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S&C UnderGround >> Better Running Guage - Time/HR (For Improvement?)


11/9/09 3:33 PM
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LakerGirl
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What is a better way to gauge your running to see improvement? Shooting for specific times ofr simply following your HR?

The reason I ask is because my older brother recently started running again (probably 4 months ago) and he is already running 4 miles @ rougly 7-7:15/mile. I struggle at 14:30/2 miles.

Anyhow, I asked him how he had such good progress and he said he simply used a HR monitor and stuck to a cardio zone and had great/rapid results.

Anybody else have luck with this type of training?
11/9/09 3:42 PM
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gatotwopointoh
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Any serious endurance athlete uses HR for training, so yes (cycling they tend to also measure power output).

Lots of people make the mistake of working out and way too hard and not recovering properly; HR monitors keep you honest in that regard.

Track workouts are also a good supplement for a serious runner, but that is a bit of a different issue as you are going at near maximum effort.
11/9/09 4:08 PM
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LittleJoeMama
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HR for sure. It takes the guess work out for me.
11/9/09 6:33 PM
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WidespreadPanic
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gatotwopointoh - Any serious endurance athlete uses HR for training, so yes (cycling they tend to also measure power output).

Lots of people make the mistake of working out and way too hard and not recovering properly; HR monitors keep you honest in that regard.

Track workouts are also a good supplement for a serious runner, but that is a bit of a different issue as you are going at near maximum effort.

This is true - there's a "no man's land" in terms of intensity that is a bit too hard to enable good recovery and not hard enough to enable improvement in VO2max.

One of the better methods is to run a hilly course. You have to push into the near red zone continually then you get some respite on the downhills. It's a built-in Fartlek style workout.

IMO you need two types of base training. Long steady distance and intermediate burst training. On top of those, there's 'race pace'. I think it's a great idea to find 10K races and run in as many of those as you can, even one every two weeks if your kinesiology allows it. (i.e. you aren't prone to shin splints and similar musculo-skeletal problems).


11/16/09 6:25 PM
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bigjohnstud
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Edited: 11/16/09 6:26 PM
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I use a HR monitor and love it. Just keep the heart rate in the proper zone and put in the miles. And, if you run in the aerobic zone (most of my runs) it is actually a very comfortable pace, yet over time you get great results. I ran a 5k with no training at a terrible time of of 33:40 and felt like death. I decided to actually train for the next one and after 8 weeks with the HR monitor I ran 26:30. And most of the training runs were not that hard. Also, do a search for the McMillan Running Calculator. Plug in your last race time and it gives you a whole page of info about what pace you should be training at. There is a ton of info there. Just read the articles about making your own training plan.
11/17/09 6:05 PM
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molsonman
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What are some good HR monitors?
11/17/09 6:23 PM
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gatotwopointoh
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Polar and Suunto are both rock solid. I don't have any experience with Sigma, Nike, Timex or New Balance's stuff.

The cheaper Polar HR monitors ($70-$110) are just as good as the more expensive ones, you just get more features that you don't need. You used to need to send Polar stuff back to the factory to have the battery replaced which is kind of a bitch; don't know if this still applies.

With HR training, what you really want to know are your HR zones. That's pretty much it. All HR monitors do this, so you can be under $100 no problem.
11/20/09 7:23 AM
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Leigh
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HR monitor. I recently increased my pace and wouldn't have done so without a HR monitor. I ran at my usual pace but noticed my heart rate was lower. So I picked it up and was surprised to find I could maintain it
11/20/09 12:21 PM
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Daredevil73
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 If you're in to any sort of endurance training and use a HR monitor, consider the book "SERIOUS Training for Endurance Athletes."  They have programs for every endurance sport you can think of, and it's all HR based.
11/20/09 1:09 PM
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GaryG
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Leigh - HR monitor. I recently increased my pace and wouldn't have done so without a HR monitor. I ran at my usual pace but noticed my heart rate was lower. So I picked it up and was surprised to find I could maintain it


Similiar experience for me too. Before the HR monitor I'd start out too fast, it hurt like hell and I'd never pick up the pace once I got in my jogging "comfort zone". With the HR monitor I started out slower, but as time went on during the run I'd increase the pace when my HR dropped below a certain point.

My perceived effort decreased, and my speed increased. They aren't mandatory but they sure do help alot.
11/21/09 3:35 AM
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Leigh
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Yep, I see training cardio without a HR monitor the same as lifting weights without the numbers on the plates. You CAN get strong, as people have, but it takes out the guess work. You feel like you are lifting more than last week - but are you?

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