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Jen >> Bolo...thoughts on lifting


7/5/07 8:42 AM
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Matthew Crispy
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Edited: 05-Jul-07
Member Since: 06/27/2007
Posts: 1
 
Deadlift, Squat and Olympic lifts, only, and as a supplement. I know with an imbalanced body they may be bad, but what about a functional body? Crossfit sings the deadlift's praises, so what do you think?
7/5/07 1:06 PM
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Bolo
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Edited: 05-Jul-07 02:10 PM
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 4905
A highly functional body can do whatever it wants, however, I have yet to see a body that doesn't have some pretty significant imbalances besides young children. This has been a result of the modern society that we live in. My MBF instructor has been doing this for a long time and he said he has definitely noticed that people's postures have gotten worse over the past 15 years. Keep in mind that having imbalances does not necessarily mean a person will have pain. My nanny's son was born with a congental defect and the alignment of his body is messed up, however, he feels no pain because he is very young. He has no pain, but he walks and runs "funny". The misalignment in his body prevents him from moving as quickly. A student of mine has really bad imbalances, but he has no pain. His imbalances result in him being noticably weak for his size. I have another student who has a body with a lot of imbalances and even though he has no pain, he has poor flexibility. Every person's body has different issues, so when a person's body is ready for strength training, the type of exercises that is appropriate for one person may not be appropriate for another. Each person needs to be looked at on a individual personalized basis, so I would be reluctant to say certain "man made" exercises are great for everyone. One mentality that people need to change is the absolute need to lift big weights in order to get stronger. Functional strength is about performance. Let me give you an example. In my strength and conditioning workouts, I do walking, running, obstacle course work, swimming, indoor rock climbing, and I'm going to add biking and jump rope. I also have upper and lower body strength routines within my MBF programs and I am not using anything more than 8 lbs.. So basically, I am dealing with my own bodyweight and some light free weights. In the past, I would also push my Toyota Prius half way down my street and back. That so incredibly exhausting, especially on my legs. However, I had not done that in almost 3 months. I did it the other day, after not doing it for 3 months, and it was so much easier than in the past. I felt like I used half the effort that I did in the past. A car is an extremely heavy object and I was able to move it easier despite the fact that in my regular exercise program, I never dealt with anything greater than my own bodyweight and 8 pound free weights. I have no idea how much I can squat or deadlift because I don't do those exercises and I really don't care how much I can lift. What matters to me is how I am able to move heavy objects that exist in "regular life". I'm not saying that those exercises aren't beneficial. I don't do them because it is not suitable for my body yet. I'm just saying that is not an absolute necessity when it come to becoming stronger. Some people tend to get so caught up in the numbers of how much they are lifting that they seem to forget the purpose of why they are lifting. If you are lifting to help your BJJ, but after a year your BJJ hasn't improved much, you need to think about how much that lifting has helped your performance. By the way, I find that good old fashion manual labor is a way to develop strength that is often overlooked.
7/7/07 5:24 PM
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m.g
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Edited: 07-Jul-07
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 5395
"I find that good old fashion manual labor is a way to develop strength that is often overlooked." Yep!! This is actually one of the best ways to develop strength. I haven't lifted weights, in the traditional sense, in about 3 years. What I mean by traditional sense is the classic strength lifts like squat, bench press, deadlifts and the like. When I do lift weight it is only Olympic style weighlifting (clean and jerks, snatch) and I haven't done that in about three months. The only type of lifting I do is at work. I work in a warehouse wear I lift heavy boxes for about 3 hours. The boxes I lift weigh , on average, about 70 lbs. Anyway, I've obtained a tremendous amount of strength just from the work I at work. So much so that I don't even go to the gym and lift. One of my friends who is a college strength coach told me that the strongest he has ever been was when he use to work in construction. Manuel labor, at one time, was very common in the U.S but nowadays people are far more sedetary. Manuel labor includes warehouse work, farmwork, construction, dock work, etc.
7/9/07 5:23 PM
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Bolo
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Edited: 09-Jul-07
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 4918
Not only is manual labor as far the jobs you mentioned less common, but labor when it comes to common household chores is becoming replaced by machines or many people will hire other people to do it. Heck, I'm sure many people remember how there were no TV remotes when we were children and we actually had to get our ass up off the couch to change the channel. Now, if I can't find the remote, I just don't watch TV because I'm too lazy to get up constantly to change the channel. One thing that people should notice is the amount of time your body is actually working when doing manual labor in comparison to then they are in the gym lifting weights. If you look at the actual amount of time the weights are being lifted, it is actually pretty small. People tend to spend more time resting between sets than actually working out. When you do manual labor, you tend to be moving continuously and exerting yourself for a far greater amount of time. I hadn't done much manual labor in my life and I eventually realized that no matter how much weight training I did, it never really prepared my body for the strain of manual labor. I'm trying to "de-wussify" myself and do a certain amount of manual labor which I normally would have hired someone else to do. The funny thing is how people get into all these fancy training methods and equipment when it comes to strength training and the simplest things are often overlooked. We tend to make things more complex than they need to be.
7/15/07 12:48 PM
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Matthew Crispy
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Edited: 15-Jul-07
Member Since: 06/27/2007
Posts: 6
What about breakdancing? Gymnastics and climbing have a lot of body tension so I presume it would be similar?
7/15/07 2:27 PM
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m.g
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Edited: 15-Jul-07
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"We tend to make things more complex than they need to be." Ain't that the gospel truth!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
7/16/07 2:30 PM
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Bolo
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Edited: 16-Jul-07
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 4924
Matthew Crispy, I like to classify movement into a few categories. 1. Natural unskilled movement. These including movement like walking, running, hiking, climbing, crawling, bear walking, brachiation, jumping, simple manual labor, etc... These movements do not take long for children or adults to learn/figure out. These movements are things that people don't really need to have any formal instruction on how to do. The movement that children do when playing is great example of this. 2. Man-made unskilled movement. These movements are things that people have created, but it doesn't take long to "get" these movements. This includes stuff like push-ups, kettlebells, biking, etc..... These movements require a little instruction, but don't take years to get good at. 3. Man-made skilled movement. These movements are much more complex and takes years to get good at. In addition, some of these movements are at a level in which many people are unable to do or do well no matter how much they practice. Breakdancing and gymnastics are examples of this, however, shooting a basketball is also an example of this. In my personal opinion, a person should make sure their bodies are fully capable of doing natural unskilled movement, and doing it without pain, before worrying about doing the other forms of movement. Natural unskilled movement is the basic building block for all other more complex forms of movement. (But, I'm also not saying that a person need to be able to run a marathon or do manual labor for 8 hours before they can do more complex movements.)

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