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Health & Medical UnderGround >> Myofascial release


7/19/07 5:31 PM
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torquemada
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Edited: 19-Jul-07
Member Since: 01/15/2006
Posts: 921
 
Does anyone here have any experience w/ it? I just finished getting my initial training with it and am seeing great results...
7/25/07 1:52 PM
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neonrain2
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Edited: 25-Jul-07
Member Since: 05/06/2002
Posts: 177
I've been doing it with bio-foam rollers and balls for about 2 years. It is by far the best warm up and recovery tool yet. After an intense workout I use the rollers and by the next day I'm feeling great. After awhile I had to upgrade to both firmer rollers and a smaller ball though. Great stuff.
7/26/07 12:37 AM
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keck2124
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Edited: 26-Jul-07
Member Since: 05/23/2006
Posts: 12
What the hell is it?
7/26/07 10:22 AM
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saint39
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Edited: 26-Jul-07
Member Since: 09/23/2000
Posts: 984
According to my wife(massage therapist), myofascial release is basically stretching the fascia covering the muscles. Can increase ROM and reduce tension, adhesions(knots), etc.
8/15/07 9:30 AM
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Ray Blackburn
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Edited: 15-Aug-07
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 2477
Sounds like rolfing.
9/2/07 4:35 PM
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yusul
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Edited: 02-Sep-07
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 10878
rolfing is a form of myofascial release. more specifically, the direct school. actually, that work is often called structural integration.
1/4/08 4:09 AM
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JasonE
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Edited: 04-Jan-08
Member Since: 12/28/2007
Posts: 9
Myofascial Release is a type of bodywork that directly addresses adhesions in the fascia, connective tissue found throughout the whole body. That name was co-opted by John Barnes, PT, for his approach. Other methods of working with fascia include Connective Tissue Massage, Fascial Release, Fascial Unwinding, and so forth. Rolfing is a particular protocol used to evaluate and correct the structural relationships within the body. Rolfers primarily work with the fascia to resolve various imbalances so the body returns to optimal alignment. The "Rolfing" name is used by a group that broke away from Ida Rolf's original work after she died. It is somewhat different from the original method, which was preserved and is now called Structural Integration. There are newer methods evolving out of these two schools. All of these methods use many techniques found in Myofascial Release, but the treatment perspective is different, resulting in different protocols and levels of intensity.
1/8/08 11:36 AM
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yusul
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Edited: 08-Jan-08
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 11057
just added some further info for the first poster when i said direct work, the idea is to go through or break down the lesion or fascia adhesion, going into the direction of resistance. this in some schools is called bind. in indirect work, the therapist goes in the direction of the lesion, which subtle drags the tissue towards the lesion, until you get a release, which can be felt as a drop in tension, heat increasing in the area, etc. this is called ease in the same schools. it's like when you want to untie your shoe laces, you don't pull the laces harder but you go the other way (easier way) to unravel it. while i believe that barnes actually trademarked myofascial release, his approach which includes unwinding and tractions, and rebounding, is not unique, as many osteopaths and other bodyworkers such as cranial therapists (from the upledger, milne schools of training etc.) use unwinding and traction concepts. manual therapists for ages have been working with the fascia, or more specifically the fascia surrounding the muscle (myofascia). the SI people i've encountered tend to go deep, although i think it was tom myers (it could have been art riggs) , a famous SI person who trained under ida rolf, said she used a light touch at the end of her life. tom myers is a pretty interesting guy if you ever have a chance to take a course with him, he's very succinct and no nonsense. it can also be argued that the visceral manipulation pioneered by the french osteopath barral is also a form of fascia release as targeting the mobility and motility of the organs would have an effect on the surround fascia, and from the other end, often fascia restrictions can cause mobility or motility problems.

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