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Kickboxing UnderGround >> good gloves for a 5 year old.

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4/5/10 3:59 PM
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StephenL
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are these gloves too big for him?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqyBHFQN2rQ&feature=related
4/5/10 5:48 PM
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Khun Kao
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That is incredibly AWESOME! I can't tell you how much I *love* seeing little kids training Muay Thai!
4/11/10 8:03 AM
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StephenL
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KK.

do you have a kids muay thai program?

how to convince a parent that this program is better than enrolling them in a mcdojo with GIs and Katas?

stephen
4/11/10 8:48 AM
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Khun Kao
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Unfortunately I don't really. The only young kids who have participated in the progrfam are those whose parents also train.

However, I think the points you'd want to make are:

1. Discipline - Muay Thai is a great martial art that can be used to teach/encourage disciplined youngsters. Discipline in a class such as Muay Thai is even more important than your typical Karate/TKD dojo because a lot of the training will consist of "live fire" drills, so an undisciplined child will #1) not be allowed to participate in these drills with his/her peers, and #2) lack of discipline can lead to them injuring themselves.

2. Practicality - While this may be what *we* consider the selling point, because Muay Thai is a continuously 'tested' martial art, in all actuality this probably isn't the main selling point you'd want to use for a kids program. Most parents no jack and shit about martial arts when they want to enroll their kids and think that ALL martial arts are practical. Sure, bring it up but don't harp on it.

3. Physical Fitness - This is a very good one to stress.... Muay Thai has one of the greatest training/conditioning programs of all martial arts. Strength, endurance, toughness.... these are good things!

4. Self Confidence - This, I believe, should also be a big selling point. Kids who take their training seriously should experience a huge boost in their self esteem. However, this would be true of any martial art, not just Muay Thai. I would use this as a selling point, but not as something that sets it apart from other martial arts. However, the self confidence comes in conjunction with all that I've mentioned above. As the kids train, they have to be disciplined to succeed. If they are disciplined, they get into better shape and become better boxers. This in turn will toughen them up, not just physically but mentally, which has a lot to do with their confidence and self esteem.

5. Tradition - I'm really not sure how much of a selling point this is to parents and kids, but I get the impression that a lot of people look at Karate/TKD/Kung Fu classes where everyone lines up according to belt rank, bows, and does a bunch of training drills in sync with one another. They may look at this and think THAT is "discipline" and "tradition", and of course "practical". Its important to be able to make a concerned parent understand that while Muay Thai does not take that approach, it is no less structured, disciplined, and/or traditional than any other martial art.

6. Safety/Injuries - This is going to have to be a part of the discussion. Muay Thai *is* a contact sport, but is no more dangerous than any other sport their child may participate in. Care is taken to ensure that students are equipped with the proper safety gear and that it's being used correctly. For instance, I was recently reading about some studies done regarding the safety of amateur boxing for kids, and it was pretty favorable. Unfortunately I do not have the links.... Yes, parents are going to have to get used to the idea of lumps and bruises that are associated with the sport. The occasional knot on the shin, a fat lip here, a black eye there, maybe a bloody nose... Really? Is that any different than may happen in a Soccer program? or Basketball? Especially Football?
4/11/10 11:16 AM
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StephenL
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Thank you.

Regarding safety. When I see Tae Kwon Do kids reverse heel hook kicking another in the head, I wonder if the parents truly understand what that means.

Most disturbing vid of the kick.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BP-0Ngn6a5I

stephen
5/16/10 7:29 PM
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cuzz63
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Reminded me of my 6 yr old in his Karate Class. He comes to my gym and watches me train MMA every other day, where we train leg kicks, knees and elbows as well as takedowns and submissions. He goes to his Karate class where they go through the motions of knees and elbows and one day they decide to spar (his first time sparring). Right away he is throwing leg kicks and knees. We have to tell him they arent allowed so as soon as they begin again he shoots for the TD and tries to get a choke...wish I had the camera that day.
5/16/10 8:02 PM
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Khun Kao
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A buddy of mine has a niece who trains TKD. However, whenever he gets together with his family, he teaches her Muay Thai. I understand that every time after they've visited, she gets in trouble with her TKD class because she starts using MT on them and really lays a beatdown....

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