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Jen >> Defensive BJJ opponents


10/30/07 2:09 PM
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Grappler2010
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Edited: 30-Oct-07
Member Since: 12/10/2003
Posts: 128
 
Bolo: Any tips or strategies when one should employ UG1 techniques and when one should use the strategy in UG 2, intermediate guard? As an example I was thinking UG1 is fine when you are fully of energy and not tired, as it looks like it requres a lot of endurance with the combinations; UG2 may be better against opponents who don't make traditional mistakes and also when YOU are tired and don't want a wild game. Any more strategies along these lines? Also on a different tangent I need an expert like yourself to give me advice on what to do against an opponent who pulls a shamrock on ones guard and same defensive curled up posture when under the mount. If the opponent has arms tucked in tight, has head forward so you can't hip bump, doesn't leave openings for acquiring any sort of armlock or kimura, has chin tucked. What do you do? Picture Shamrock vs Gracie #2 with no strikes. My judo instructor use to say grab his belt and roll him but he was strong as hell and I'm not. What do I do against this type of opponent. Thank you for answering. grappler 2010
10/30/07 2:41 PM
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Bolo
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Edited: 30-Oct-07 01:49 PM
Member Since: 01/01/2001
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I think you misunderstood the idea I was trying to teach with the videos. It is not about one or the other. UG1 close guard materal first teaches you basic techniques and the general large body movements that your opponent does which signal that is time to do certain techniques. It is imporant that you are able to recognize when certain techniques can be done and cannot be done. The second thing it teaches in the idea of how to connect techniques together when you get resistance. I'm not saying that you wil do a 5 technique combo in reality, but rather that you simply needs to learn the idea of how to flow from one technique to another. UG2 closed guard material teaches you how to create options for yourself in the event that you do not see an obvious opening for a technique. Keep in mind that there are times in which you go from a technique taught in UG2 and you get resistance and that may lead you to something taught in UG1. What I am teaching is a simple progression in learning guard work, not "one or the other". A specific answer to your question in regards to strategy cannot be given because their are too many factors involved. For example, you must think about things such as: 1. Your opponent's skill level in comparison to yours 2. Your opponent's strength, size, and weight in comparison to yours. 3. Your level of endurance in comparison to your opponents. 4. Why has your opponent chosen to be defensive? 5. What side does your opponent prefer to pass the guard? 6. What are your opponent's favorite techniques? 7. Are you better with techniques on one side than the other and if so, which side? 8. What is your opponent favorite method to uncross your ankles? There are more, but these are just some examples of questions you need to figure out for yourself in regards to your opponent in order to develop a proper strategy. Then as your opponent differs the answers to those questions will differ which means your strategy will differ. In my personal opinion, if you are a beginner, you shouldn't have a big focus on strategy because you are already focusing so hard on remembering basic techniques. Under pressure, you're mind can't focus on numerous things at once very well. If you want to improve your guard game, your instructor should force the opponent to try to pass and minimize the amount of stalling. The defensive stalling for an excessive amount of time serves no benefit in improving the skills for either of you.
10/30/07 3:17 PM
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Grappler2010
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Edited: 30-Oct-07 02:23 PM
Member Since: 12/10/2003
Posts: 129
Bolo, I do indeed agree with you. Maybe I didn't summarize what I believed is the strategy I got from watching UG1 and UG2 but i do understand that: *GO FOR UG2, USE UG1 WHEN COMBINATIONS COME UP OFF UG2 ATTACKS. UG2 IS BASE FOR GAMEPLAN . UG1 BASIC ATTACKS IS SO YOU KNOW HOW TO PERFORM THE BASIC MOVES. I've seen many coaches (black belts in other styles) I've trained with simply stall and pull a shamrock in guard or underneath the mount in a defensive curled up posture. It really frustrated me because although I knew they didn't know much BJJ there was nothing I could do because I couldn't hit. So are you saying aside from a teacher intervening and pushing the action, there is no other solution to "force the action " myself? In Royces book Ultimate Fighting Techniques he talked about opening up when an opponent is too defensive. Eg if you're crowding him he gets defensive but if you go wild and not try to hold or pin he may be inclined to make a move. Any thoughts on this?
10/30/07 3:50 PM
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Bolo
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Edited: 30-Oct-07
Member Since: 01/01/2001
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No, I'm not saying that you can't force the action, however, it all depends on the answers mentioned above. In addition, one thing you, and everyone including myself, needs to come to terms with is that if a person is big and strong enough, knows generally what's going on, and especially if that person is familiar with your game, that person can stall and prevent you from doing things no matter how much you force it. And no, I am not saying that the only solution is for the teacher to step in. I am saying that if they teacher was truly concerned about your progress, he would create a situation that would allow you you both to work on the techniques you know and develope your game. As far as Royce...When Roy Harris and I took our sambo friend Nick Baturin to roll with Royce, Nick would often lay flat on his stomach grab his collars, dip his chin, and stall. This was a habit he had from judo and sambo. Nick was incredibly strong for his size, had a very strong grip, and a very high pain tolerance. Royce could not break through Nick's stalling position, so he eventually did something that was against BJJ rules and pulled up on Nick's nose in order to lift his head and get the choke.
10/30/07 11:47 PM
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m.g
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Edited: 30-Oct-07 10:55 PM
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 5604
Robert Pereira, who wrties excellent articles about his training experience in Brazil, asked a well-known Bjj instructor about stalling. The answer he got was fairly simple and logical. The reality is if you go against someone who stalls while in your guard then ultimately that person is only hurting himself and defeating the purpose of training bjj in the first place. Such a person is really not learning nor perfecting anything because he is NOT really doing anything. One of the functions and purposes of sparring, particularly in the academy or school where one trains, is to actually use and apply the techniques and tactics one has learned. If a person, when sparring, is constantly playing a defensive game then he is ultimately wasting his own time and effort. Robert Pereira, in his article, stated the instructor simply informed the staller he is wasting his own time and effort and adviced the other person to train with some one else.

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