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Jen >> MBF- Transitions: Muscles to Principles


8/5/08 4:33 PM
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Bolo
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This was a brief article written recently by MBF creator, Geoff Gluckman. I thought would a good read for people here because on the BJJ, Health & Medical, and S&C forums, I often see people say things like "The reason for this problem is because XXX muscle is tight".

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Many healthcare professionals, whether new or seasoned with, employing the Muscle Balance and Function Development® (MBF®) education system fall into a typical trap—trying to assess and correct body misalignment through an analysis of muscle imbalances.

I’m sure you know those familiar questions: Which muscles are too tight? Which are too weak?

This thinking stems from traditional rehabilitation education received in most institutions of higher learning. No one can fault such training as it makes sense on a surface level. However, deeper inspection reveals serious flaws with this type of body re-alignment (posture correction) process.

First, there are somewhere between 600-800 muscles in the body, depending on the source referenced. This makes an effective evaluation difficult, especially without expensive electromyographic (EMG) equipment being attached to motor points.

Second, even if applied to one quadrant with more finite muscle groups, the body and its lever systems work as a unit, not in isolation.

Third, and perhaps most importantly, the muscles take direction from neurological impulses, which predominantly receive cues from proprioceptive receptors, such as golgi tendon organs, located throughout the body. Furthermore, body position in relation to the force of gravity plays a big part in proprioceptive responses. Thus, simply applying exercises to strengthen weak muscles and stretches for tight ones would probably result in less than long lasting outcomes.

Within MBF®, a principle-based system of education, the laws of physics (Newtonian) are tailored to re-educate the body back to proper alignment, bio-mechanical function, and neuromuscular function through proper exercise selection and sequencing.

This is what differentiates the MBF® system from other systems of exercise. Choosing appropriate exercises without proper sequencing is like having the proper tools to build a house and then applying them in the wrong order. For instance, hammering wood together before properly sizing the pieces for construction.
10/4/08 2:21 PM
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Eel
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Edited: 10/04/08 2:20 PM
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Michael, Did you read Egoscue's "Pain Free"? Any thoughts?
10/4/08 3:12 PM
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Edited: 10/04/08 3:15 PM
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Yes, I have read it. It gives a good general idea of how posture effects numerous aspects of your health, however, the exercises he shows for problems with different body parts is no good. It's not about, "if this hurts, do this exercise". That's not how the therapy works and he knows it. He structured and presented the book like that because he knew what is how the general public thinks, so he made the book that way to sell more books (that was told to me by people at the Egoscue clinic).
10/4/08 5:05 PM
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Eel
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Edited: 10/04/08 5:05 PM
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My understanding is that this book, "The Egoscue Method of Health Through Motion: Revolutionary Program That Lets You Rediscover the Body's Power to Rejuvenate It", does more of a posture analysis and builds a program from there. I have been doing Egoscue for a few years and I am trying to understand exactly what and how the programs are being designed. Do you have any book suggestions along these lines?
10/4/08 5:47 PM
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That other book you mentioned also continues to give a good overview, however, it is still inaccurate because people no longer fit into the 3 posture categories that are mentioned. Each person's postural issues are unique, so there is no way you can just say that they are Condition 1, 2, or 3.

In my experience with the Egoscue course and with talking to numerous Egoscue practitioners, there is no logic or science to how they choose exercises and design programs. I know of people who have spent over $10,000 on the Egoscue education programs and they can't give me a straight answer on how they choose exercises and put together programs. That is why I sought out MBF and that is why so many Egoscue practitioners have also sought out MBF. Most Egoscue practitioners simply try to figure things out by trial and error.
10/4/08 6:07 PM
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Eel
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Edited: 10/04/08 6:08 PM
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That is the impression I get. I have gotten some good results from my trainer, but he can't seem to give me a good formula for how he designs things. He does a lot of gait analysis and standing posture analysis and he watches me perform some basic lifts. I would like to be able to recognize issues and address them on my own.
10/4/08 6:17 PM
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The gait analysis and functional movement tests are not necessary. The standing posture tells me everything. Egoscue practitioners do those other tests, but I don't see the point because no Egoscue practitioner or trainer has been able to explain to me what direct correlation those tests have to do with choosing exercises and designed the program. In addition, the postural analysis that the Egoscue practitioners do isn't completely accurate too. You're going to have a tough time with posture therapy when the postural analysis is missing some information.
10/4/08 7:07 PM
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Eel
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Are you referring to the postural analysis when they have you stand in front of a line and they take photos of you?
10/4/08 9:18 PM
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Edited: 10/05/08 12:42 AM
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Photos aren't really necessary if you are doing the postural analysis in person. But, yes, that's what I'm referring to. For a complete postural analysis, there must be things which need to be checked which cannot be determined from photos which Egoscue practitioners don't check for.
10/4/08 11:14 PM
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Eel
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Any thoughts on Z Health? I have done one session with a Z Health instructor.
10/5/08 12:47 AM
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I am not familiar with that system.
12/6/08 7:12 PM
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nowaydo
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Z Health is a decent program.

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