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Health & Medical UnderGround >> Tennis Elbow?


10/4/08 5:50 PM
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higgo69
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Member Since: 3/16/07
Posts: 15
 
Just lately my right elbow has started to hurt. Asked and showed the tennis trainer at the school where i work and he said its tennis elbow. It bloody kills but i dont know whats caused it as my training hasnt changed much, just muay thai 3 to 4 days a week and no great increase in training or intensity. I know about increasing load gradually as i have run alot in the past and i really can not put it down to that. I dont think its overuse but i still know rest is probably the best answer. I have a manual job and young children so rest is hard to come buy.
Just wondering if anybody has any ideas on easing the pain.

The pain does go away after warming it up but i pay for it twice the next day and i get no understanding at home so no care is coming from there.

Thanks
10/7/08 11:37 AM
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jude099
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i get tennis elbow (tendinitis) if i train too hard. just feels like a headache in my elbow.

time heals it.
10/10/08 11:06 AM
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martinburke
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It's pain on the elbow on the opposite side from the funny bone,right?

Tennis elbow(lateral epicondylitis) can be caused by the repetitive grasping of objects like a computer mouse, a tennis racket, or tools. Repetitive pronation or supination of the forearm/wrist can also cause it. Holding static positions, like using a mouse, or requiring the wrist and hand extensors to be under constant isometric contraction(like using a hammer) is enough to cause tissue degeneration.

Now, everybody calls it tendinitis, but most cases are actually tendinosis. So it's really not an inflammatory condition. It's a chronic collagen degenaration in the extensor tendons and irritation at the tendon attachment sites at the lateral epicondyle of the humerus.

A good massage therapist trained in rehab massage can help. The techniques the terapist will use will include deep cross fiber friction directly to the affected tendons to stimulate collagen production in the damaged tendon fibers. See, by the time the condition got to the point where it was impacting you, it was chronic and collagen was already deteriorated. So now, the inflammatory process has to be kick-started to get your body to start healing itself.

Deep longitudinal stripping , myofascial techniques, and massage with active engagement to the wrist extensors all help restore the wrist extensors.

These techniques can be... uncomfortable:), so get a massage therapist to show them to you. Otherwise, you can end up doing more harm than good.

It can be a slow healing process.

Hope this helps.
10/12/08 2:16 AM
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JasonE
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Member Since: 12/28/07
Posts: 83
Good advice from martinburke! Pretty much spot on. I've treated some cases and recovery can be quick.

If repetitive use is the likely culprit, simple changes like switching what hand you use for your computer mouse, etc. can help. Once massage helps kickstart the healing process, some gentle stretching of the arm muscles can be very helpful. I recommend Active Isolated Stretching, and you can find practitioners via www.stretchingusa.com - or just do a Google search for your local area. AIS is good for self-stretching, but it helps to have someone show you how to do it, and which stretches to focus on so you aren't wasting time on those that won't help.

Best wishes for a quick recovery!

Jason Erickson
www.CSTMinnesota.com
10/12/08 3:50 PM
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higgo69
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Member Since: 3/16/07
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Thanks for the advice fellas i think you are on to something as i haven't increased the load in training lately and i am getting older 42 in fact so what you say makes alot of sense. I have watched what i do carefully with each arm lately and have noticed certain movements that cause pain. As well as that i have always given stretching a wide berth (wasting time)and after years of using machinery of an impact or vibrating nature i guess im reeping what ive sowed. Thanks again for your advice.
10/15/08 1:44 AM
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JasonE
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Member Since: 12/28/07
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If you're looking for a structured, full-body approach to increasing pain-free mobility and improving your recovery, try the Intu-Flow program from RMAX. I've used it for years, and at 37 I'm still seeing steady gains in my training without significant DOMS.

More info here: http://cstminnesota.com/4.html

Happy training!

Jason Erickson
www.CSTMinnesota.com
10/20/08 5:19 PM
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WaltJ
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It's annoying, but I don't think it's anything to worry about in the long run.  If/when mine acts up, I usually just apply some ice and take a couple of ibuprofin.  As was said before though, rest is the best method, and it'll probably subside within a few days.

If it bothers you a lot, either take a day off from Muay Thai, or go and work on your footwork and teep kicks or something.

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