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TMA UnderGround >> Training your whole life?


11/16/08 1:41 PM
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BigJimmy54
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What are do you believe is the best for overall self defense and I can train in for years?

Here is my problem, I love the traditional martial arts and mma and have trained in both. However, I have to be realistic and know that I most likely will not be putting on a head gear to spar when I am 40 (27 now), I am looking for an art where I can still be training at 50, 60.

I work in law enforcement and am looking for something that is practical as well. I was thinking about getting back into karate, focusing on shidokan.

Any honest advice would be appreciated

Thank you
11/16/08 6:43 PM
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LeftBench
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My honest advice is to train in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. Helio just turned 95 and is still training.
11/17/08 1:55 AM
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shen
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BECAUSE you are in Law Enforcement, I would say Judo or Sambo. Shidokan is awesome, but I don't see it as quite as valuable for a police officer.

I just think grappling training is SO important for people in law enforcement.

BJJ is great too (and a little more gentle, due to the relative lack of throws) and you can train BJJ for a long time if you train smart, but the standing Grappling in Judo or Sambo is more important for a cop.

No matter what art you do though, you WILL have to adjust the way you train as you get older. That's just part of life.

Just my .02.
11/17/08 10:27 AM
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LeftBench
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I agree that Judo/Sambo is important for a cop. I too am a police officer and feel that BJJ is the best overall martial art. But I also train Judo and feel that it is great too.

Really you have lots of choices here. I say go with any martial art you enjoy. As you get older, just start to take things lighter.
11/18/08 4:31 AM
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smileythai
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^Agreed. Doesn't really matter what you train because you're gonna play rough while you're young and relax when you're older. The body can only take so much.

That said, I think grappling arts can be trained/used effectively throughout a lifetime. My judo coach was in his early 60's when I started training with him and he still moved well on the mat despite his age and some serious injuries(not judo related).

11/25/08 8:44 PM
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Oyama
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If you remain in solid physical condition by training regularly and living clean you can train hard into your 40's. I am living proof at 43 after 26 years of training! I feel strong and have no problem with many guys half my age. I spar stand-up at least once a week (kickboxing or knock down rules) and roll at BJJ and/or submission wrestling/MMA at least twice each week. The trick is to train intelligently and vary intensity all the while listening to your body.

Train with intense passion- intelligently...

SAM
11/30/08 12:25 AM
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spc36
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http://www.isrmatrix.org

This is all you need!
12/3/08 1:35 PM
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Luigipe
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I work a lot everyday but somedays train twice per week, i have a lot of years in TMA and MMA i am in good physical condition i am in 36 and i am feel ok.
And participate in tournaments against younger oponents,may be until 40 i hope, but is prefered avoid a bit because the injures can stop , the best is train intelligently and with diferent intensity.
Good luck and be with God.
12/3/08 3:24 PM
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Outkaster
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Well yes and no for me. I have arthritis in 3 vertebrae that cause me to loose sleep and really hurt sometimes. 8 years of Judo also did not help along with a shoulder injury. Taking falls definitely was harder. There are some guys that can train for years and I think they are blessed genetically but in your 40’s it takes a lot longer to recover. My knees are pretty shot from TKD/kickboxing for so many years. I can hang with most of the kids sparring at the college I workout at which is good.
12/3/08 11:30 PM
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LeftBench
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I have to respectfully disagree with Already in Use and say that I feel Hapkido and Aikido are terrible for practical self defense for an LEO. BJJ, Judo, Muay Thai, and Wrestling would suit you much better.

If you're just looking to train something to stay in shape then any martial art will be fine.
12/5/08 5:18 PM
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JesseL
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Edited: 12/05/08 5:19 PM
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Id say for a police officer Id look for Japanese Jiu-Jitsu. My brother is an officer and a bjj guy and he took a guy down on the street and got stabbed 6 times from another guy while he was grappling with the other. Or id say combine the two Japanese and Brazilian JJ. To rely on a ground system in a street where there is mpre then one person is asking for trouble. Already In Use makes some good suggestions.
12/6/08 7:32 PM
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twinkletoesCT
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I second the suggestion to train JJJ and BJJ.

I think Judo is wonderful, especially for LEO, but it's rough on the body, especially in the long term.

A good diet of BJJ (for dynamic training) and JJJ (or Small circle, or AikiJJ, or Chin Na, etc) would be a great mix of appropriate tactics and training over time.
12/8/08 3:31 PM
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FutureProdigy
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my judo senseis are 56 and 70, both still train. My kyokushin senseis are in their late 40s and early 50s! Both of these arts are some of the roughest on the body too! It just depends on the individual and if their willing to put in the time to stretch everyday, etc.
12/9/08 4:32 PM
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GaydarBlane
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"my judo senseis are 56 and 70, both still train. My kyokushin senseis are in their late 40s and early 50s! Both of these arts are some of the roughest on the body too! It just depends on the individual and if their willing to put in the time to stretch everyday, etc. "

And how many of their fellow students from when they started still train and didn't get injured? The old people that are still training hard are the exception rather than the rule.
12/13/10 12:07 PM
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Seul
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I met a guy recently who learned ishin-ryu in his early 20's (got to brown belt, i think) and has been practicing it virtually every day for more than 20 years.

He is in awesome shape, very flexible (could do very low stances, kick very high with good control and coult just leave his foot hanging in the air, etc), pretty strong, and could punch/kick with a great deal of speed and power.

I don't know how well he can fight (i know he sparred back when he was learning, but I think he has had relatively few training partners in the years since), but he's keep himself in remarkable shape jut doing his katas and pretty standard conditioning/stretching stuff on a daily basis.

It made me start to think about longevity a lot, I turned 25 a month ago (I know, I'm SOOOOOO old) and have managed to accrue my first set of "old aches/pains" from past injuries.

I love boxing, but all the older boxers I see slur their words at least a little bit. I'm never going to have this as anything more than a hobby, so I'm trying to modify my training a little to allow me to keep it up for a long time.
12/16/10 9:04 PM
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cdueck
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Why can't you spar when you are 40? I am 37 and I ache all the time but I still spar regularly. I train Kyokushin and grappling I hope to have my first Muay Thai fight in 6 months or so. As long as you stay fit and don't ignore injuries there is no reason why you can't spar almost indefinitely. As you get older you might have to pick your sparring partners a little better but age is no reason to stop.
12/16/10 9:04 PM
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cdueck
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Why can't you spar when you are 40? I am 37 and I ache all the time but I still spar regularly. I train Kyokushin and grappling I hope to have my first Muay Thai fight in 6 months or so. As long as you stay fit and don't ignore injuries there is no reason why you can't spar almost indefinitely. As you get older you might have to pick your sparring partners a little better but age is no reason to stop.
12/16/10 9:04 PM
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cdueck
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Why can't you spar when you are 40? I am 37 and I ache all the time but I still spar regularly. I train Kyokushin and grappling I hope to have my first Muay Thai fight in 6 months or so. As long as you stay fit and don't ignore injuries there is no reason why you can't spar almost indefinitely. As you get older you might have to pick your sparring partners a little better but age is no reason to stop.
12/16/10 9:04 PM
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cdueck
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Why can't you spar when you are 40? I am 37 and I ache all the time but I still spar regularly. I train Kyokushin and grappling I hope to have my first Muay Thai fight in 6 months or so. As long as you stay fit and don't ignore injuries there is no reason why you can't spar almost indefinitely. As you get older you might have to pick your sparring partners a little better but age is no reason to stop.
12/16/10 9:07 PM
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cdueck
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sorry about that.
12/23/10 9:37 AM
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Outkaster
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It's not always that people are lazy, it is the fact your body can't do what it once did. What if you have trained 30 plus years and have injuries that sidelined you? Lazy is not always what it is, people get older.
12/23/10 5:51 PM
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cdueck
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Injuries do cause problems with training when you are a bit older but mostly it is just laziness. I have had quite a few injuries over the years but I am a fat ass right now because I won't put down the beer and go train. I am making a comeback but it is coming slow and some old injuries are making it slower but really I just need to get off the couch.
12/23/10 8:47 PM
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Skpotamus
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My instructor is pushing 60. He kickboxed as a pro, did bare knuckle karate, boxed as a pro, spent a large portion of his life in the marine corps. He kept up his physical conditioning to this day and still hangs with the young guys in the gym. He has slowed down, but his physical conditioning is great especially considering some of the injuries he's had (broken neck, broken back, shoulder surgery, knee surgery, elbow surgery, and a few others). Just keep on working out and stay in shape and you can keep doing what you love (martial arts) until the day you die.
12/24/10 8:32 AM
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Seul
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One of the boxing coaches I know is almost 60; he still coaches for several hours every day and is in fantastic shape. He's held mitts in one gym for more than an hour before without slowing down, I've seen him spar 15 rounds with new guys getting rotated in, and he can still knock out tons of dips and pullups. He has 120 fights or so between his amateur and pro career, he's pretty inspiring. Phone Post
1/21/11 9:05 PM
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Stubbsy
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 Trained since I was 8. Lots of coppers on here, Im a Police Officer over in England and I work a very busy town center. I've a 2nd dan in JJJ and am currently training in BJJ and the two compliment each other very well. I've got a 3rd Dan in freestyle karate too and the three together are very potent. I would say that the JJJ was what i have used the most during my service and can pin point three techniques that have served me very well (excuse the spelling).

waki gatame to takedown (stay holding the arm and you can cuff in the pin)
Osoto Gari (used all the time, especially pre-emptively)
and RNC - which even works against coked up squaddies (who in my experience are the hardest bastards in the world!)

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