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AcademicGround >> Can I get into MIT...


1/30/08 1:44 PM
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submit2peace
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Edited: 30-Jan-08
Member Since: 10/29/2005
Posts: 223
 
...or any top tier business school with these stats... Undergrad GPA: 2.3 Grad GPA in Accounting: 3.8 GMAT: 700 Do you think my G-GPA and GMAT will offset my undergrad?
2/2/08 7:33 PM
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AaronU
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Edited: 02-Feb-08
Member Since: 09/26/2003
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Where did you do you undergrad?
2/4/08 7:00 AM
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FiatLux
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Edited: 04-Feb-08
Member Since: 03/12/2002
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Isn't it pretty much the norm that you need at least a 2.0 overall GPA to even graduate? No disrespect, but hopefully there is more to this story.
2/4/08 10:34 AM
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submit2peace
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Edited: 04-Feb-08 10:40 AM
Member Since: 10/29/2005
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"Isn't it pretty much the norm that you need at least a 2.0 overall GPA to even graduate? No disrespect, but hopefully there is more to this story." you lost me...a 2.3 is higher than a 2.0 minimum... oh and to answer the other poster, my undergrad is from Rutgers and grad from U of Buffalo
2/5/08 5:26 AM
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FiatLux
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Edited: 05-Feb-08 05:32 AM
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Clearly I did lose you. You have a GPA that will barely allow you to graduate (ask yourself if that's supposed to be impressive or noteworthy). Yet you're asking about getting into one of the best schools in the country? Graduate admissions classes are usually quite small. So in your case, I'm wondering how many people with a 4.0, Phi Beta Kappa, and summa cum laude status you're expecting to beat out for a slot? There must be something else that you've done with your time to make you believe getting in MIT is a realistic possibility. I've looked at hundreds of graduate programs, and the absolute lowest GPA requirement is 2.75. Usually, if you send an application with less than a 3.0 to most places they'll simply throw it in the trash.
2/5/08 9:19 AM
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submit2peace
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Edited: 05-Feb-08 09:24 AM
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^^^^did you miss the whole thing about my graduate GPA?? that's the whole point of starting this discussion...can my GRADUATE GPA and GMAT be enough for them to overlook that... Why would I apply with only my undergrad creds?
2/5/08 10:35 AM
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rls99
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Edited: 05-Feb-08
Member Since: 07/19/2005
Posts: 25
Honestly, I wouldn't think so. When looking at the best schools, let alone top-tier schools, the competition will just be too fierce. The other candidates will have stellar undergrad gpas, and quite a few will probably have stellar grad gpas like yourself. Of the ones with no grad school, great gpas coming out of the Ivy League or other very well respected institutions will be hard to compete with. That being said, I would think that plenty of fine schools would overlook your your undergrad in light of your graduate performance and GMAT.
3/4/08 2:51 AM
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Alabama Man
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Edited: 04-Mar-08
Member Since: 05/04/2006
Posts: 687
no.
3/4/08 12:59 PM
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RTWu
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Edited: 04-Mar-08
Member Since: 01/01/2001
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Are you an underrepresented minority?  Actually, either way the answer is no.
3/6/08 1:19 PM
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TUF Noobiest
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Edited: 06-Mar-08
Member Since: 04/02/2007
Posts: 1247
Are business schools as gay as law schools when it comes to only caring about you UGPA and not your grad GPA? Every place I looked for info when I was 17 said that taking a tough major at a tough school was better than taking an easy major and getting a 4.0 at a joke school. Lies!!!!
3/6/08 3:59 PM
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Açaí
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Edited: 06-Mar-08
Member Since: 12/25/2002
Posts: 3540

congrats on the gmat score.  you're grad gpa will redeem your undergraduate gpa.  just mention maybe why your undergrad gpa was low.  you will be fine.  you are game for any school of your dreams.

 

 

7/19/08 4:51 AM
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GrandInquisitor
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MIT might be a tough sell, but it all depends on what field you are planning to go into. Admissions to the B school at MIT might be different, but a close friend of mine went there to study neuroscience and Math, and from everything he has said to me it seems that MIT is one of the hardest schools to get into because they place such a high emphasis on recruiting students that can transition from graduation to working in a lab to make new and better gear for the military to blow up other countries with (MIT is could be re-named MIC ---Military Industrial Complex).

As far as MIT goes, your grad GPA is very good, as is your GMAT, but your undergrad GPA is not so hot. This could possibly work in your favor because it could show serous personal growth. Also, what kind of work have you done outside of class? Have you worked closely with your professors or fellow students on any special research projects or experiments? Have you done any serious work in the community as an activist or volunteer? If you have, these could be very strong indicators that you have matured and become more intellectually curious and are a dedicated and motivated person (which is exactly what MIT, or any other school worth its muster for that matter, wants).

If you have done a good amount of close work with a few professors, having them write recommendation letters for you could be HUGE in the admissions process, especially if you are applying to a Ph.D program (at least in my field, rec letters and work samples are key to grad admissions).

I'm not an expert on B school admissions, but I know one of the most important (if not *the* most important) piece of information on your application is the real world work experience you have accumulated between your graduation and when you applied. The B schools at Northwestern, Indiana U, Penn, and Stanford won't even look at you unless you have had a minimum of 3-5 years of real world experience.

Also, going to prestige schools isn't always the best option. Look around at what schools are strongest in your field and then look for professors that you would like to work with -- sometimes you end up with a list of ultra-selective schools, but often times certain schools with less "brand value" have elite programs (often better than bigger and more expensive schools) that allow you to specialize to exactly what you want to study and work MUCH closer with faculty than at the "name brand" schools.

I hope this helps.


Also, good luck in finding the right school!
7/28/08 12:51 PM
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asdf
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but a close friend of mine went there to study neuroscience and Math, and from everything he has said to me it seems that MIT is one of the hardest schools to get into because they place such a high emphasis on recruiting students that can transition from graduation to working in a lab to make new and better gear for the military to blow up other countries with (MIT is could be re-named MIC ---Military Industrial Complex).



Does he really think that all the profs (many which can't stand each other and aren't even born in America) in all the different departments (which can't stand each other) all come together on this single issue because they want to build the American Military complex together?


Your friend is a conspiracy nut.
7/30/08 3:00 AM
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GrandInquisitor
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It's not a conspiracy at all - hell, anyone that is the least bit resourceful can look around at state department, DOD, and Pentagon budgets and see how much money is going into military R&D, and then you can look at the grants and funding that is bestowed across almost every department at MIT.


There are plenty of professors, lecturers, scientists, students, and workers at MIT who are ardently against American imperialism, but they value their work and research so they compartmentalize their day to day scientific work from the the end result , which generally involves some sort of military application.

It's entirely the same as a large swath of grads coming out of good physics and engineering graduate programs that hire in at Los Alamos (and there are always positions available) - they don't go there thinking that they are going to work on new and improved ways of delivering nuclear payloads, but rather they just think of it as the best avenue for them to carry out their scientific research. In fact, most of the early physicists working on the Trinity project (including Feynman) rationalized their work this way, and it was only after their work eradicated millions of lives did they begin to question what they had done.


Again, I'd like to be clear about something - as with most matters where the government or military teams with private industry, (the mercenary business not withstanding) there are no conspiracies at play. A great deal of information is either already available or available through FOIA request. The reason most people don't know about what happens isn't because of nefarious conspiracies, but rather because the corporate media is half complicit and half lazy and useless, and because most people are all-together uninterested and unwilling to invest the work required to investigate.
7/30/08 8:17 AM
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asdf
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Edited: 07/30/08 8:29 AM
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"There are plenty of professors, lecturers, scientists, students, and workers at MIT who are ardently against American imperialism, but they value their work and research so they compartmentalize their day to day scientific work from the the end result "

Every other schools accepts grad students because they want to publish papers. They "compartmentalize" their admissions to the best students with the best research records. But MIT is different - they accept grad students with building the US military complex in mind. Right.

Maybe you or your friend, think the National Science Foundation or National Institute of Health or Department of Energy is some huge military complex. But you'd both be in the definite minority. The minority known as conspiracy nuts who talk about "corporate media", "American Imperialism", and "Mercenary business".


and loL@ your Los Alamos example. Out of a class of 40 engineering grad students, how many go to national labs permanently? (hint, the answer is close to '1'). National labs are always hiring because people don't want to go there. The national labs have a culture of non-production that sinks careers. Ask your MIT friend - if he's done his scouting he'll know that. Or maybe he was only an undergrad there and won't know.


Also, you're wrong about one thing. MIT doesn't need to "recruit students" at the grad level to build the military complex. The MIT name recruits itself. Places like Michigan or Wisconsin or Texas need to "recruit students".

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