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AcademicGround >> Anyone work in Psychology?


7/10/07 5:25 PM
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mendelson
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Edited: 10-Jul-07
Member Since: 01/01/2001
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Hello Everyone! I am currently a graduate student earning my Masters Degree in Psychology. I am interested in becoming a licensed Psychotherapist after I finish my Master's, and I am unsure how to go about doing this. I am planning on continuing through my Doctoral Degree, so I would like to get into the field to start building my resume. I am currently a teacher so I would not mind teaching undergrad courses once I finish my masters. I am just kinf of testing the waters to build some contacts right now. Do any of you know what steps I can take to make forward progress? Any advice you guys can give me is greatly appreciated. Thanks. -rich mendelson
7/11/07 11:16 AM
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Ted Bennett
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Edited: 11-Jul-07
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Hmmm....where to start ;-)

1. If you are about to finish a master's degree, you can probably do therapy, at least in most states, though in many you will have to do so under some kind of supervisor. It depends if you want to hang out a shingle on go on your own or join an established practice or hospital, etc. Check out your state's psychology board to see what licensing requirements there are, if any (e.g., some states will not give a license to folks with a MA/MS only, although you can still be a therapist in most hospitals.

2. If you want to go on and get a Ph.D. or Psy.D., be careful where you apply - some sites will make you re-do most of your courses and even your thesis (if you did one), some won't.

3. About teaching - if you go to a university and start a doctoral program, you could probably teach from day one, at most universities they're usually begging for enough teachers.

4. If you want to build contacts, figure out what you like (testing, therapy, groups, etc.) and then join the relevant group(s) in APA so you can find out who the big dogs are. Student dues are pretty cheap, and that will give you access to many listservs that will (A) give you lots of good info and (B) allow you to network with folks. Ditto with becoming a student member of your state association.

I'll hunt up some threads on here where I posted more info on the topic....

7/11/07 11:23 AM
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Ted Bennett
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Edited: 11-Jul-07
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Here's one:

http://www.mma.tv/TUF/index.cfm?ac=ListMessages&PID=1&TID=718567&FID=105

 

7/11/07 6:53 PM
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mendelson
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Edited: 11-Jul-07
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Thanks Dr. Ted. I will not be finishing my Masters until December of 2008. I am currently working as a high school teacher, but I would really like to get into a faculty position at a university or open up my own counseling practice. I would like to specialize in athletic performance preparation. I have a pret good resume in athletics, so I think I would be able to be relatively successful with this. After my Masters is complete, then it is onto my Doctoral Degree. Do you suggest a PhD, or a PsyD? I have heard many things about both of hem, but I am leaning more towards a PhD at this point.. -rich mendelson
7/12/07 10:49 AM
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Ted Bennett
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Edited: 12-Jul-07
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I would really like to get into a faculty position at a university or open up my own counseling practice

Those are two *really* different goals, at some point you'll have to pick one over the other. A practice will involve doing lots of (surprise!) practice, but most faculty jobs will entail doing lots of research, and believe it or not, most don't involve a lot of teaching (e.g., at a decent sized university, a Ph.D. psychology prof will likely teach 1 undergrad course and 1 grad course per semester, hardly a full-time teacher, and many will do only 1 class). You'll have to figure that out early on, as you'll start specializing in your Ph.D. program by the second year, and you'll have to pick either research and publications (which is what you need to be competitive for faculty jobs) or seeing lots of patients (which is what you'll need to be competitive for clinical positions). If you like the idea of being a college prof who counsels students or does therapy with a mostly college population, there are some jobs like that, but most will make you responsible for a college clinic and not any sort of teaching load.

I would like to specialize in athletic performance preparation.

You're going to have to do some serious research to find out who specializes in that, that's not a common specialty in most programs. I'd try to find out what the usual journals are that publish articles in that area, write down the names of folks who you think do cool stuff, find out where they are, and then contact them about whether or not they're accepting students or if they know anyone they can recommend.

Do you suggest a PhD, or a PsyD? I have heard many things about both of hem, but I am leaning more towards a PhD at this point..

The other thread has some info on that, but I'll repeat it in nutshell here:

PH.D. - Pros - most likely to give you a broad base of skills (both research and therapy/clinical skills), most one-on-one mentoring time from your advisor, most likely to get publications for a faculty job, and most likely to give you assistantships which will cut down on your financial aid burden

             - Cons - very competitive, you'll be one of hundreds of people applying for only dozens of spots, sometimes finishing the research will drag out your time there (e.g., some people may take up to 6 years to finish before going off to internship, it's supposed to be 4 years)

Psy.D. - Pros - usually easier to get into, will definitely prepare you for clinical work, they get you in and out in 4 years flat

             - Cons - many fewer assistantships (teaching, clinics, etc.) since there are so many more students, so that means higher student loans, less mentoring and individual supervision, unlikely to be competitive for faculty jobs because you won't be publishing research

Of course, all that is kind of an average - there are Psy.D. programs that will publish research, and there are Ph.D. programs that do nothing but clinical work, but on the whole that's generally how they're different.

And scratch that "Dr. Ted" business, man, I get on the OG to *get away* from people who call me "doc" :-P   I'm just Ted here....

7/12/07 2:48 PM
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mendelson
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Edited: 12-Jul-07
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Thanks Ted. I have about 17 months left on my Masters program, so I guess I have some time to figure it all out. The truth is that I am interested in both of the fields that I mentioned earlier. Working as a prof would be interesting, and working as a counselor would be stimulating as well. The issue I am having is that I am concerned that I will be able to make a living as well as pay off my student loans. Sports Psychology is my passion and I have a very high level of drive to achieve in that field. I have actually already begun working in this field and I have already worked with pro fighters, as well as wrestlers on the collegiate level. I also have worked with Professional Powerlifters in reaching their goals. I want to earn my PhD to legitimize what I do. I look forward to learning more as I get deeper intot eh graduate level coursework. Thanks so much for your input and information. -rich mendelson
7/17/07 12:28 AM
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eabeam
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Edited: 17-Jul-07
Member Since: 08/28/2001
Posts: 2314
Cruise your state website for a licensing body.. in California there is the psychboard and board of behavioral sciences. psychboard.ca.gov bbs.ca.gov They explain the various licenses, scope of practice, and requirements.
7/20/07 1:04 AM
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DuSmiEthwhi
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Edited: 20-Jul-07
Member Since: 08/08/2003
Posts: 2382
*saves for later*

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