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SBGI >> Fighters with a few predictable techniques


3/18/10 10:22 AM
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acid jazz
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Matt and others,

An instructor told me about a Muay Thai champion that only used 2 techniques in all of his fights, the jab and right kick. He might change the angle and the timing, but that is all he used and he won a lot of fights.

Obviously the guy knew more than just those 2 techniques, but supposedly that is all he used and practiced in sparring and on the heavy bag.

Could be an urban myth since a name was not given, but I have heard of somewhat similar stories in american kickboxing.

Anyway, any thoughts or opinions on a fighter that chooses to be incredibly good at a small amount of techniques? In a sense isn't one technique throughly mastered really more than one technique because you can use it so many different ways?
3/18/10 11:02 AM
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Luis Gutierrez
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The better the athlete and the higher the competition the more it will often appear to be the case with the champions but I don't think it that they just have a small or select amount of techniques alone but rather have a very subtle and complex game around those select techniques. This is where a sense of timing and distance, movement, set ups and transitions become what is most important and trained and what they have put in all their time into refining.

I personaly love to watch these type of athletes compete becuase though everyone knows what they will do, they can't be stopped and when their fights are discussed you can quickly see who is watching what. Some will be trying to analyze or disect possible weaknesses with technique options while the more experienced will be apprciating and studying their most subtle of set ups via small feints, footwork and angles.
3/18/10 12:51 PM
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acid jazz
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Luis Gutierrez - The better the athlete and the higher the competition the more it will often appear to be the case with the champions but I don't think it that they just have a small or select amount of techniques alone but rather have a very subtle and complex game around those select techniques. This is where a sense of timing and distance, movement, set ups and transitions become what is most important and trained and what they have put in all their time into refining.

I personaly love to watch these type of athletes compete becuase though everyone knows what they will do, they can't be stopped and when their fights are discussed you can quickly see who is watching what. Some will be trying to analyze or disect possible weaknesses with technique options while the more experienced will be apprciating and studying their most subtle of set ups via small feints, footwork and angles.
Luis,

Are you aware of anyone using a similar approach in grappling? I can't imagine that this approach could work anywhere other than in striking.
3/18/10 1:42 PM
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Luis Gutierrez
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Actually I was speaking mostly from a perspective of Judo, BJJ and Boxing because MMA still has so many bouts that are either mismatched in talent or style but as MMA continues to refine itself via better trained and prepared athletes (well rounded specifically for the sport and better paid) and hopefully the venues become even more skilled at match making, you will see some of the same.

Boxing, Judo and BJJ share a longer competitive history so the percentages are there for seeing the type of athletes you were refering to or about. This is why some of the most famous/ effective fighters and coaches in those sports always stress attribute refinement around the fundamentals inherent in thier approach or style and include movement and timing among those basics. The technical part is isolated usually with tons of drills to sustain and strengthen the foundations but the majority of refinement happens working alongside coaches in controlled sparring sessions where the living aspect of the sport can be worked on and further developed.
3/18/10 1:56 PM
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Luis Gutierrez
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I took this clip below from a discussion on the SBGi Member's Forum where we were discussing the depth behind what is seen as a "simple" game or approach.

It shows what often gets lost in both technique or attribute heavy training. Both extremes lose out the intelligence, art or science behind the combative sport imo. Look at certain fighters in their prime and they do what they do and can't be stopped even though they are often critiqued because of simple techniques or freakish attributes as if they had holes in their approach or were just the exceptions. Their is always more to it than that.(I think of Rickson back in the day and Fedor recently.)

So where you now have wrestling in pajamas and trading strikes facing off in keyoard debates against 101 counters and recounters meets which stand up style to best train, most capable and tested competitive stables in mma or bjj are doing what boxing and Judo have done for a while, focusing on training methods, coaches and trainers to best out of their specific athletes and doing this by really discovering what works best with the least effort and offers maximum output.

So as challenging as it is to make it look simple, it's that much more challengning to translate that to others since so much happens in the individual who can accomplish it and others are trying to either defeat via techniques or mimic movements when in actuallity they should be studying what is happening just before and after the techniques or movements.

Just my 2 cents but I think this clip does a much better job saying it:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81non05aKX4
3/18/10 3:28 PM
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Matt Thornton
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BJJ is a bit more complex in terms of volume, due to the amount of positions, frames, and postures involved. However, all good black belts still have their A games. Those A games are often very simple, a revolve around specific strategies designed to take the match into the positions, and places the athlete excels at. Think of Roger as an example, sweep, mount, cross choke. That is his A game, very simple. But I am quite sure he is competent everywhere else as well.

Mastering the fundamentals, and discovering your A game along the way, is the process of BJJ that everyone goes through over time.

www.straightblastgym.com
3/19/10 8:56 AM
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acid jazz
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Luis,

Thanks for explaining and posting the link with the vid about Charles Burley. I am ashamed to admit that I never heard of him to now.

The breakdown of what he was doing really emphasized the beauty of the art of boxing.
3/19/10 8:57 AM
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acid jazz
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Matt,

Thanks for explaining about the A game. It really makes sense and is clear after you broke it down.
3/25/10 10:51 AM
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zeerebel
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awesome post...
Intelligent Questions with Intelligent Answers. As a Judo/BJJ practitioner and has training in MT. Everything Matt and Luis brought up are right on the money.

That is why Combat base art at time very refine but at the same time very complex.

While the non combative tradition martial arts are very complex and not refine

What I mean by refine is that the art has been put throught the ringer and the coach/instructor/sensei etc realize that their is a time and place to train everything.

For example if I am getting my guys ready for a tournament I focus on the basic that fit their personilties, body type and current development in that art.

When we are not training for tournament/competition my guys learn a variety movement to expand their knowledge about the art

Z
Fusion Mixed Martial Arts
www.fusionmma.com

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