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BookGround >> Anyone read the "Dragonlance" novels?


12/7/09 8:14 PM
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gregbrady
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GaymidaGaydan - I really like all the DARK SUN books.


Cool universe.


I've been meaning to check it out. It's Dungeons and Dragons based right?
12/7/09 9:27 PM
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mikecard
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Nitecrawler - 
Steve72 - 
Nitecrawler -  I was then told that there was a shitty animated movie that came out a few years ago



Never fucking happened, and I will kill anyone who says otherwise.


Holy shit this looks fucking terrible....WTF is with the mix of CGI & anime?



This makes baby jeebus cry :(

the books are fucking awesome...i almost slit my wrists during this movie
12/7/09 9:32 PM
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mikecard
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Nitecrawler - As I said on the thread in the geekground, when LOTR hit it big in theatres I thoguht it was only a matter of time till a good DL movie came out. I was then told that there was a shitty animated movie that came out a few years ago which fucking hurts my soul LOL.

Anyway, I wonder if they will ever get around to making a DL movie.

In any case, how could you not love Tass? The dude was a little badass...albeit a fucking cleptomaniac.


this is one of my goals in life, to bring this to the big screen - properly.
12/7/09 10:48 PM
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DreamerMMA
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gregbrady - 
GaymidaGaydan - I really like all the DARK SUN books.


Cool universe.


I've been meaning to check it out. It's Dungeons and Dragons based right?
I'm pretty sure it is.

I think it's the AD&D world that's basically a magical wasteland after years of wizard wars left everything fucked up.

Cannibal halflings, bald dwarves, mutants, all kinds of crazyness.
 
12/7/09 11:36 PM
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Wally Saves
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I started reading them in the eraly 90s. Then a girl let me touch her vagina and I stopped reading them.
12/8/09 12:17 AM
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GaymidaGaydan
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Wally Saves - I started reading them in the eraly 90s. Then a girl let me touch her vagina and I stopped reading them.



That never happened.
12/8/09 11:52 AM
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gregbrady
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DreamerMMA - 
gregbrady - 
GaymidaGaydan - I really like all the DARK SUN books.


Cool universe.


I've been meaning to check it out. It's Dungeons and Dragons based right?
I'm pretty sure it is.

I think it's the AD&D world that's basically a magical wasteland after years of wizard wars left everything fucked up.

Cannibal halflings, bald dwarves, mutants, all kinds of crazyness.
 


Damn that sounds pretty cool. Wikipedia here I come.
12/8/09 1:25 PM
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Fightin_Chance
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gregbrady - 
DreamerMMA - 
gregbrady - 
GaymidaGaydan - I really like all the DARK SUN books.


Cool universe.


I've been meaning to check it out. It's Dungeons and Dragons based right?
I'm pretty sure it is.

I think it's the AD&D world that's basically a magical wasteland after years of wizard wars left everything fucked up.

Cannibal halflings, bald dwarves, mutants, all kinds of crazyness.
 


Damn that sounds pretty cool. Wikipedia here I come.

 Muls if i remember correctly.......half dwarves bred for fighting in gladiatorial combat

pronounced mules....badass
12/8/09 1:30 PM
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Obama's Boytoy
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gregbrady - 
Stronghold - Aren't there like 200 DL novels? Which ones are the 'good, must read' ones?


Anything by Weis and Hickman. The rest are hit or miss and some are unreadable. Must read are "Chronicles" trilogy without a doubt. If that doesn't get you hooked they're not for you.
I think Legends was good as well.
 
12/8/09 4:06 PM
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j-money
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I've been meaning to check out the Dark Sun novels for years as well. Where should I start with this series?
12/8/09 4:44 PM
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GaymidaGaydan
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j-money - I've been meaning to check out the Dark Sun novels for years as well. Where should I start with this series?



In this order IMO:

* Prism Pentad - Troy Denning
1. The Verdant Passage (October 1991), (ISBN 1-56076-121-0)
2. The Crimson Legion (April 1992), (ISBN 1-56076-260-8)
3. The Amber Enchantress (October 1992), (ISBN 1-56076-236-5)
4. The Obsidian Oracle (June 1993), (ISBN 1-56076-603-4)
5. The Cerulean Storm (September 1993), (ISBN 1-56076-642-5)

* Tribe of One - Simon Hawke
1. The Outcast (November 1993), (ISBN 1-56076-676-X)
2. The Seeker (April 1994), (ISBN 1-56076-701-4)
3. The Nomad (October 1994), (ISBN 1-56076-702-2)

* Chronicles of Athas - Various Authors
1. The Brazen Gambit (July 1994), by Lynn Abbey (ISBN 1-56076-872-X)
2. The Darkness Before the Dawn (February 1995), by Ryan Hughes (ISBN 0-7869-0104-7)
3. The Broken Blade (May 1995), by Simon Hawke (ISBN 0-7869-0137-3)
4. Cinnabar Shadows (July 1995), by Lynn Abbey (ISBN 0-7869-0181-0)
5. The Rise & Fall of a Dragon King (April 1996), by Lynn Abbey (ISBN 0-7869-0476-3)
12/8/09 4:54 PM
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GaymidaGaydan
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Fightin_Chance - 
gregbrady - 
DreamerMMA - 
gregbrady - 
GaymidaGaydan - I really like all the DARK SUN books.


Cool universe.


I've been meaning to check it out. It's Dungeons and Dragons based right?
I'm pretty sure it is.

I think it's the AD&D world that's basically a magical wasteland after years of wizard wars left everything fucked up.

Cannibal halflings, bald dwarves, mutants, all kinds of crazyness.
 


Damn that sounds pretty cool. Wikipedia here I come.

 Muls if i remember correctly.......half dwarves bred for fighting in gladiatorial combat

pronounced mules....badass



Its been a while but....

Basically its set in the desert and the way magic works is that wizards "suck" the life out of the plants (sometimes animals and people) around them.

There are defialers and preservers or something and the preservers use less power so the life can survive, where defilers suck the earth dry of all life and make it so nothing can grow there.

Then over time high powered wizards can slowely become dragons (or some sort of nice dragon for preservers)


Metal is super scarce and most weapons are made of obsidian or bone.

Dwarves have NO hair. Elves are usually sneeky and unethical, halflings live in the jungle and are cannibals.

Gnomes, trolls, goblins, and such are all extinct due to massive genocidal wars where human champions destroyed their populations.

The remaining human champions are now the kings and queens of the various city states, they all have cool names like "Sascha gnome blight" "Gallard: Bane of Gnomes".

The whole thing is kind of a post apocalyptic fantasy world.


Also Broms cover artwork was awesome.
12/8/09 8:48 PM
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Slapnutz
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any torrents of these dark sun novels ????
12/8/09 8:55 PM
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buddyang
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So is a trilogy happening or not?
12/9/09 7:27 PM
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j-money
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GaymidaGaydan - 
j-money - I've been meaning to check out the Dark Sun novels for years as well. Where should I start with this series?



In this order IMO:

* Prism Pentad - Troy Denning
1. The Verdant Passage (October 1991), (ISBN 1-56076-121-0)
2. The Crimson Legion (April 1992), (ISBN 1-56076-260-8)
3. The Amber Enchantress (October 1992), (ISBN 1-56076-236-5)
4. The Obsidian Oracle (June 1993), (ISBN 1-56076-603-4)
5. The Cerulean Storm (September 1993), (ISBN 1-56076-642-5)

* Tribe of One - Simon Hawke
1. The Outcast (November 1993), (ISBN 1-56076-676-X)
2. The Seeker (April 1994), (ISBN 1-56076-701-4)
3. The Nomad (October 1994), (ISBN 1-56076-702-2)

* Chronicles of Athas - Various Authors
1. The Brazen Gambit (July 1994), by Lynn Abbey (ISBN 1-56076-872-X)
2. The Darkness Before the Dawn (February 1995), by Ryan Hughes (ISBN 0-7869-0104-7)
3. The Broken Blade (May 1995), by Simon Hawke (ISBN 0-7869-0137-3)
4. Cinnabar Shadows (July 1995), by Lynn Abbey (ISBN 0-7869-0181-0)
5. The Rise & Fall of a Dragon King (April 1996), by Lynn Abbey (ISBN 0-7869-0476-3)


Thanks, man. Have you read all these books? Which were your favorites? I haven't read any Dragonlance/Forgotten Realms series in years.
12/9/09 7:33 PM
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Mr B
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this is one of my goals in life, to bring this to the big screen - properly.



you and me both, homie
12/9/09 7:35 PM
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Mr B
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Meohfumado - 
Doomsday - Margaret Weis and Tracy Hicks, I think...
Greatest set of books ever! The whole universe was great!

Though I like the Belgariad a lot.


Weis and Hickman also did Death Gate cycle, which was also very cool.

Don't fuck with Haplo or his dog...he was one surly Patryn.


i forgot about the death gate books!

those were fuckin' cool, too.
12/9/09 7:49 PM
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Mr B
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damn..went back and read the last couple of pages. didn't know they'd ever come out with an animated movie.

found some of the clips on youtube....jesus lord, what a pile of shit that was
8/20/10 8:18 PM
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The Rugged Ideal
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"I totally didn't cry when Sturm died."

You shut your mouth!
8/24/10 3:49 PM
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MuaySteve
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Mr B - damn..went back and read the last couple of pages. didn't know they'd ever come out with an animated movie.

found some of the clips on youtube....jesus lord, what a pile of shit that was


I had just finished re-reading the original trilogy before that movie came out. I was really looking forward to it... i couldn't get past the trailer.. Just Horrid Horrid shit.
9/4/10 11:09 AM
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Slapnutz
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People give the Shannarra series a load of shit saying that they are just complete fucking ripoffs of the lord of the rings, but I haven't read them....is this true ?

I personally think that the Dragonlance chronicles had a shitload of ripoff parts from the lord of the rings.

Here's some examples:

Elven princess falls for outsider and her family disapproves. In the lord of the rings it was arwen falling for aragorn....in Dragonlance it was Laurana falling for Tanis

None of the races get along and they are each seperated and don't want to work with each other. the humans dislike the elves who hate the dwarves and the dwarves have isolated themselves away and finally after a great evil starts conquering them seperately ( the orcs and sauroman in LOTR, draconians and Tahkisis in Dragonlance) they come together to fight as a team and defeat the bad guys.

Each had a dwarven fighter who was grumpy but was an exellent combatant with an axe.....Gimly meet Flint, Flint meet Gimli

each had a wizard who disappeared halfway through the tale and returned later and when they returned they were much much more powerful than when they were last seen. Raistlin and Gandolf

each had a smaller race character who was funny at times and provided a rogue type character....hobbits and kender.

of course there are alot of differences too, but they are very similar.
9/4/10 11:13 AM
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Slapnutz
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heres an interesting WIKI article on the similarities between Shannarra and LOTR:

Sword and The Lord of the Rings
The Sword of Shannara has drawn extensive criticism from critics who believe that Brooks derived too much of his novel from Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. In 1978, the influential fantasy editor Lin Carter denounced The Sword of Shannara as "the single most cold-blooded, complete rip-off of another book that I have ever read".[27] Elaborating on his disapproval of the book, Carter wrote that "Terry Brooks wasn't trying to imitate Tolkien's prose, just steal his story line and complete cast of characters, and [Brooks] did it with such clumsiness and so heavy-handedly, that he virtually rubbed your nose in it."[27] Roger C. Schlobin was kinder in his assessment, though he still thought that The Sword of Shannara was a disappointment because of its similarities to The Lord of the Rings.[28] Brian Attebery accused The Sword of Shannara of being "undigested Tolkien"[29] which was "especially blatant in its point-for-point correspondence"[29] with The Lord of the Rings. In an educational article on writing, the author Orson Scott Card cited The Sword of Shannara as a cautionary example of overly-derivative writing, finding the work "artistically displeasing" for this reason.[30]

Assessing The Sword of Shannara three decades after its publication, the Tolkien scholar Tom Shippey agreed with Attebery, as Shippey found that the novel was distinctive for "the dogged way in which it follow[ed] Tolkien point for point".[31] Within Brooks' novel, Shippey located "analogues" for Tolkien characters such as Sauron (Brona), Gandalf (Allanon), the Hobbits (Shea and Flick), Aragorn (Menion), Boromir (Balinor), Gimli (Hendel), Legolas (Durin and Dayel), Gollum (Orl Fane), the Barrow-wight (Mist Wraith) and the Nazgûl (Skull Bearers), among others.[31] He also found plot similarities to events in The Lord of the Rings such as the Fellowship of the Ring's formation and adventures, the journeys to Rivendell (Culhaven) and Lothlórien (Storlock), Gandalf's fall in Moria and subsequent reappearance, and the Rohirrim's arrival at the Battle of the Pelennor Fields, among others.[31] Avoiding direct commentary on the book's quality, Shippey attributed the book's success to the post-Tolkienian advent of the fantasy genre: "What The Sword of Shannara seems to show is that many readers had developed the taste ... for heroic fantasy so strongly that if they could not get the real thing they would take any substitute, no matter how diluted."[31]

Terry Brooks has stated that Tolkien's works were a major influence in his writing,[32] though he has also said that Tolkien was not the only influence upon him: other influences included the many different books he had read over his life and Lester del Rey (his editor). Also, mythology and ancient civilizations that he had learned about in school gave him a wealth of knowledge from which he drew from. Many of these influences are reflected in Brooks' works.[3]

In a 2001 Interzone essay, the author Gene Wolfe defended Brooks' derivation of material from Tolkien: "Terry Brooks has often been disparaged for imitating Tolkien, particularly by those reviewers who find his books inferior to Tolkien's own. I can say only that I wish there were more imitators -- we need them -- and that all imitations of so great an original must necessarily be inferior."[33] In a commentary for The New York Times Book Review, the author of the science fiction novel Dune, Frank Herbert, also defended Brooks, saying:

Don't fault Brooks for entering the world of letters through the Tolkien door. Every writer owes a similar debt to those who have come before. Some will admit it. Tolkien's debt was equally obvious. The classical myth structure is deeply embedded in Western society.
" Every writer owes a similar debt to those who have come before. "


That's why you should not be surprised at finding these elements in The Sword of Shannara. Yes, you will find here the young prince in search of his grail; the secret (and not always benign) powers of nature; the magician; the wise old man; the witch mother; the malignant threat from a sorcerer; the holy talisman; the virgin queen; the fool (in the ancient tarot sense of the one who asks the disturbing questions) and all of the other Arthurian trappings.
What Brooks has done is to present a marvelous exposition of why the idea is not the story. Because of the popular assumption (which assumes mythic proportions of its own) that ideas form 99 percent of a story, writers are plagued by that foolish question, "Where do you get your ideas?" Brooks demonstrates that it doesn't matter where you get the idea; what matters is that you tell a rousing story.[34]
Saying that "Brooks revert[ed] to his own style ... somewhere around Chapter 20",[34] Herbert remarked upon what Brooks did not take from Tolkien:

In the last chapters, you get the Brooksian innovations--the Rock Troll [Keltset], who is deep and mute and whose actions, thus, are far more important than any words could be; the Grim Druid, who really changes character in the second half of the book, becoming far more complex and devious (the name Allanon should give you a clue); Balinor, the Prince of Callahorn, whose role breaks with myth tradition; the Warlock Lord, who pretty much fills the traditional role of evil--but that's what you expect of evil and it doesn't blight a good story.[34]
Herbert also praised the characters of evil in the book: "Ah, the monsters in this book. Brooks creates distillations of horror that hark back to childhood's shadows, when the most important thing about a fearful creature was that you didn't know its exact shape and intent. You only knew that it wanted you. The black-winged skull bearer, for instance, is more than a euphemism for death.[34] In a 2001 article for Seattle Weekly, David Massengill also commented upon Brooks' main characters, calling them "idiosyncratic adventurers."[11]

Other contemporary newspapers took separate sides on the Sword and Lord of the Rings issue. John Batchelor, writing for The Village Voice, thought it was the weakest of the 1977 surge in fantasy, ranking it below Stephen R. Donaldson's The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever, Seamus Cullen's Astra and Flondrix and The Silmarillion, edited by Christopher Tolkien, while commenting that it "unabashedly cop[ied]" Lord of the Rings. However, he also believed that it was serviceable, simply because there is something about sending a group off to face evil alone that is exciting.[35] Taking the opposite stance, L.V. Keptert in the Sydney Morning Herald believed that, while the book was similar enough to Tolkien that it would draw the many fans of that book to Sword, it was only so on a most basic level, and a valid comparison could not be made between the two.[36] The Pittsburgh Press took a similar stance, saying that Sword embodied the Tolkien's spirit and tradition but was quite able to stand apart from Lord of the Rings.[37]
9/5/10 4:01 PM
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gregbrady
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every fantasy novel owes it's existence to LOTR. It was the grandaddy
9/5/10 8:17 PM
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Slapnutz
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ttt
7/18/12 10:09 AM
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Nitecrawler
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TTT

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