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DantheWolfMan UnderGround >> Att. Tony


3/7/02 8:32 AM
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nowaydo
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
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It makes a lot of sense! Thanks, Robert V.
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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Tony Blauer
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
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Blauer Tactical Systems, Inc.
Its an interesting question, that I will answer in two ways, first by referencing the science of the SPEAR System and second by stating another observation I've noted for years... As to your question 'why?', no doubt all the martial scientists will have theory and a hypothesis, connected to muscle-memory this, kinematic that, but the long & short of it boils down to something you recently discovered regarding the SPEAR SYSTEM: at the end of the day it wont mean a thing because 'observable reality' is more compelling than 'Theoretical fact'! EMotional/Psychological pressure creates stress and pressure on bio-mechanic finesse. ANy system that fails to integrate this behavioral truth is doomed to fail in certain conditions. [COnditions is an operative component to experimentation. Dojo = Lab, whereas MMA fighting is not the DOjo]. Further, wIthout the Ballistic Micro-fight model [a recipe for stress testing and exploring 'condition & options' under pressure], any fighter is likely to revert to old habits.... For PArt 2 of your answer, I have always maintained that 'we' gravitate to systems/styles that most resonate with our personalities, hence, the core system, the one we most invest in is closer to a 'persona-do' and under duress [fatigue/fear] we revert to that we are most familiar with... This of course is muddled with primal & gross motor considerations [due to fatique, fear, stress etc.] so what we are left with is your observation: an athlete who when pressed passed their 'training line' experiences 'stress' rather than 'challenge' [in case of challenge, said athlete likely raises his/her level] the stressed athlete reverts to that which is familiar [the oldest, longest muscle-memory investment] blended with the primal symptoms of stress [holding, hesitating, over-effort [i.e. swinging wildly, off-balance kicking, etc.] Make sense? T
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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nowaydo
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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Tony, I’ve noticed that many NHB fighters cannot free themselves from their original artform(wrestling, BJJ, striking) enough to display the skills of a complete fighter, “in the heat of battle”. I know these guys train for weeks, months and in some cases years to add another aspect of combat to their game, yet when a strong challenge appears, they revert back to their former art. Examples: Royce Gracie looked very good striking against Sak, initially, but when he got tired he became the same BJJ player you saw in the first UFC. The same goes for Coleman, Kerr, Tito, Igor….and so on. The reason I use NHB fighters as an example is we have no data on “streetfighters” and their backgrounds. The most successful people seemed to be the ones who had no solid foundation in a fighting art before and the Japanese do very well adapting. Have you done any research on this problem? Why some are successful and others are not? What is the physiological rationale for this phenomenon? I know it’s more than simply training in another art, for most of them do. If it's the "how" you train, then how do you? Where is the psychological breakdown? Or am I seeing something that really isn't there? Thanks, Robert V.

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