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Jen >> Your guard series


9/12/07 12:41 PM
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Grappler2010
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Edited: 12-Sep-07
Member Since: 12/10/2003
Posts: 109
 
Bolo, How dated would you say your guard product series is? I had just realized that when I was in my 20's and did juijitsu opponents wouldn't know anything about posture and passing guard. Now in my late 30's (after taking 12 years off bjj) i'm looking into it and discovering that even white belts start off with basic knowledge of posture and how to pass the guard. It appears from what I'm read that UG1 and UG2 deal with resisting opponents who are more wild than those that will play juijitsu. Do you think against todays juijitsu players at white to blue belt your tapes still have results? I know they have value (i.e. it shows how to learn the basics) , but results in terms of winning tapouts. Do you have any students who are great at guard just because of their attacks and can beat those even who know how to posture and pass because they're faster in thinking?? thanks grappler 2010
9/13/07 3:41 AM
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Bolo
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Edited: 13-Sep-07 03:47 AM
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What I have found is that people tend to judge the effectiveness of technique taught on video based on how little they have to practice the techniques they are taught. People tend to have the mentality that if they watch a video and are able to pull off the techniques right away in class, it is great technique, but if it requires years of practice and doesn't work right away, the technique doesn't work very well against real resistance. I have had many people order my videos and contact me about the great results they have had. Of course there are also those who have watched my videos and not seen the value in them. When it comes to any product, you can't make 100% of people happy. So I can't say whether my series is exactly what you are looking for. I think it will help you, but I'm biased since I made the videos. UG1 covers the basics and deals with reacting to people who make big mistakes. UG2 covers how to set people up because they don't make as big of mistakes because they know more jiu-jitsu.
9/13/07 7:32 AM
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Grappler2010
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Edited: 13-Sep-07
Member Since: 12/10/2003
Posts: 110
Bolo, Thanks for your reply. Can you give an example of how one can beat a "posture and pass" opponent with the basic strategy of continuous barage of attacks. I assume its not just who launches first. For example if i choose to launch into a barage of armbar - triangle combinations my opponent may simply have posture, grab the legs GIVEN and pass. Then my guard is passed. Will posture and pass defeat a barage of continuous attack. If not please illustrate with an example. grappler 2010
9/14/07 4:36 PM
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cincibill
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Edited: 14-Sep-07
Member Since: 05/21/2006
Posts: 117
"Will posture and pass defeat a barage of continuous attack. If not please illustrate with an example." You tell us. After 12 years of jiujitsu is your system of breaking ones guard passing posture and subsequent systematic attack of submissions able to beat their posture and pass?
9/15/07 12:17 AM
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m.g
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Edited: 15-Sep-07 12:25 AM
Member Since: 01/01/2001
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Bolo, You said: "What I have found is that people tend to judge the effectiveness of technique taught on video based on how little they have to practice the techniques they are taught. People tend to have the mentality that if they watch a video and are able to pull off the techniques right away in class, it is great technique, but if it requires years of practice and doesn't work right away, the technique doesn't work very well against real resistance." This is a very true and excellent point. This mentality you speak of, in my opinion, is a very dangerous and harmful mentality have especially in the long run. I personal believe alot of techniques and skills would better serve the average individual if this individual would simply learn to endure the difficulties some techniques and skills bring as well as persist through the seemingly hard moments in learning the technique/skill. But because there is a mentality of taking the easy road I fell alot of people miss out in regards to their own growth and development in Bjj. It is amazing how little people actually practice the technique they learn or even practice the techniques they know. And like you said everyone judges the value of a technique by how easy it is to do and how soon one is able to pull it off. If a technique, even if it is a good and practical technique, takes TIME and some EFFORT to learn and, more importantly master, then people will shy away from that technique even though that technique may be tailor fit for them and their game. In my opinion it shows how lazy and unwilling some people are in helping themselves to grow and playing a part in their own development.
9/15/07 5:43 AM
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cdog1955
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Edited: 15-Sep-07
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 619
I would say the majority of people don't know how to train in the most effiecent manner.
9/15/07 7:19 AM
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Grappler2010
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Edited: 15-Sep-07
Member Since: 12/10/2003
Posts: 111
Cicibill, I never said I had 12 years in juijitsu. I said I took 12 years OFF juijitsu. Read my message carefully. Grappler 2010
9/15/07 7:21 AM
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Grappler2010
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Edited: 15-Sep-07
Member Since: 12/10/2003
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ALL, Thanks for the feedback and input guys. I know Bolos stuff is good material. I just picked up a book called the "ESSENTIAL GUARD" by Rodrigo Medeirosand Kid Peligro , and it talks about the importance of dealing with reacting to your oppoennts posture and pass first before attacks. This is a great book BTW. Amazing stuff. Grappler 2010
9/15/07 1:39 PM
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m.g
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Edited: 15-Sep-07
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Cdog1955, You said: "I would say the majority of people don't know how to train in the most efficient manner." I only partly agree with this. Most people as absolute beginners may not know at first BUT it just isn't that hard to learn nor pick up on. All one really has to do is observe how it has been done for years. Skilled activities are NOT new. People have been learning them, doing them, mastering them for decades, perhaps since the day people have been on the earth. Becoming skilful at something has already been thought out. All a person need to do is simply DO and FOLLOW what has already be carefully laid out. People, in my opinion, either look for the easy way out or try to reinvent the wheel.
9/15/07 3:05 PM
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Bolo
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Edited: 15-Sep-07 03:57 PM
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Grappler2010, There is no one formula for success when it comes to having an effective guard. Having and effective guard is the ability to develop a strategy on the spot for a given opponent. What is effective against one person may not be effective for another. Even with one person, your strategy will have to change over time. Also, what one person may consider good posture may not be considered good by another. It all depends on your skill, knowledge, and perspective. If you are a beginner, I guarantee you won't pick up as may of the errors and flaws in a person's posture as I would. What you consider perfect posture may be highly flawed from my perspective. With my videos, or anyone else's videos, you must not consider then the final solution to problems you may be having. Instructional videos are just the starting point. They just point you in a general direction when you had no idea where to go.
9/15/07 9:50 PM
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cincibill
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Edited: 15-Sep-07
Member Since: 05/21/2006
Posts: 118
Grappler2010, I certainly did misread, I owe you a good ans. I agree with "dealing with reacting to your oppoennts posture and pass first before attacks." First break down your opponents posture, it is off of the broken posture that you will have opportunity for submissions or sweeps. Its been a long time since I watched the tapes (I purchased prior DVD) but if I recall correctly they cover a)Basic submissions and sweeps b) How to tie them together and c) The concept of reference positions to get to that allow one to launch new series of attacks he shows. The reference positions allow you to have an arsenal of reactions to common resistances and movements with a smaller menu selection in your head.
9/15/07 10:08 PM
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cincibill
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Edited: 15-Sep-07
Member Since: 05/21/2006
Posts: 119
Continued - beyond the attacks discussed above; The tapes a) show how to recoup guard or react to simple movements that a person will do in an attempt to pass, both kneeling and standing. b)The tapes then shows reference positions and and subsequently a sweep series that is available as you defend the pass. c) Lastly, throughout he shows how to train and drill the material. The best guard material I have seen in a set, a must have. Chock full of information that one must know to have a decent guard and enough information that if you train the material you will not have a problem with white belts posturing and passing.
9/18/07 2:48 AM
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ams
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Edited: 18-Sep-07
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 729
I would highly recommend the guard passing dvd
9/28/07 3:30 PM
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m.g
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Edited: 28-Sep-07 09:10 PM
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Bolo, I know this may sound patronizing BUT I have to say this. You have really matured in regards to your thinking about Bjj and life in general. You beginning to sound like me. Just kidding. I've always tried to have and maintain, what I like to call, a sober, logical, practical and sensible mind in regards to learning and practicing Bjj (and other martial arts/combat sports). I respond to, what I feel, is logical/practical sense. I feel these words of yours are extremely useful because they are, to me, extremel logical and practical: You said: "There is no one formula for success when it comes to having an effective guard. Having and effective guard is the ability to develop a strategy on the spot for a given opponent. What is effective against one person may not be effective for another. Even with one person, your strategy will have to change over time." "...what one person may consider good posture may not be considered good by another. It all depends on your skill, knowledge, and perspective. If you are a beginner, I guarantee you won't pick up as may of the errors and flaws in a person's posture as I would. What you consider perfect posture may be highly flawed from my perspective." "With my videos, or anyone else's videos, you must not consider then the final solution to problems you may be having. Instructional videos are just the starting point. They just point you in a general direction when you had no idea where to go."
9/28/07 5:01 PM
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Bolo
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Edited: 28-Sep-07
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Haa..haa.... I know what you are saying. With both BJJ and life, I'm always learning too. :)
9/30/07 7:30 AM
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Grappler2010
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Edited: 30-Sep-07
Member Since: 12/10/2003
Posts: 113
One question Bolo, My cardio isn't the greatest now that I'm significantly older. Do you find older students can still effectively pull off the combinations in your ultimate guard series at slower speeds? Or is there a minimum cardio level thats required. I mean I don't move like Helio gracie but I'm no ralph gracie either :) hehe grappler 2010
10/3/07 3:24 AM
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Bolo
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Edited: 03-Oct-07 03:28 AM
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Grappler2010, Excelling in any physical activity requires the improvement of attributes, both mental and physical. The lower your attributes, the less you will be able to progress. If you want to be able to hang with opponents of greater skill and attributes, then you must develop your skills and attributes. There's no way around it unless you only want to grapple against lower skilled opponents or those who are are weaker and in worse shape. In my opinion, the aging process itself is not the cause of a lack of cardio, but rather it is often a shift in priority and interests as you get older. I am in my early 30's and I don't have the same drive to train and have great cardio like when I was 18. So the lack of cardio is a result of choices I made, not because my body has aged. If you are looking for some magic pill that will help you excell in BJJ without needing to be in shape, it doesn't exist. Yes, I can roll with lower belts and not need to be in shape because I have developed certain attributes at a high enough level that I don't need as much cardio. However, if you have me roll with some good higher belts, especially if they are much bigger and stronger than I am, I'm going to need some better cardio to be more successful. Think of my videos like a car that will help take you from point A to point B. The fuller the tank is with gas, the farther you will go.
10/3/07 11:39 AM
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Grappler2010
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Edited: 03-Oct-07
Member Since: 12/10/2003
Posts: 115
Bolo, haha great analogy. Thanks for your input as always. grappler 2010
10/4/07 2:26 PM
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m.g
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Edited: 04-Oct-07
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Bolo said: "Excelling in any physical activity requires the improvement of attributes, both mental and physical. The lower your attributes, the less you will be able to progress. If you want to be able to hang with opponents of greater skill and attributes, then you must develop your skills and attributes. There's no way around it unless you only want to grapple against lower skilled opponents or those who are are weaker and in worse shape." Excellent point.
10/26/07 7:54 AM
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Grappler2010
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Edited: 26-Oct-07
Member Since: 12/10/2003
Posts: 127
Bolo: Any tips or strategies when one should employ UG1 techniques and when one should use the strategy in UG 2, intermediate guard? As an example I was thinking UG1 is fine when you are fully of energy and not tired, as it looks like it requres a lot of endurance with the combinations; UG2 may be better against opponents who don't make traditional mistakes and also when YOU are tired and don't want a wild game. Any more strategies along these lines? Also on a different tangent I need an expert like yourself to give me advice on what to do against an opponent who pulls a shamrock on ones guard and same defensive curled up posture when under the mount. If the opponent has arms tucked in tight, has head forward so you can't hip bump, doesn't leave openings for acquiring any sort of armlock or kimura, has chin tucked. What do you do? Picture Shamrock vs Gracie #2 with no strikes. My judo instructor use to say grab his belt and roll him but he was strong as hell and I'm not. What do I do against this type of opponent. Thank you for answering. grappler 2010

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