

And the Federally mandated Association of Boxing Commissions under the direction of president Tim Lueckenhoff, plans to review the NSAC stand, but does not plan any changes at this time.

However, the number of ACs with a complete ban increases.

UFC 174: Johnson vs. Bagautinov takes place on June 14, 2014 at Rogers Arena in Vancouver, BC, Canada. It will be regulated by The Office of the BC Athletic Commissioner (BCAC). And the BCAC just banned TUEs for TRT.

Erik Magraken ‏ has the story.

The BC AC has released their long awaited anti Doping Policy and Therapeutic Use Exemption policy for Performance Enhancing Drugs:
BCAC Anti Doping Policy
BCAC TUE Policy

Section 21 of the BC Minister’s Athletic Commissioner regulations adopted the WADA Prohibited List of Substances.  Today’s Policy simply confirms the WADA list is in force in BC.

What was less clear was whether BC would grant Therapeutic Use Exemptions for prohibited substances to those in medical need.  From my perspective it was implied that if BC adopted the WADA prohibited list they also adopted the WADA test for granting a TUE.  Today’s Policy confirms this in fact is the case.  Interestingly, BC has adopted a complete ban on TRT, which could be subject to Human Rights scrutiny under BC law, with the policy reading as follows:

3.2 Therapeutic Use
3.2.1
Athletes with a documented medical condition requiring the use of a Prohibited Substance or a Prohibited Method must first obtain a Therapeutic Use Exception (TUE). The presence of a Prohibited Substance or its Metabolites or Markers, Use or Attempted Use of a Prohibited Substance or a Prohibited Method, Possession of Prohibited Substances or Prohibited Methods or administration of a Prohibited Substance or Prohibited Method 4 consistent with the provisions of an applicable TUE issued pursuant to the WADA International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions shall not be considered an anti-doping policy contravention.
3.2.2
Athletes competing in British Columbia must obtain a TUE from the BCAC (regardless of whether the Athlete previously has received a TUE elsewhere) no later than thirty days before the Athlete’s participation in a competition.
3.2.3
Upon the BCAC’s receipt of a TUE request, the BCAC shall either convene a panel of BCAC ringside physicians to consider and advise on the request (the “TUE Panel”) or refer the TUE request to a body the BCAC believes competent to consider and give advice to the BCAC on TUEs. If the BCAC convenes a panel, the Chair (as appointed by the BCAC) of the TUE Panel shall appoint three (3) members of the TUE Panel (which may include the
Chair) to consider such request. The TUE Panel members (or other competent body as decided by the BCAC) so designated shall promptly evaluate such request in accordance with the International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions and render advice to the BCAC on such request.
3.2.4
The BCAC will not grant a TUE request for the use of testosterone

Read entire article...

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tags: regulation   TRT   TUE   PED   BC   British Columbia   UFC 174   



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Recent Comments »

ErikMagraken site profile image  

5/16/14 11:31 AM by ErikMagraken

The original article, which you can find at the below link, does set this out.  It appears a few edits were made when the UGNews republished. http://combatsportslaw.com/2014/05/15/bc-athletic-commission-releases-tue-policy-and-anti-doping-policies/

Bossk site profile image  

5/16/14 11:09 AM by Bossk

Yeah like say British Columbia athletic commission first and then you can start saying bc ac through out the rest or the article.

ErikMagraken site profile image  

5/16/14 11:06 AM by ErikMagraken

Thanks for republishing this guys, cool to see my article on the UG News!

Il Duce site profile image  

5/16/14 1:14 AM by Il Duce

30 days ahead of competition? Wow, trailblazing.

StocktonStickerSlap site profile image  

5/16/14 12:09 AM by StocktonStickerSlap

Is it so hard to mention BCAC stands for British Columbia Athletic Commissioner, even just once in the article?

SouthBrooklyn site profile image  

5/16/14 12:03 AM by SouthBrooklyn

Daaaaang



 

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