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DantheWolfMan UnderGround >> Scenario training ?


7/15/07 9:48 PM
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spc36
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Edited: 15-Jul-07
Member Since: 02/01/2004
Posts: 184
 
For those of you who have done years of scenario training , do you still get an adrenal dump? Thanks, Shane
7/19/07 11:38 AM
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Jonathan Berman
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Edited: 19-Jul-07
Member Since: 11/04/2004
Posts: 15
Shane, A few things – well more than a few - off the top of my head. The short answer is yes – and the reality of this experience is arrived at through following a number of BTS training protocols. One of the aforementioned protocols is "learn the drill, forget it's a drill." Don't muscle it - find ways to put yourself as emotionally, psychologically, and physically off-balance (depending upon the chosen scenario – and the scenario should be a realistic one) as possible. Don't jump speed and get tactical too quickly – the pejorative ego is going to want you to win, so keep in mind the intent of the drill, part of which has to do with emotional/psychological processing speed and conversion – and if you truly embrace that intent, you will allow the primal reaction to happen. Not to mention the natural dump from performance anxiety. Be A Good Bad Guy (BAGBG). Role players, on both sides of the moral equation, should not be complacent just because they have trained together a lot. The good guy is addressed above, here we address the Bad Guy. There are a number of concepts that go along with this, but for the purposes of this post, simply put, the Bad Guy should be a good actor - they should not just be holding the gun, etc., but know why they are, what they want within the confines of that scenario, and move/act in a congruent fashion. The role of High Gear, in my case at least, must not be underestimated. The ability for all role players to be able to attack/defend, move, and feel (HG is IMPACT REDUCTION) with realistic ballisticism and proximity sense cannot help but engender tactical reality, and yes, fear. Again, the suits are impact reduction – they don't eat the shots like bulkier types – and safety protocols must be followed. This is not to say that with Good Bad Guys and a realistic scenario I wouldn't get an adrenaline dump without High Gear, but it wouldn't be the same experience. All parts of the BTS Ballistic Micro-Fight process (and there are more) – my final point being that if proper scientific and good role playing protocol is followed, yes, you still get the dump. Big time. Jonathan Berman
7/19/07 5:30 PM
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Tony Torres
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Edited: 19-Jul-07
Member Since: 11/21/2005
Posts: 23
Great response from Jonathan. The only thing I would add is that, once you become somewhat stress inocculated to the common attacks, it's time to start entering variables and multipliers. Variables are things like changing the environment and positions you are training from. Multipliers change the threat or danger levels such as adding more attackers, weapons and different threat discrimination protocols such as the Live Action Response Drill (tm). By making the proccess more 3-dimensionally complex it will ensure the adrenaline dump happens all the time. Tony Torres BTS
7/19/07 8:35 PM
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spc36
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Edited: 19-Jul-07
Member Since: 02/01/2004
Posts: 187
Thanks Tony and Jonathan. Shane
7/19/07 10:44 PM
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JT Goodman
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Edited: 19-Jul-07
Member Since: 02/24/2006
Posts: 3
Shane, YES would be my answer, however, the difference I have learned through training with the SPEAR System is that I'm better able to manage the adrenaline dump prior to and post the scenario. The reasons for that are the BMFs Mr. Berman spoke of, and introducing the "variables and multipliers" Mr. Torres mentioned only helps 'stress innoculate' you more to the scenario. The BMF is a formula that can be applied to a HUGE amount of training. The feeling of "Been there, done that" which you receive from this scientific approach is incredible. There is a saying in the SPEAR System which mentions we are doing the "most realistic FAKE stuff out there." Very true statement, because no matter how realistic the training is, it's NOT the actual scenario/fight. Utilizing the High Gear, we are able to come as close as you can to the 'real thing.' This allows the adrenalin dump to roll through us because there is still danger, there is still the opportunity to get hurt. JT Goodman
7/20/07 8:21 AM
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armory
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Edited: 20-Jul-07
Member Since: 08/12/2005
Posts: 395
Shane, All great stuff in this thread. Remember one of the goals of the scenario training in regards the adrenaline is to minimize it and allow you to tactically start to make good decisions in regards to problem solving on the fly. If you are emotionally or psychologically unavailable, you are tactically probably not doing well in the situation. The more time you spend in what can be defined as "bad situations" and the more adept you are at realizing certain solutions, you will have a harder and harder time having an extended adrenaline dump. Thats where a really good trainer and coach comes in and designs situations that challenge even the high end performers. Joe

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