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Kickboxing UnderGround >> Ways to improve footwork?

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4/7/10 3:12 PM
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Posty Magee
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Prolly the most neglected part of my game. Any ideas or videos on the matter would be appreciated.
4/7/10 3:31 PM
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Khun Kao
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Practice.

Footwork was probably the most neglected part of my game as a fighter as well. My own footwork still sucks, but I've learned a lot of little techniques and strategies so that the fighters I coach don't suffer the same fate.

There are a bunch of different types of footwork. Step and slide, skipping, shuffling, cross-steps, angles, pivots....

Step & Slide is what is most common when you're boxing. Step with the lead foot, slide the rear foot in as you return to stance. You can also step with the rear first.

Skipping is often the footwork you use when executing lead legged kicks and knees, where you quickly switch foot position (NOT YOUR STANCE) to get a little bit more "oomph"....

Shuffling is what you do to drive a technique through more powerfully. For instance, as you're throwing a round kick you continue to shuffle in the same direction throughout the kick. You don't stop and plant the support leg, it takes an extra "shuffle".... This can also be employed in boxing where you "shuffle" both feet almost simultaneously when you're moving to strike. (there may be other terminology for this that you're used to)

Cross-steps aren't as commonly used, but worth the time to learn. Usually this means stepping with one foot across the other foot. For instance, I step my lead foot across my rear foot or vice versa. While I think its important to learn how to use cross-steps, most people will not use them very often.

Learning your angles obviously is exceedingly important in all of the above mentioned footwork methods. Learning to do all the above with the proper angles is what will turn you from a "meh" fighter into a rather competent one.

Now, the pivoting, to me at least, is one of the most critical elements to footwork that I ever learned. It is something I only WISH had been given greater emphasis as I trained. Essentially I've found it applied primarily to the first style of footwork I mentioned above, "step & slide"... You step at an angle, then pivot to adjust so that you are facing your target. Simple enough in concept, and something that you will realize you've been learning by a kind of "osmosis" throughout your training, but when you learn to start CONSCIOUSLY practicing and employing this footwork it really starts to open things up..... at least it did for me!
4/7/10 4:48 PM
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sevenone
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Shuttle runs!!!!
4/7/10 6:50 PM
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OctaviousBP
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I agree with KK except with regards to the cross-steps. I can't think of any situation where it's useful, and I know it can be harmful. It is virtually impossible to block/shield while cross-stepping, and this can be taken advantage of by proper timing from your opponent. Also, with one good, driving leg-kick your opponent can take out both your legs.

Doing drills like shuttle runs can help develop skills in isolation, but I prefer to incorporate drills into pad sessions with my fighters, to get the maximum benefit.

One drill that we do to help with angles and retreating footwork is:

(against orthodox)
I throw a straight right punch and the boxer steps to their left on a 45 degree angle (parry is optional) and drive a right knee. Then I throw a straight left, the boxer steps to their right at 45 and drives a left knee. The effect is that you end up in kind of a zig-zag retreat.

I find this drill quite helpful for angled evasions and counter knees.
4/7/10 7:32 PM
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Posty Magee
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Good shit so far guys. Thank you.
4/7/10 7:42 PM
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Khun Kao
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To be specific, for the MOST part I agree with OctaviousBP... The cross-step I describe is a more specialized manuever that you really don't want to make a habit of using because it can lead to bad things happening (as mentioned).

However, cross-stepping can open up your arsenal. I don't know if I can describe this accurately, but lets say that both you and your opponent are in the same stance. Orthodox for arguments sake....

Step with your lead foot (left foot) so that your toes are in line with your opponents left toes (toe-to-toe). With your right hand, cup his left elbow to hold it in place (do NOT direct it up/sideways/etc). Now pivot counter-clockwise on the left foot a full 180 degrees so that you and your opponent are standing shoulder-to-shoulder, facing the same direction.

Throw the left hook as he pivots to adjust to you.


Remember, cupping his left elbow is what allows you to get into position so he's not pivoting with you.

To be 100% honest with you, that is the ONLY cross-step technique that I would recommend experimenting with on a regular basis. I'm sure there are derivatives of that technique that are worth the time, but thats the only 1 I've learned personally.

The other applications to the cross-step technique that I know all relate to spinning techniques. We all understand how inherently risky these are, but how they can also be used to your advantage in the right situation.

Now.... why do I suggest practicing these techniques?

BECAUSE.... even though you may never use them yourself, practicing with them makes you RECOGNIZE them!!!!!!! Face it, we will always run across someone who is going to try this crap against us. The only way to prepare for it is to practice with it so you RECOGNIZE it when it happens!!!!!!
4/9/10 11:26 PM
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OneScoup
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Go on youtube and find some boxing drills.
4/10/10 10:33 AM
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sevenone
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Youtube's a double edge sword a lot of bad shit out there when it comes to Boxing technique.
4/10/10 8:49 PM
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Seul
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I'm learning to box, not muay thai, but I'm working hard on my footwork right now as well.

I do my shadowboxing like this:
1st round - throwing everything; single shots, combos, moving around, etc etc

2cd round - just foot work

3rd round - foot work with punches included, but doing everything really slow

4th round and on (if I do anymore than 3) - like the first round


I do at least three rounds of shadowboxing everyday (I know I should do more, but I get bored sometimes), and making two of them specific to footwork is doing wonders. I surprised how much even just this little bit every day is helping me.
4/13/10 11:25 AM
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Bull_in_chinashop
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sevenone - Youtube's a double edge sword a lot of bad shit out there when it comes to Boxing technique.

 
4/17/10 6:48 PM
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Tractor
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Kenny weldon tapes. He is good
4/20/10 12:23 AM
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sevenone
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Who do you think as a fighter either MT or K1 has the best footwork.
Again I suggest shuttle runs of varying types for anyone wanting to improve there footwork
4/21/10 12:08 AM
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OneScoup
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Tractor - Kenny weldon tapes. He is good


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