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Food & Wine Ground >> Affraid to cook FISH ....


6/14/08 2:03 AM
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SE7ENFOLD
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I'n never sure when fish is cooked. All i see when watching all those chef shows, most of the fish is lightly searedon each side and looks raw in the middle (mahimahi, tuna steak) that throws me off!

I wanna try sword fish, but afraid that it wont get cooked properly.


Whats the best way to cook fish?

What fish's DONT need to be cooked all the way through?


HELP PLEASE, I wanna add more seafood to my diet, my wifes, and introduce my little boy to different flavors and textures early.
6/14/08 10:28 AM
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crescentwrench
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Open can of salmon, mix with egg and crushed crackers, pan fry.  That was about the extent of fish at my house growing up and I haven't progressed much beyond that.  I can do tuna okay because you're just basically charring the outside.  If you undercook it who cares.  But I'm right there with you.  You're supposed to be able to tell by how the meat flakes if it's done, if it goes opaque etc.  Plus for the rare or raw fish, which have been handled so they're safe to eat that way?  Especially for the young kids. 
 
I've veered away from fish this whole time because of all those reasons and because it's so expensive to mess up with. 
 
When I get settled in to my new house I'm going to try some fish stuff.  I figure the method I'm going to try first is poaching.  That seems easiest to get a decent product from.  It's slow so you don't have to time it perfectly and it's wet so it will be more forgiving.  Plus you can use different mediums, water or oil n' stuff.  As to recipes I'm just gonna farm epicurious and gourmetsleuth.
6/14/08 4:55 PM
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Mit
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I usually go by the flake rule or whether or not it's still translucent. I don't cook a ton of fish though. Salmon is pretty much the extent of my fish cooking and it's pretty hard to mess up. It doesn't take long to cook and easy to see when it's done.
6/15/08 2:32 AM
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Zoso
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I did some swordfish on the grill last summer. It was great. It is definitely just a guessing game as far as I am concerned. I would guess you have to cook it a ton to get good at it.
6/18/08 1:05 PM
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alxholic
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 love fish.   it is a lot of try until you get it right though.  
6/25/08 12:23 AM
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WizzleTeatsv2
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I grill and broil swordfish and tuna a lot--salmon too.

The best I can tell you is to experiment. Eventually you'll be able to time it pretty well. If you get really high quality sushi-grade fish it won't matter, but that shit is pricey. Worth it, but pricey.

I like to use a little extra virgin olive oil, sea salt and pepper--I coat the fish in it before I put in on the grill or in the broiler. It is pretty forgiving and really helps keep the fish nice and tender.

Do NOT cook a piece of fish until it is completely done in the middle, that is overcooked. Take it off when the middle is still a little bit rare (or raw if you like it that way). The heat retained in the meat will cook it the rest of the way without drying it out too much.

And for a quick salmon meal--take a baking pan and a good sized piece of salmon, 1-2lbs. Stick it in the middle of the pan.

Fill the pan with extra-pulpy OJ to about 1/2-1 inch deep--enough to cover at least the fish most of the way.

Stick it in the oven at 350 for about 10 minutes. It kicks ass and is dead easy, especially if you have kids and need to make something quick.
9/29/08 8:17 PM
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Mark1
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 I do fish all the time.  RIght now  I have in the freezer

2 kinds of salmon
2 kinds of Mahi mahi
Orange roughy
rainbow trout
scallops
shrimp
Swordfish
Albacore tuna
Ahi tuna
Halibut

Typically, I will grill them with S&P and olive oil.  I'll sear the tuna, halibut and scallops in a pan.

You can sear the tuna and leave it medium rare.  That's the best way.

Mark
10/3/08 8:57 AM
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Lou Dukes
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I cook a lot of fish because it's quick and easy. I do mostly fillets, and I always go with the flake rule. It's the easiest to explain and to understand, ask my wife.

So you should know fish is cooked when the meat flakes easily and loses its translucence. If you're baking, broiling, grilling, steaming or poaching fillets, steaks or whole fish, use a 10-minute rule. Measure the fish at its thickest point. Cook it 10 minutes per inch of thickness at 450 degrees F, turning halfway through the cooking time. Add five minutes if cooking in foil or a sauce. Double the cooking time for frozen fish that hasn't been thawed.

If you're not sure about time just check it and then check it again.
10/3/08 12:45 PM
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GaryG
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I wrecked three pieces of tuna last weekend by overcooking. 2 1/2 minutes each side in a broiler set high and it was overcooked. If there's a next time I'll pan sear.

Salmon, walleye and trout I can grill OK.
10/6/08 9:17 AM
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canuck34
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I cook fish all the time. Swordfish is a bit harder to judge because most fish you can tell is done by seeing if it flakes when touched with a fork. Swordfish is more "steaklike", but still not hard. Just google "cooking swordfish" and you can find how much time to grill or broil each side depending on the thickness.

If you want a surefire amazing way to cook just about any kind of fish, here you go.

Place a piece of fish that works with pretty much anything other than tuna...(well it works with tuna but that would be a waste!)

Place fillet on a large piece of foil. Over the fish put a bit of olive oil, lemon juice, some chopped onion, a thin slice of lemon and a thin slice of tomato plus any spices of your choice (dill for salmon for instance). Fold up foil to enclose the fish. Bake at 425. About 10 minutes for thin sliced fillets like haddock etc...and 20 minutes for thicker sliced ones like salmon etc...

Enjoy.
10/6/08 11:10 AM
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Tys
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I planked a Salmon Fillet this weekend, easy stuff.

Soak Cedar Plan in water for an hour (you can use also use some juice or beer in with the water if you like).

Get the grill to 450-500ish, throw the board on until it starts smoking, probably a couple of minutes.

At this point you should have a fillet no skin, I put a mixture of seasoning on top of the fillet, but whatever you like.

Throw it on the smoking board for 15 minutes, pull it off and it's eating time. You'll need to check on the board a couple of times during the process in case you get a flare-up... I have yet to have it happen, but if it does just spray it with water.

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