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HolyGround >> does G-D have a wife?


12/29/09 11:09 AM
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770mdm
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From the papter "Souls of Fire" by Ethan Dor-Shav:
What is the semantic issue at hand? Contrary to the Christological tradition (dominating biblical lexicography through the nineteenh century and beyond), the Hebrew canon does not uphold the dualist body-soul doctrine, submitting instead three soul terms: Nefesh, ruah, and neshama. In general, Western thinkers struggled to fit the three Hebrew souls into the later single-soul dogma. In the Gospels, the human core is called psuche (“soul”) while pneuma (“spirit”) is primarily reserved for God’s emanation (as in “the Holy Spirit”).The Greek translations and their English off­ shoots attempted to equate nefesh with “soul” and ruah with “spirit.” Ne­shama, having no Greek counterpart, was translated as “breath.”
 
But even a superficial reading of the Bible inevitably reveals that these easy correlations falter, and the inevitable result was a diffusion of the He­brew terms. In the King James Version (KJV), for example, ruah is variously translated as “wind,” “spirit,” and “breath,” but also occasionally as “mind,” “anger,” “courage,” etc. Nefesh, though predominantly rendered as “soul,” is also translated as “breath,” “self,” “mind,” “heart,” “will,” “desire,” and “appetite.” Even the infrequent neshama is variously rendered as “breath,” “spirit,” and “soul.” From the opposite perspective, when encountering the word “soul” in the KJV, the reader has no way of knowing if it refers to nefesh, neshama, or nidvati; “spirit” can be a translation of ruah, neshama, or ov; and behind “breath” can lie any one of the three soul terms. In this mélange, the original, precise biblical meanings are all but lost.
 
Body—Earth
Nefesh—Water
Ruah—Wind
Neshama—Fire
 
Not to be mistaken for material building blocks, as in the Aristotelian model,in the Bible each element represents a realm of being. Man, and only man, exists simultaneously in all four realms. For man, therefore, each elemental soul represents a different way of existing as an “I.” In understand­ing the three soul-terms distinctively, it becomes apparent that instead of an “immature” text, the Hebrew Bible proves to be philosophically acute, comprehensive, and revolutionary.
 
The third level of what makes us human is ruah—literally Wind, which emanates from an intermediary realm between Heaven and Earth. Like nefesh, ruah is not unique to humans. In Psalm 104, the statement “You take away their ruah, they die” refers to “living things both small and great.”Ecclesiastes declares: “They have all one ruah; so that man has no pre-eminence above the beast.”74 In the story of the flood, the animals enter the ark “two by two, of all flesh in which is a ruah.”Ruah is, however, restricted to animals that breathe with lungs—the only ones endangered by the flood.  Fish and bugs have no share in ruah, but in varying degrees reptiles, birds, and mammals do. If our bones make us relatives to every growing tree, and our nefesh makes us relatives to all animated life forms, ruah makes us closer relatives to higher animals, from iguanas (however borderline), to dolphins, to chimpanzees.
 
12/29/09 11:11 AM
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770mdm
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What separates breathing and non-breathing animals on such a funda­mental level? The answer lies in the notion of “social self.” Ruah, translated as spirit, is a subject not for divinity school, but for a department of social sciences, for ruah accounts for all social relationships and inter-subjective dealings. Lower animals may live in societies, but lacking hierarchy they fail to acquire individual, social identities. Bees, for instance, assume their roles solely according to their age, while dogs gain their position in the pack through merit. As a rule of thumb, lower animals, even fish, cannot recog­nize individual counterparts, while reptiles,birds, and mammals can.?at the Bible appreciate sinter-subjective relations in higher animals—par­ticularly mother-child empathy—is evident from different decrees, includ­ing: “You shall not kill it and its young both in one day,”and “If a bird’s nest happens to be before you… you shall not take the mother with the young.”No comparable sensitivity pertains to fish.
 
It is no coincidence, then, that ruah makes its real debut in the Gar­den of Eden, where God appears “amidst the ruah of day.”Only here, as God declared, “it is not good that man shall be alone,”did Adam and Eve form the first social unit. And feeling themselves nude, they clothed themselves—the archetypical social convention. Similar examples regard­ing the social nature of ruah abound elsewhere: of marital bonds, “And the ruah of jealousy come upon him, and he be jealous of his wife”;of the breaking thereof, “the Lord has called you a forsaken woman, grieved in ruah, as a wife of youth when rejected”;of in-law tensions, in the case of Esau’s wives, “which were a grief of ruah unto Isaac and to Rebecca”;of political alliance, “Then God sent a negative ruah between Abimelech and the men of Shechem”;and finally, since nothing is more social by nature than treachery, the general rule: “Take heed to your ruah, that you do not betray.”With ruah, then, society was born, granting each individual a so­cial persona, on top of his or her organic and animal selves.
 
Together with social character, ruah is also responsible for dreams, par­tiality (likes and dislikes), play, and conscience. At its best, ruah strives for social greatness: power, leadership, and social justice. In Israelite thought, however, even the highest level of ruah, prophecy, serves a strictly social end. Isaiah makes the connection clear regarding the coming of the Messiah:
 
And the ruah of the Lord shall rest upon him, the ruah of wisdom and understanding, the ruah of counsel and might, the ruah of knowledge and the Fear of the Lord. And shall make him smell (va’hariho)with [employ­ing] Fear of the Lord: And he shall not judge after the sight of his eyes, neither reprove after the hearing of his ears. But with righteousness shall he judge the poor… and with the ruah of his lips he shall slay the wicked.
 
Having an individual social persona also permits self-awareness, itself a determining function of ruah, exemplified by Adam and Eve first blush­ing after eating from the Tree of Knowledge. As anyone who has practiced meditation knows, awareness and consciousness are connected to breath. Unlike metabolic (earth) and circulatory (water) systems, we can conscious­ly control respiration.  The easiest way to appreciate the apparatus of ruah is, appropriately, through its effect on the collective. Plus it can be felt sweeping over a sport stadium, soaring in music, or infecting a mob. In these situations, the power of ruah may run both ways—from a ruah-infused leader to the masses, or vice versa, from the accumulative spirit of the group to the leader. At the same time, in the Bible ruah never really becomes part of man; it is always called “the ruah of the Lord.” Here, for instance, is the description of Sam­son’s courage: “And the ruah of the Lord came mightily upon him and he tore the lion apart.”This added “spirit” was a momentary gift, aburst of bravery, a feeling that he could achieve anything.
 
12/29/09 11:11 AM
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770mdm
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In other instances, “spirit” proves to be a transferable, quantifiable com­modity, as in the case of Moses: “The Lord…took of the ruah that was upon him, and gave it unto the seventy elders,”or in the case of Elisha pleading of Elijah “Let a double portion of your ruah be upon me.”These examples indicate a wider conception of one’s ruah as passing on, in part, to people one has closely interacted with. A father and mother, in particular, give children not only of their body’s genes (as biological parents), but also of their spirit (as relational parents). This in turn explains the circling nature of the biblical Wind.
 
Similarly, we find in the story of Saul that an addition of ruah trans­forms one’s persona (when changed into charismatic king-material), “the ruah of the Lord will come upon you… and you shall be turned into an­other man,”as does its subsequent removal: “But the ruah of the Lord de­parted from Saul.”In ancient Israelite thought an individual is possessed by ruah, not vice versa. Like a social mantle, we assume the air of our ruah during life—rich or poor, husband or wife, meek or brave—but it does not incarnate our inner self.

 
12/29/09 11:15 AM
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770mdm
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Conclusion.  Ruah is in the feminin but when written in reference to G-d it's male.  Because it's not associated with physicality it's inherently from the spiritual realm.  Because it's from the spiritual realm it infuses physicality and thats why when it's associated with G-d it's male.

Sorry for the long posts but I thought it was an interesting read-

12/29/09 1:39 PM
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RoninBT
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No apology needed. It is an interesting topic; whether it goes anywhere or not it makes me wonder how many misconceptions we have accepted truth. Good stuff.
4/16/10 11:47 AM
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770mdm
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Edited: 04/16/10 11:51 AM
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Hosea 2: 16-22
Therefore, behold, I will allure her, and bring her into the wilderness, and speak tenderly unto her. 
And I will give her vinyards from thence, and the vally of Achor for a door of hope; and she shall respond there, as in the days of her youth, and as in the day when she came out of Egypt. 
And it shall be at that day, saith the LORD, that thou shalt call Me Ishi, and shall call Me no more Baali.
For I will take away the names  of the Baalim out of her mouth, and they shall no more be mentioned by their name.
And in that day will I make a covenant for them with the beasts of the field, and with the fowls of heaven, and with the creeping things of the ground; and I will break the bow and the sword and tha battle out of the land, and will make them to lie down safely.
And I will betroth thee unto Me for ever; yea, I will betroth thee unto Me in righteousness, and in justice, and in lovingkindness, and in compassion. 
And I will betroth thee unto Me in faithfulness; and thou shalt know the Lord.

Baali & Baalim means Husband here but in the ownership sense. 

"Ishi" here reminds us of Gen 2: 23
And the man said "This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh; she shall be called woman (Mebesari, Esari is the derivative of Esha), because she was taken out of man (MaEsh). 

The implication of Baal (an owner type husband) being replaced with a more endearing idea of husband through covenant For Ever.  G-d is married to us out of love not ownership or fear or what not.  Baal is also another type of idol worship found in the Torah.  

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