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Jen >> The Jungle Effect


7/6/09 6:07 PM
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Bolo
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Edited: 07/06/09 6:07 PM
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For those who read and enjoyed "The Omnivore's Dilemma" and "In The Defense of Food", I highly recommend another book called "The Jungle Effect".

A brief idea in regards to what the book is about:

"Family physician Miller had seen countless cases of chronic illness and weight gain, but it wasn't until she saw a patient recently returned from Brazil that a light bulb went off in her head: the patient had noticed marked improvement after just a few weeks in her father's native village. Intrigued, Miller did some research and found a number of "cold spots" around the world, areas where chronic diseases like diabetes, depression and heart disease are disproportionately low. She then embarked on a world tour to find out why....."

You can also hear a 50 min. presentation about her book she did at Google:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCnlHXGAJVE

What is interesting about the fact that the author is a doctor was that she said that she had to throw out everything she learned about nutrition in school, the book discusses how genetics was not a factor in getting or not getting these various diseases, and how she had patients try these various diets and saw real world results.

As some of you know, I am primarily on a raw food diet. Over time, my diet has changed to about 90% raw and 10% cook. The main reason why I went from 100% raw to about 90% was that I didn't want my kids to rebel from our raw food diet when they got older, so I felt that giving them about 2 meals a week of cooked food would allow them to feel like they weren't missing out on something. I used to take my kids out to restaurants, but the more I began to understand what was in commercial industrial food, the more uneasy I began to feel about eating out. I felt much better with making things at home where I could control everything. So when we eat cooked food, we follow the guidelines and some of the recipes that were found in this book. I definitely feel a difference between eating the "traditional way" versus the "modern way" when it comes to cooked food.

I highly recommend this book for most people. I tell my family and friends that my raw food diet is too extreme for most people to accept, however, the recipes in The Jungle Effect are practical enough for everyone. Many people associate healthy eating with suffering and eating food that doesn't taste good, but this is not that. When I have had several people try the recipes from the book, they are very surprised that they eating healthy food.
7/6/09 8:40 PM
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Hunter V
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might go to amazon and pick up a copy!
7/7/09 12:36 AM
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Hunter V
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and its ordered!
7/7/09 2:15 PM
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cincibill
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If a person wants to learn more about raw food diets, do you recommend all three? What sources of info do you use?
7/7/09 2:32 PM
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Edited: 07/07/09 6:05 PM
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Those books aren't about raw food diets specifically, however, I recommend all of them just as a general understanding of food in general. The information in those books is very eye opening when comes to understanding where your food comes from, what is in them, the historical/cultural context from which they came, how our modern way has deviated so much from traditional ways, the flaws in modern nutritional "science", how genes are a minimal factor in modern diseases, how politics and money effects your food, etc... I think it is good to get background info and principles before looking into specifics.

As far as raw food diets, most of the info out there are vegan. I found it very difficult to find info on raw food diets than contained animal food. I based my raw food diet on the Wai Diet and Primal Diet. You can do a search on the internet and find info on those diets.

One thing I have found when it comes to diets. including the raw food diets that I based my diet on, is that you find a lot of contradictory information. Some diet will advocate X, while other diets will say never to do X. To find the best situation for yourself, you're going to have to tweak things here and there. How I eat is slightly different from my wife which is slightly different from my kids. My best advice is to pay attention to your body. Your body will tell you what it feels is good or not. In my opinion, our society has brainwashed people to ignore negative signs and made people think that something abnormal is actually normal, so sometimes some people don't realize that the body is giving a sign when it doesn't agree with something.
7/7/09 10:15 PM
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cincibill
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Thanks, looking forward to reading this material.
7/7/09 11:54 PM
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Eel
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Just watched "The Jungle Effect"
lecture. She touched upon a
subject that I have been interested
in for some time--the synergy of
ingredients. Her teachings seem
to suggest that native cultures
naturally arrived at the
optimal combinations of ingredients
that were available to them. That raises
an interesting question as to why
those ingredients would all appear
together...
7/8/09 3:42 AM
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Bolo
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I remember seeing a show in which the host was on a tropical island and a native there was teaching him a bit about survival. The native guy warned the host about a being careful to not step on a particular poisonous fish that was in the water. But the native guy then said how the antidote for the poison from the fish could be found in a plant that was not too far away along the beach. The native guy said that nature always had a way of establishing "balance". I thought that comment was very interesting.
7/8/09 9:25 AM
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Eel
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I was glad the author talked
about the Tarahumara indians
and their diet. I recently read
"Born to Run" and the
Tarahumara indians were heavily
featured in that book. The book
did explore their diet but not
to any great extent. It seemed
to indicate that they consumed
large amounts of tortilla and
beans. They also talked about
a magical elixir that the
indians drank that cured almost
all their woes. It is interesting to
note that the author of "Born to
Run" left out the part about
the heavy consumption of herbs.
The very thing that may make
it possible for them to consume
a diet almost entirely of plants
and grains with no ill-effects.
I am also dubious about the
indians ability to walk and run
barefoot or in their tire scrap
sandals. My guess is that their
is a significant conditioning
period involved. The point
being that the author later
features runners who extrapolate
techniques from the Tarahumara indians
without having a view of the full
picture.
7/9/09 2:44 PM
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Bolo
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Edited: 07/09/09 2:44 PM
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As far as the ability to walk barefoot, a friend of mine said that when he was in college, there was a guy there from Africa. He said that this guy had extremely thick callous on the bottom of his feet. I'm not sure if he was exaggerating, but he said that the guy had a thick layer of callous skin that was like an inch thick.

Even though "In Defense of Food" and "The Jungle Effect" is mainly about food, the thing I like is that is that they talk about how the health of these type of people cannot be isolated to one thing. It's the cultural, movement, food, lifestyle, etc.... all together that produces the effect.

This weekend, my wife's uncle was talking about the benefits of some particular herb and how it helps decrease high blood pressure. My wife's mother immediately said that she was interested in taking that herb. I didn't saying anything, but I was laughing inside because she is fat as hell, eats like crap, eats as much as 2 grown men, does not do a single bit of exercise, and thinks that some herb is going to help lower her blood pressure.
7/15/09 10:19 PM
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nogidavid
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downloading this book now

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