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JKD UnderGround >> Who is your favourite JKD author?


4/4/09 1:13 PM
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PoundforPound
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Terri Tom's "The Straight Lead" is excellent.
4/11/09 4:48 AM
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Burton
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Thanks for including me in the list. Besides Bruce Lee and Dan Inosanto, I was greatly influenced by Paul Vunak's writings. He got me thinking. Then, of course, Matt Thornton's writing and our personal interaction was crucial to solidifying my path. Thanks Matt!
4/16/09 4:43 PM
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WidespreadPanic
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The biggest downfall to JKD, is that it some still have the mentality, that there are some secret ways or secret tricks which will enable a person to be a better fighter than his genetics allow. So they spend an inordinate amount of time 'working out' and doing things 'about' fighting. As I noted once before, when BL had trouble with the Kungfu guy what did he do, seek out more guys to fight of different styles and similar ability? No. He went back to solo training and tried to re-work his system. Fundamental flaw if you don't have BL's talent. An approach like that may have worked for him, but it won't work for the average person. Still, what BL should have done was go find a boxing gym and fight a bunch of different people knowing how much he learned from one fight that was over in a couple minutes. He didn't. Maybe he had the skill and understanding to work it out on his own; most don't, but I think that approach still survives in a large part of the JKD players.

While it's true that technique is important, as is strategy and tactics, there's no shortcut to actual fighting.

Thus, your average combative type sports guy, be it football or rugby, is almost always going to come out on top over a geek who's done some JKD seminars.

As Matt Thornton says, aggression and forward pressure and physicality and genetics is a very large part of the equation, other things being equal.

While the JKD guy is getting in his stance, the rugby guy, used to pain, used to combative sports type moves is going to run right over top of him.

Now, sure, teach the rugby guy some JKD and he'll be even better at it.
4/19/09 6:05 PM
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Paul Hopkins
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LOL

These posts are f'ing great!

btw, where did you get that, "Bros before Hoes", beanie? Classic douchebag apparel.

4/28/09 4:54 PM
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Burton
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Edited: 06/18/09 3:45 AM
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WSP, you make some good points. Many "Original JKD" guys only train in one system without much sparring, if any. Most "JKD Concepts" guys train with lots of different people/syles, but without much sparring. Many modern "JKD" guys, like myself, seek out lots of different guys to train and spar with.
As far as genetics go, the main thing is to do whatever you can to optimize your abilities, regardless of where you started from. If you end up against a guy with similar training and better genetics, oh well. That is why we must train better than most. Aloha!
4/29/09 4:55 AM
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Stone Rolled
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I wanna learn me some Jun Fan Gung Fu.
6/17/09 10:31 PM
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1911fanatic
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Burton

Matt

Guro Dan.

Vu-entertaining.
6/20/09 5:30 PM
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laqueus
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I really like Teri Tom's Straight Lead too. I'll pick it up every couple months, read through it, catch on something new to add to my game and improve it.
6/22/09 1:38 PM
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WidespreadPanic
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 On the topic of straight lead, keep in mind the lesson learned in fencing. If the attack can be made in a plane that is on the line of sight with no deviation, the opponent will have trouble engaging their depth perception, and can be made to misjudge the strike.

BTW, see google books for a pretty good excerpt of TT's book.



See
6/22/09 1:45 PM
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WidespreadPanic
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One thing to add...

The key here is understanding how the opponent judges and sees the incoming blow, be it straight punch, straight kick, hook punch or hooking kick. Learn what the opponet keys off of to judge the distance and timing and work on ways to thwart that or to confuse or trick it.

Just as in faking, where the opponent looks at the shoulder to discern the strike and the attacker uses a shoulder fake to deceive, there are other ways to be deceptive in striking.

You can deceive the angle, the angle of attack, the target, the timing, the distancing and other aspects.

In sparring when something works, stop and take the time to understand how it worked and why and try to incorporate the basic principles. It helps to video your sparring for this reason. In addition you can check your form and look for and eliminate 'tells'.


6/22/09 1:52 PM
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WidespreadPanic
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 Another thought. I find it helpful to use tape to mark out distances and areas on the floor of the training area. You can measure the distances required to bridge the gap and distances that should be covered with a single movement.

You can also learn to adapt to the range of your weapons, both armed and unarmed so that you can internalize these and eventually be able to remove the tape and still score reliably on the opponet.

Be aware that 'touch' range and 'scoring' range may be a bit different. See various videos put out by Ray Floro for more information.

(sorry for the multiple posts)

6/22/09 3:54 PM
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laqueus
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That's really cool! I'm not sure I'm anywhere near good enough to implement any of that yet, but I'm definitely going to think about it.
6/22/09 4:57 PM
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Joe Maffei
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It's kind of ironic, being called a favorite JKD Author. LOL. Being labeled, categorized and nicely put in a fixed position. I just find that amusing.
I would call them my favorite Authors and leave it at that:)
6/23/09 3:13 AM
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laqueus
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My favourite authors consist of Edgar Allen Poe, Lemony Snicket and such. Wouldn't too relevant in a JKD forum though.
6/24/09 12:43 PM
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Joe Maffei
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Nope, then again you wouldn't say them :)
6/26/09 9:16 PM
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iMercury
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personally i have never learned anything from JKD that wasn't already in either Bruce Lee's Tao of Jeet Kun Do, or Art of Expressing the Human Body. it seems people like the first book, but personally i learned the most from the latter. i am not very big on JKD anymore, i don't really see the purpose of learning it as a style in and of itself, but the philosophy of attack and the way you go about executing that is articulated very well in those 2 books i mentioned and i would recommend them even if you otherwise dislike JKD.
6/26/09 11:40 PM
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laqueus
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Art of Expressing the Human body is certainly good, although there are much better books on fitness now.
10/1/09 9:56 AM
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MobutuHari
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Terri Tom's Straight Lead is EXCELLENT BUT it gets into the pettiness I think of debating what is and isn't JKD in a certain part of the book (that stuff I think should be kept internally within the system - it just seems unprofessional to do that).

Aside from that the only stuff I've read that I like come from Bruce Lee himself, Dan Inosanto, Paul Vunak, and Burton. I really haven't read any newer things.
10/1/09 9:57 AM
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MobutuHari
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Btw, is John Little considered a JKD author by people? Art of Expressing the Human Body was a great book for the time I read it.
10/3/09 1:38 AM
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PoundforPound
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Terri Tom has a new JKD book out. Think I'll pick it up based on how good her first one was.

The politics are a bit petty, but the technical breakdowns coming out of the Ted Wong camp are worthy of being heard. More so than some of the "combat jeet kune do" and other such nonsense that was proliferating before.
10/3/09 8:47 AM
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laqueus
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What's it called?
10/3/09 1:50 PM
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PoundforPound
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Jeet Kune Do: The Arsenal of Self Expression
10/3/09 10:21 PM
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lautaro
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I have Terri's first book and I just scanned through the 2nd book. Her political views aside, her technical breakdown and ability to convey it in plain English for the layman is really good, imo. The 2nd book looked great as well.

In addition to the others previously named in this thread, I've also learned a lot from magazine articles by Steve Golden and Lamar Davis.

I also really liked the book by Tim Tackett & Chris Kent called Jeet Kune Do Kickboxing.

Joe Lewis' book How To Master Bruce Lee's Fighting System was also full of useful information, though I found Terri Tom's books more technically useful.

Lautaro
1/30/10 7:55 PM
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Wardance5
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dantheman - I recently dug out all my old martial arts magazines and I am really enjoying Burton Richardson's column from Inside Kung Fu and also any and all of Paul Vunak's articles.

I also recently picked up The Straight Lead by Teri Tom.

It's a really good book on the technique that is considered the foundation of JKD.

In some of those old magazines are interviews with 1st generation students and they all acknowledge Dan Inosanto's contributions.

There is comment sonewhere on this forum that said Dan was forced to stop using the name JKD?

Has he been ostracized from the Bruce Lee Foundation or something?

In my opinion, JKD as a fighting art has certain principles that need to be adhered to. Using those principles, you find your own path, discard the name and don't fuss over it like Bruce Lee said.

bruce lee is the best author of anything about jkd read "Tao of Jeet Kune Do" he explains so much and says how you need to creat your own way. he obviously has the greatest knowledge on it since he created it he was brilliant no one will ever come close to the skill he had in jkd or martial arts for that matter hence why he was never beaten in a fight.
1/30/10 9:42 PM
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Kai Tremeche
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Anything by John 'Superfan' Little.

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