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Food & Wine Ground >> Chinese Food???


1/6/09 2:18 PM
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jello
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Member Since: 1/13/03
Posts: 96
 
I purchased a wok last month and need some good recipes. Been cooking stir fry and it's pretty good but need something new. What kind of oil and what sauces ect......
Been using olive oil and just a little seaseme oil but it's loaded with fat. HELP PLEASE
1/6/09 6:50 PM
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d0mm3r
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peanut oil ftw

Sorry, that's all I got
1/6/09 9:05 PM
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Eel
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The problem with olive oil is that it can not handle the very high heat
that you use in wok cooking. Olive oil is best suited for dressings or
very low heat.

This link shows the different oils and their smoke points.

http://www.spectrumorganics.com/images/uploads/49623ec41cb5b.pdf
1/7/09 4:06 AM
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junon
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yeah i usually throw in olive oil only right before im about to pull the pan off the burner.
1/7/09 2:24 PM
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crescentwrench
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 I always keep coconut milk and cream and about 5 cans of curry paste on hand for not quite Thai dishes.  You can get those cans at probably any Asian store.  They have panang and massaman and "red", all kinds. 

Fry that curry for a bit in hot oil, toss in the coconut milk and then poach some diced chicken in the broth and you have a quick meal. 

Oh btw make sure your vent is on full blast or you have a window open or something when the curry goes down.  Unless you happen to enjoy getting maced. 
1/8/09 3:27 AM
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jaydub
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Edited: 01/08/09 3:30 AM
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I use vegetable oil with a touch of chili infused sesame oil.

Sesame oil is great because it can sustain very high heat.

Did you season your wok?

Fried Rice Recipe I like

1 cup of long grained rice cooled or use the day after
tsp cut up fresh ginger
tsp chopped garlic
tbl chopped cilantro
1-2 eggs
3 stalks of green onions
1 small onion
1/2 cup of peas
cup of chicken/pork/shrimp or all three
tbl of sesame oil
2tbl of vegtable oil
2tbl of oyster sauce
2 tbl of soy sauce

Turn burner on high heat add vegtable and sesame oil

optional****
add chicken/pork/shrimp once cooked remove and place in bowl to add later***

-add veg and sesame oil again
-add eggs, stir and move to the side of wok
-add garlic, onions and ginger
-add rice and stir/mix/flip
-add oyster suace and soy suace mix well
-add peas and cilantro
-mix in chicken/pork/shrimp
-just before ready to server add green onions

serve and enjoy.

Egg foo young next if you'd like.
1/8/09 9:03 AM
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crescentwrench
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Edited: 01/08/09 9:03 AM
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Just assume we want you to fire out the recipe from now on.  Because we do.  And keep going for as long as you like.  If you have an orange chicken or teriyaki or Chinese BBQ or whatever, just keep posting.  I'll keep trying them.

BTW jello, is your stove gas or electric?  I have electric and have little luck with woks.  One of these days I might get a turkey fryer and if I do I'll get a bigass wok to place in the ring that holds the pot over the flames and I'll be wokking and wolling like those little fellas in the back of the takeout places with their 5 foot wide pans. 
1/8/09 2:18 PM
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jaydub
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Thanks will do.

The thing I love most about Asian foods is that it's all pretty much flexible depending on what your pallet likes so in the recipes I give feel free to remove or substitue pretty much anything and its not going to ruin the dish(or it shouldn't:)).

feeds 4 people comfortably

egg foo young

-2-3 cloves of fresh garlic chopped
-small onion chopped
-2 stalks of green onions sliced
-green pepper chopped
-fresh bean sprouts
-6 eggs
-pork/chicken/shrimp
-4 tbl of vegtable oil
-1 tsp of sesame oil
-tbl of a corn starch
-1 cup of chicken or beef broth
-tsp salt
-tsp pepper
-2 tbl of soy sauce
-2 tbl of butter

Soak bean sprouts in cold water for 15 minutes remove and save 1 cup of the water for gravy

Add 2tbl of veg oil and 1/2tsp of sesame oil to hot wok.
add pork/chicken/shrimp until done
remove and set aside
remove and juices and place in bowl


beat eggs in a large mixing bowl
add your meat of choice, garlic, chopped onions, green peppers, green onions and bean sprouts(make sure the bean sprouts are patted dry with paper towel)and season with salt and pepper to taste and mix well.


add remaining oil 2tbl veg oil and 1/2 tsp of sesame oil to hot wok again.


Use a 1/2 cup measuring cup to scoop egg mixture into wok
This should form a small pattie and you should be able to to 3-4 patties at a time.
let cook for 1-2 minutes then flip
once cooked remove from wok and plate

You may need addition oil as the egg mixture likes to absorb oils so you also dont want to add too much.

If you're a multi tasker this will work great, if not prepare the gravy after you have cooked the meat but before you have made the egg foo young.


In a sauce pan, add the juices from the meat 2tbl of butter and then the corn starch creating a ru. Then add water from the drained bean sprouts, soy sauce and the chicken or beef broth.

Warm to a simmer and continue to wisk until a the gravy starts to thicken. Keep on low heat and poor over egg foo young when done.

enjoy
1/26/09 7:15 PM
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LeroyJ
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I use canola and a dash of peanut oil for flavor.

As far as Chinese sauces go, most of the flavors come from:

Soy Sauce
Oyster Sauce
Fish Sauce
Hot Sauce (or oil)

Dry ingredients:
Corn Starch
Sugar
5 spice

The rest is ingredients like garlic, veggies, fruits, meats etc.
2/22/09 9:50 AM
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Pustak
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This is a Gong Bao Jiding recipe from NPR that's tasty and pretty authentic:

Serves 2 as a main dish with a simple stir-fried vegetable and rice, 4 as part of a Chinese meal with three other dishes

2 boneless chicken breasts, with or without skin (about 2/3 pound total)

3 cloves of garlic and an equivalent amount of fresh ginger

5 scallions, white parts only

2 tablespoons peanut oil

a generous handful of dried red chiles (at least 10), preferably Sichuanese

1 teaspoon whole Sichuan pepper

2/3 cup roasted unsalted peanuts

For the marinade:

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons light soy sauce

1 teaspoon Shaoxing rice wine or medium-dry sherry

1 1/2 teaspoons potato flour or 2 1/4 teaspoons cornstarch

1 tablespoon water

For the sauce:

3 teaspoons sugar

3/4 teaspoon potato flour or 1 1/8 teaspoons cornstarch

1 teaspoon dark soy sauce

1 teaspoon light soy sauce

3 teaspoons Chinkiang or black Chinese vinegar

1 teaspoon sesame oil

1 tablespoon chicken stock or water

1. Cut the chicken as evenly as possible into 1/2-inch strips and then cut these into small cubes. Place in a small bowl and mix in the marinade ingredients.

2. Peel and thinly slice the garlic and ginger, and chop the scallions into chunks as long as their diameter (to match the chicken cubes). Snip the chiles in half or into 2-inch sections. Wearing rubber gloves, discard as many seeds as possible.

3. Combine the sauce ingredients in a small bowl -- if you dip your finger in, you can taste the sweet-sour base of the gong bao flavor.

4. Season the wok, then add 2 tablespoons of oil and heat over a high flame. When the oil is hot but not yet smoking, add the chiles and Sichuan pepper and stir-fry briefly until they are crisp and the oil is spicy and fragrant. Take care not to burn the spices (you can remove the wok from the heat if necessary to prevent overheating).

5. Quickly add the chicken and fry over a high flame, stirring constantly. As soon as the chicken cubes have separated, add the ginger, garlic, and scallions and continue to stir-fry for a few minutes until they are fragrant and the meat is cooked through (test one of the larger pieces to make sure).

6. Give the sauce a stir and add it to the wok, continuing to stir and toss. As soon as the sauce has become thick and shiny, add the peanuts, stir them in, and serve.

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