UnderGround Forums
 

Wrestling UnderGround >> Wrestling bridge dangerous?


4/3/09 8:08 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
skewbort
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 2/13/08
Posts: 2
 
I did a lot of neck bridging at the beginning of training a few days ago. I'm not used to this and am not very flexible. Then during sparring about an hour later I got a light knock on my forehead, then I felt something in my neck and what felt like an electric shock down both arms to my fingers. I got dizzy and had to sit down. A tingling in my fingers developed which turned to pain. I went to the hospital and they said I likely pinched a nerve, but it will take a few days for the pain to subside. I'm thinking the bridging had something to do with it. Am I right? Considering I'm only casually wrestling as a supplement to grappling, and I don't intend suplexing anyone, would I be better off not bridging at all?
4/6/09 2:03 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Saku12
1 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 12/19/07
Posts: 1667
start slowly and build up, good idea to have a strong neck regardless of what type of grappling you intend to do.
4/20/09 6:08 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Kirkor Papasian
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 4/14/08
Posts: 269
 be careful, warm up. get more flexible. hurting your neck is the last thing you want to do
4/23/09 1:27 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
cprevost
4 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 12/28/03
Posts: 401
If you are using wrestling to supplement grappling and aren't training for wrestling competition there is no need to bridge that way. The risks aren't worth the reward.
4/23/09 4:56 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Captain Awesome
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 4/20/09
Posts: 2
dont bridge straight to your neck. use your hands and knees to minimize the weight on your neck

lol @ "stack of dimes" :p
7/1/09 2:29 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
ECC170
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 6/5/07
Posts: 990
UrBloodOnMyFisT - stick with neck rolls,shrugs, you should of started with neck rolls before even jumping straight into full on bridges if you have a never before trained stack of dimes

hahaha love that stack of dimes line...use it all the time
7/1/09 2:59 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Ausgepicht
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 38170
The SOLE reason for a wrestlers bridge is to avoid the pin. That is why it's done the way it is. So unless you are wrestling and trying to not lose the match because your shoulder blades touched, there's no purpose for you to do it that way.
7/2/09 4:29 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
nowaydo
55 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 2/28/06
Posts: 1017
 "...So unless you are wrestling and trying to not lose the match because your shoulder blades touched, there's no purpose for you to do it that way..."
I agree. You only need to bridge to your shoulders or one shoulder in BJJ. Neck strength is crucial in Muay thai and boxing, but there are so many other (safer) ways to obtain that objective.
7/6/09 7:01 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Captain Awesome
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 4/20/09
Posts: 87
disagree

wrestlers strengthen their neck to avoid a pin yes, but also - and more imortently - to strengthen their necks

as said above, a strong neck decreases injuries in any dynamic sport with explosive motion. Bridging (safely) is the best second step in strengthening your neck. Once you've expanded that stack of dimes to a quarter or a loonie :p via isometric expercises, or even just roling around and having it get stronger, you can then start doing neck exercises like bridging.

THe most important part of it is that when something does happen to your neck (and it will if you do these sports like boxing, wrstling, grappling, judo. Even Football) the injury wont be dehabilitating.
7/10/09 1:27 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Ausgepicht
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 38286
CA, there are dozens of safer ways to strengthen your neck, and if you go to any wrestling gym in the country or world for that mater, you will see wrestler's doing them.

The bridge on the point of the head is a SPORT SPECIFIC exercise and NOT pivotal or necessary for developing a strong neck.

7/12/09 10:59 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
skewbort
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 2/13/08
Posts: 30
Yeah, because if a bjjer gets paralysed from bridging it's because they're a pussy.
8/4/09 1:12 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
sly fox
18 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 6/30/09
Posts: 7
not paralyzed, but Billy Wicks, the catch wrestler, broke his neck bridging and doesnt advocate it as a method of strengthening the neck i believe


KyokushinCatch - ^okay, and i'm not trying to be a dikk, but could you post some documentation of a wrestler being paralyzed due strictly to neck bridges? seriously, i'd like to know as i'm a coach. thanks.
8/7/09 12:01 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
sly fox
18 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 6/30/09
Posts: 15
lol, really? now id love to know what exactly he was doing

KyokushinCatch - did hear about the Wicks one, but understand he was doing a lot more than just bridging - more like (from what I've heard) extreme neck gymastics

Reply Post

You must log in to post a reply. Click here to login.