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SoundGround >> Help with modes


4/21/07 4:01 AM
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Tylerdurden10924
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Edited: 21-Apr-07
Member Since: 03/29/2003
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I'm having a little trouble understanding modes. What little I have learned has been through the CAGED system. What is so special about the different modes? For instance, isn't a C Major the same as an E Phrygian scale? the only possible difference I can think of would be with the chord progression. Is that all there is or is it more complicated? Thanks in advance
4/23/07 11:06 PM
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jman
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Edited: 23-Apr-07
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yeah nothing reallys special about modes, after a while it all clicks like "oh THIS is it, wtf was the big problem?" Really the only thing that makes the modes so special is that they share all of the same notes. The only thing that sets each individual mode apart is the notes you empahsize. So in C Ionian you would empahsize C-E-G in E Phrigian (same 7 notes) you would emphasize E-G-B. There has to be a ton of stuff on the interweb for you to look up on this stuff, but it's not that big a deal, you've probably already got it figured out.
4/24/07 1:58 AM
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wolfdeth
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Edited: 24-Apr-07
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The Modes are just more scales to learn..Thats all ..No big mystery.
4/24/07 1:58 AM
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wolfdeth
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Edited: 24-Apr-07 07:19 PM
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10/21/09 5:37 PM
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The Hook
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I've been wondering this same thing lately.

I don't really understand modes, but am I overthinking it?

I've looked at them and it just seems like it is a really simple concept, but for some reason it has been "mystified".
10/23/09 12:17 PM
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Hillbilly
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I drove myself crazy with modes and as jman said it just all of a sudden clicked. I actually think I wasted alot of time trying to figure out which mode I should be playing over which chord within a song when I could have been making music.
10/24/09 9:27 AM
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The Hook
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Anybody have any cool scale suggestions?

I'm stuck using the natural minor/major.
10/25/09 10:56 AM
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Hillbilly
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The Hook - Anybody have any cool scale suggestions?

I'm stuck using the natural minor/major.

Whole tone, #5 (aug), harmonic minor, bebop (b5).
10/27/09 1:04 AM
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whtblt4eva
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 hungarian minor = 1, 2, b3,  #4, 5, b6, 7

spanish phrygian (the 5th mode of harmonic minor) = 1, b2, 3, 4, 5, b6,b7 

romanian minor = 1, 2,b3, #4, 5, 6, b7

byzantine minor = 1, b2, 3, 4, 5, b6, 7

all of these are very fun for shreddy death metal.
10/27/09 2:34 PM
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Mitch Rommel
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Modes are related to each other, but that does not mean they are the same. For example, the scales for A (natural) minor, and C Major both have the exact same notes, but they are centered around different notes. In A, of course you will usually start and end on A. The same goes with any other mode. Just don't get so bogged down with theory that it limits you. I used to be a music major, so I have all these pesky rules of harmony in my head. Just trust your ears.
10/29/09 10:59 PM
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Jay Sin
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Edited: 10/29/09 11:01 PM
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mythrd
4/26/10 10:58 AM
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T Bag
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Edited: 04/26/10 12:11 PM
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Basically,

The first thing to understand is that there is diatonic music and modal (non-diatonic music). If you were to harmonize the C major scale and play CMaj7, DMin7,Emin7,Fmaj7,G7,Amin7, Bm7flat5 you would be in the key of C by definition (obviously). Now, if you were to play single note lines over that you would use the C Major scale and would be playing C,D,E,F,G,A,B. Now, no matter which note you were to emphasize in that scale, you would still be in the C major scale. Play the D note all you want. In fact, play nothing but the D note, it does not matter--you are not playing in the D Dorian mode--you are still playing C Major.
Why?
Because the function of each note in the scale has not changed. For instance, in the C major scale the D (supertonic) function is strongly pre-dominant. In D dorian, the D (tonic) is the tonal center. The, function and resulting sounds of the exact same notes in diatonic versus modal music is 100% different. Just try it and it will be obvious to your ears. Play the B over a Cmaj progression--theres a lot of tension there pulling to resolution. Now play that B over a D Dorian progression--much different flavour.

Guitarists generally struggle with modes more than other musicians. The reason for that is the reliance on pattern based harmonic theories (like CAGED). I think such methods can have their place, but only to supplement a solid theory understanding and to get the notes "under your fingers".

Bottom line, until you truly understand diatonic theory (at least the major and minor scale), which will take years in itself,  there is no point in getting into Modal music.
 
4/27/10 1:32 AM
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garrote2007
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I just saw this thread and I just created one about this, my bad
4/28/10 10:14 AM
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Demitrius Barbito
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Scales are sets of ascending and descending "notes" that go together in a particular key. Chords are developed from the notes in scales. For example: In an A MINOR scale the 1st, 3rd and 5th note make an A MINOR chord.

Modes are sets of scales that go together in a particular key. This family of scales can be transposed all over the neck and it allows for greater understanding of the entire fretboard landscape.

Chords, scales, modes and root notes are the building blocks of all guitar playing.

Demi

www.VisionsAndDreams.net

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