Logo   Shawn Tompkins Has Some Decent Ideas About Lyoto Machida
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MMA Trainer Shawn Tompkins talks Machida and who his next opponent might be, Randy Couture and more with Steve Cofield and Dave Cokin on ESPN Radio 1100 in Las Vegas



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Ezekiel site profile image  

7/30/09 4:28 PM by Ezekiel

He said he would get top 3 best Karatekas in America and train with his fighter. That seems like a little arrogant on his part. My reasons are that, he seems that just training with couple Karate black belts ( who are great lets say), will automatically give him the "secrets" of karate and the intricate footwork, timing, and striking angles that are the cornerstones of the art and bring down Machida. Now, would he get Shotokan karatekas or perhaps those along in the Kyokushin, Enshin, or Ashihara Karate arts because they are arts that fight in full contact matches. I mean it takes YEARS to really get the intricacies of any martial art. That is like saying, "Well to beat Maia I'll get 3 best BJJ guys in his weight class and learn from them in 3 months and figure him out”. Machida relies on a completely different footwork template than the average Muay Thai figheter or boxer (though his use 45 degree angles is very similar to Western Boxing). Maybe pressing Machida up against the cage is a smart idea but remember, that’s easier said than done. This is a fighter who has fought Rich Franklin, BJ Penn, Soko, Evans, Silva, Bonnar, Nakamura …. All strong and some powerful grapplers (BJJ, Judo, or wrestling). Plus he said wrestlers are known for their work ethic but I will change that and say that any martial artist who is of a high caliber are hard working also no matter what it is; jiu jitsu, judo, karate, wing chun, greco roman, savate, etc. etc. Wrestling is a great grappling base but that base is not what it used to be. It seems that some fighters and trainers are afraid to diverge into new arts that are emerging into MMA, such as Sambo, different disciplines of Karate, Judo. And I think it’s the fear of learning something totally different that maintaining this stubbornness.