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Football Ground >> Graham Poll = Arsehole


6/1/07 5:53 AM
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Joe Ray
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Edited: 01-Jun-07
Member Since: 08/24/2000
Posts: 46259
 
Retirement: at least that's one decision Poll got right Matthew Syed says Graham Poll was a self-obsessed show-off, but do referees deserve respect from players and fans alike? Graham Poll, who has revealed the reasons behind his decision to retire from refereeing, is a man beyond parody. The preening, pouting "Thing from Tring" lambasted the FA for failing to back him in a row with Chelsea last year – in fact, an independent panel fined John Terry £10,000 for questioning Poll's integrity after his sending-off against Tottenham Hotspur – and went on to offer the spectacular assertion that the FA's "failure to act" had let down "the 27,000 men, women and boys who go out to referee each week and who need protection". How somebody so narcissistic managed to drag himself away from the dressing-room mirror often enough to forge a career as an official is a question for another time. In the meantime, it is worth noting that within hours of Poll delivering his supposedly selfless "revelations", his agent was issuing a press release hailing the forthcoming publication of an autobiography described as "shocking" and "often unbelievable". And that's just the accompanying photograph. Poll is arguably the worst referee of recent times, not because of the decisions he made on the pitch (although many were awful) but because of the way he went about them. He was, in my opinion, football's answer to the show-off who shouts on his mobile phone in a packed commuter carriage. He was the bar bore who confused self-congratulation with conversation. He was the grown-up infant who never learnt to reconcile the id and the ego. In short, he was the wrong sort of chap to let loose on a football pitch with a whistle and cards. Allow me to digress to tell you about Jack Randall, a short, bald intellectual who passed away five years ago and who looked as if he had emerged fully formed from the pages of a Graham Greene novel. His nose was never far from a book, his mind never far from the philosophy of Kant. He spent his spare time travelling the length and breadth of the country umpiring table tennis matches: unpaid, unassuming and generally unheeded. He was the most brilliant umpire I ever met, not simply because of the lucidity of his judgment but because of his pursuit of anonymity. He comprehended and embraced the crushing paradox at the heart of refereeing: you have power over the people who really matter. When he intervened to call a fault he did so reluctantly, aware that he was intruding upon the spectacle that people had come to watch. Poll was the polar opposite. He appeared to have insufficient maturity to give extended thought to the manifold subtleties involved in standing in judgment over one's fellow man. He seemed too self-obsessed to come to terms with the fact that his lot in life was that of a man who gets an opportunity to tread the boards alongside the matinee idols, but who is never allowed to sing. And so he did the next best thing: he tried to steal their notes. It is an approach he is taking with him into retirement. In his shameless attempt to grab the media spotlight, he has trampled on many of those who protected him when he was at his most vulnerable. Brian Barwick, the chief executive of the FA, the most conspicuous target of his vitriol, phoned Poll to offer encouragement after the World Cup fiasco when he issued three yellow cards to Josip Simunic. Barwick even took the risk of going public with his endorsement. Poll's pronouncements yesterday demonstrate gracelessness, ingratitude and vanity in equal measure. In one interview he talks about how he "went to the centre circle in Stuttgart after the match [in which he issued three yellow cards to Simunic] to say goodbye, because I almost felt I wouldn't have a choice in whether I was going to stay or not". This compulsion to muscle in on somebody else's glory was also evident after the Coca-Cola Championship play-offs finals at Wembley on Monday, when he went to the centre circle to hold his arms aloft, punch the air and wave to the crowd. Poll's personal tragedy is that he is oblivious to the fact that nobody was waving back. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/football/article1862693.ece
6/1/07 5:53 AM
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Joe Ray
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Edited: 01-Jun-07
Member Since: 08/24/2000
Posts: 46260
"when he went to the centre circle to hold his arms aloft, punch the air and wave to the crowd." LOLOLOL. What a fucking moron.
6/1/07 5:56 AM
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Filthy Mutant Sodomite
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Edited: 01-Jun-07
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 9150
A prize cunt in every sense of the word.
6/1/07 6:32 AM
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ManU0WestHam1X2
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Edited: 01-Jun-07
Member Since: 09/29/2006
Posts: 1980
<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/IjUho7zdiy4"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param></object> GREAT STUFF!!
6/1/07 10:33 AM
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GunFighter
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Edited: 01-Jun-07
Member Since: 11/16/2005
Posts: 4769
"when he went to the centre circle to hold his arms aloft, punch the air and wave to the crowd." Didn't know about that but not surprised - typical Poll.... Btw - that was never a goal..... :-)

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