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Health & Medical UnderGround >> Ice or Heat for my lower back?

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5/13/09 3:52 PM
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TLM378
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Long story short... started back at BJJ a few months ago. I noticed stiffness in my lower back.

I recently moved to a different state and no longer have health insurance. I'd been going to a chiropractor for an unrelated upper back/neck problem (which he helped tremendously.) My lower back never really hurt, just felt a little stiff, but NOW it is hurting.

I think it's from practicing the shrimp movement in BJJ. I noticed last night it felt tense during the exercise.

Do I reach for a bag of ice or heat... or both to alleviate the pain?

Any other advice besides stopping the shrimp?
5/13/09 9:43 PM
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maui
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I use ice when my back bugs me
5/13/09 10:08 PM
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voorhees
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No insurance?I wouldnt even do cardio or lift weights w/o insurance much less do grappling or striking.

Jesus,good luck bud.
6/4/09 1:17 AM
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asscobra
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 Ice for swelling, heat for soarness. Shrimping isn't exactly a high impact drill, you sure that's what did it?
6/5/09 11:10 AM
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Haider Qayyum
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Fighting Farang (c), Blogger
You may also want to stretch a little bit, maybe get a massage. You'd be surprised at how much it helps. 
7/26/09 2:24 PM
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MuscleGeek
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Depends on what's the cause.. If it's just a sore muscle, heat will help loosen it up.. If you're using a gel, use a capsaicin gel. Not only does it heat the area up like Ben Gay, but it also depletes substance P which amplifies pain. It works so much better than any other gel on the market.

If the area is inflammed, use ice.
7/26/09 4:55 PM
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martinburke
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Try stretching the psoas muscle. When it gets tight, it rotates your pelvis anteriorly.

http://www.pilatesdigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/iliopsoas-muscle.jpg


Google Video has a bunch of psoas stretches.

Usually, when a client has psoas issues,he/she also has trigger points and tightness in Quadratus Lumborum(see that first link), so stretch that out ,too.

And the short head of biceps femoris(hamstrings) is also usually involved. This little shit stirrer has a direct fascial connection(via the middle section of adductor magnus) to the sacrum, so when it's got trigger points, you can expect lower back pain.

Sometimes just stretching quadratus lumborum and the hamstrings doesn't give you enough relief, and you'll have to get those trigger points worked on.
7/27/09 12:40 AM
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MMADC
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As a general rule, use ice for pain relief when the pain started (or was aggravated) within a few weeks. Use heat when the injury is chronic and has been hurting for longer than a few weeks. It's also a good to avoid applying heating pads to the spine or head, neck or face. Ice is better suited for these areas until and unless a physician tells you otherwise.
7/29/09 2:48 PM
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Ideologic
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Alright, I wanna dive into this a little deeper.

I have been suffering from chronic inflammation of the SIJ for almost a year now. I have been training on-and-off but never really had an extended time off. When I have taken short time off, however, it seemed I got stiffer and more painful.

I ALWAYS take time to stretch my hips and low back (psoas, piriformis, hip flexors, quadratus, hamstrings, etc) at the end of training, but it seems like I am still not getting any better. I never stretch cold, and always make sure to stretch antagonistic muscles after stretching a large group.

I have a foam roller and do SMR almost every day. I have good days and bad days, lately more bad than good, but haven't been training as much which is odd.

I plan on taking August off of training completely, but am not sure how to proceed when I return to training. I don't have the $192 for a physical therapist consultation, and have no health insurance.

I have been on a regular NSAID regimen for about two-three weeks now, and it doesn't seem to be helping. I also take fish oil supplements and avoid eating any excessively fatty foods to reduce inflammation in general.

Any advice?

Thanks in advance, I know complex health situations are ridiculous to talk about over the internet, but I am trying to do this on my own as much as possible.
7/30/09 3:10 PM
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martinburke
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I've had surprisingly good results using the techniques from a book called "Spinal Manipulation Made Simple". It's by a guy who developed back problems himself, and his long search for treatments that actually worked.

The techniques are really gentle, so gentle that I had doubts as to whether they'd work. But I knew that at least they wouldn't cause more harm. To my surprise, they've worked far better than I'd hoped.

http://www.amazon.com/Spinal-Manipulation-Made-Simple-Techniques/dp/1556433522/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1248980232&sr=1-1

The book is easy to read, but the assessment procedures and techniques should have been layed out in a more concise manner. The author uses a conversational writing style, so I had to make my own notes so that I could get the pertinent info into a form I could memorize.

But other than that, I have no complaints about the book, and clients have had no reports of pain following sessions.
7/30/09 3:47 PM
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martinburke
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See if this link works:


http://books.google.com/books?id=wCHmsvtfpzsC&dq=Jeffrey+Maitland&printsec=frontcover&source=bl&ots=LczVXqnvqe&sig=HAMQ1PDz3cN5YCMUYqxJtACuq6k&hl=en&ei=yw03St-FBZP2MMPCxIQN&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6#PPA8,M1
7/30/09 7:36 PM
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Ideologic
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That Google link worked, thanks.

Martin, I am assuming here that you were responding to my post, and not the original post. Is that correct? If So:

Just from browsing the limited sections of book, it seems as though I will need a skilled partner to apply the techniques for me. Though I can't see the section on the Sacrum (argh!), I am just assuming. I have no problem trying to find someone to train in these techniques and apply them for me, but clearly this is not the wisest path. But, given my constraints of having no money and no insurance, is that what you are recommending?

(insomuch as you could recommend medical advice without the fear of legal recourse. I can assure you, I will not sue.)
7/30/09 11:38 PM
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martinburke
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Yes, I was referring to you.

First, take any advice you read on a MMA forum with a grain of salt and a truck load of caution.

I'm assuming you've been diagnosed by a professional as having SIJ, and you're not just self-assessing. Otherwise, proceed at your own risk. Self-diagnosis is tough even for people who know how to systematically eliminate possible causes. Up to 20% of medical diagnoses are incorrect, and that's trained professionals...


It could be something else entirely than SIJ Dysfunction, such as:

Hip joint pathology, lumbar radiculopathy, iliotibial band friction syndrome, trochanteric bursitis, lumbar facet joint dysfuntion, peripheral sciatic nerve entrapment, superior or inferior gluteal nerve entrapment, or arthritic changes in the SI joint.


To test for SIJ dysfuntion, (prepare to get your Google on):

• Gapping(distraction)test

• thigh thrust test

• hip compression test - similar to the gapping test, but you're squeezing the ASISs together rather than prying them apart

• Gaenslen's test

• FABER Patrick test

Now some of those videos are in German, but they're pretty self-explanatory.




About the techniques in the book:

The techniques are really simple, and the book actually goes into what to feel for. Check out pages 5, 10, 19 and 39. You're not forcing anything, only encouraging things to unwind.

So if you know someone with a little common sense that you trust, you should be okay. The book's only @ $14, so sell some blood or something. :)
7/31/09 8:04 PM
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Ideologic
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Thanks a lot!

I had already been googling around for SIJ dysfunction tests. I was diagnosed by a professional, though she wasn't my regular doc as I don't have one. She did about 6 tests, one of them being the FABER. Before that I had tried the FABER on myself with a friend, but it didn't result in any kind of pain. I think most of her tests were checking for disc herniation, though.

Thanks for the links, found the German videos already. Good Stuff. I will find a way to grab that book, poke around with these tests, and let you know what I find.

Thanks for your time!

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