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Judo/Sambo UnderGround >> how to go about handling this judoka?


4/11/10 5:18 PM
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marabmirsan
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Member Since: 2/24/09
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frat frat frat

been in judo over a year and 1/2.
i know common guidelines of a gym on how to train with bigger and rougher opponents from doing jiu jitsu for a longer time

in my club a brown belt who outweighs me by about 90 lbs.( 280-290) and 6-7 inches taller 6'3"-6'5"

i am 175-180 lbs. 5'7" tall

he toss me every time, i can not sweep,reep, or sacrifice on him so i am pretty much his grappling dummy, in mat work he uses his bulk to roll on me and holds for the pin. he does this to every one, most just go through the motion and tap or get it over with and be tossed, i try to learn from him but seem like when i do he ups the ante on me

and for 1-2 days after, i am beat up with aches and soreness, stiff and can not go to class in the same week,
if i do not randori with this guy i can do judo 3-4 x's a week,


their are not any new guys in his weight class that stick around after going with him so that leaves us smaller guys to have a go with him. there is only 6-8 guys on the biggest class days mostly 4-6 is common for our class but i get to learn JUDO!

what would you say to sensei when you do not want to pair up in randori but will do kata, and speed drills just no live practice

1 i can not handle randori with you.
2 continue being a rag doll
3. say nothing and find another school( there are several nearby ) and feel like a traitor

or can anyone think of a better solution ? please help
4/11/10 5:37 PM
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khd29
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That's a huge difference in wieght (100 lbs) and I can relate. I have no idea how your class is set up but go a couple of rounds of randori to test yourself then switch partners. Do you notice yourself getting better against other opponents, at least?
4/11/10 6:10 PM
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judoblackbelt
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You can decline doing randori/mat work with him ,telling him his size is to much for you to handle. He will get the message and hopefeullly tone down his agressiveness. Usually us blackbelts kind of police the situation but when you have a student who is so much larger than the others(and no one of like size it doesn't work. We also know where the big fellas train and advise those like him to go there. Or we ask some of the big guys at other dojo's to come over and train with them. I'm 165 and when I train with the 180-200 I feel the difference. I won't roll with a guy that big. Odd as it may seem the sensei (including ours) says very little. Stop fighting him is the best short term advise. Also find a dojo where most of the guys are in the 160-180 lb range.
4/12/10 12:20 PM
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jaykoo
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1.5 years of judo (how many hours?) isnt that long to be practicing so playing a guy with 100 pounds + more experience isn't going to be easy at all. In fact, it might be impossible for the forseeable future.

All in all though, I find it kind of odd that your sensei hasn't said or done anything if this guy is running people out of your club and regularly hurting the current members, especially in such a small club. How hard do you play?


4/12/10 7:32 PM
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judo man
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Just stop doing randori with him. If he's trying to injure you and is not able to throw you cleanly. Some big dudes are so insecure that they try to prove themselves with smaller guys and only winding up injuring them. Besides, they only end up getting their butts kicked when they get to fight boys their size.

I'm not saying that heavyweights shouldn't work with lightweights just that they should work on things that will actually improve their game like ashiwaza techniques, improve timing rather than power their way thru them.
4/12/10 8:27 PM
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JoshuaResnick
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1. develop the good ole stiff lapel grip to the jaw to keep him off of you.
2. tell him to calm the fuck down or there will be problems.
3. tell the coach that if he cant control this guy that you will go to another club.
4/14/10 9:49 PM
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Chocolate Shatner
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I agree with Josh's #1. I've also developed the straight right hard "lapel grab" as a counter to big guys who want to charge in and try and bull rush you. Getting a heel of the hand in the chest really makes them think, and I can sometimes get a good grip, too ;-)
4/15/10 5:36 PM
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matt_chamberlain
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watch koga!
4/16/10 2:35 AM
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marabmirsan
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thanks for all your advice
we have visitors come and go, mostly there's only 5-6 guys in class, we all rotate with each other big or small,trouble is this judoka is just a giant and everthing he does is not easy to recover from with just a days rest. others just say nothing since they do not have to pair up with him.

I am positive he will give me an attitude like I am a puss after I tell him, and this might to stir up negative feelings against me because He also hangs out with the sensei.

yes he does get whipped by guys his size & experience when they pay a visit.

but I thought by now, that he would lighten up and be more open with teaching/helping out after putting a whoopin on me in randori for over a year but nope.

I am gonna feel like a traitor if i go accross town to another club, you know the JUDO communities are small & know everyone around.

This happened to me when i moved out of town and went to a different BJJ class not affliated with my former BJJ instructor. guys I knew would barley head nod me and move on when we came accross each other in competion meets.

I might as well be honest and see what happens worst is I will learn from a new class, but still learn JUDO.
4/16/10 9:17 AM
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judoblackbelt
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First and foremost you want to learn judo, have fun doing it, without getting hurt unnecessarily. The normal injuries/aches are enough by themselves. Working out with this bigger guy negates all those points. Judo is not like BJJ where changing schools is a big deal. We are encouraged to workout at other local clubs to help out and share our knowledge. It is more like a community thing. I have given you best the best advice I know from experience. Keep us posted how it goes.
4/16/10 6:47 PM
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JoshuaResnick
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screw feeling like a traitor. you do what is best for you. period.

and, you can always kick him in the balls. i've got that many times.
4/17/10 2:47 AM
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jaykoo
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I'm a little confused. why can some players at your small club not play with this guy:

"others just say nothing since they do not have to pair up with him."

while you feel you have to play him?

Also from earlier: "he does this to every one, most just go through the motion and tap or get it over with and be tossed,"

So everyone else puts up with him, gets beaten up as much as you do, and keeps on playing him and your sensei doesnt say anything?
4/17/10 8:27 PM
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Wet
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Edited: 04/17/10 8:27 PM
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You dont have to do anything you dont want to do. Its not disrespectful to your sensei to "tell him" (not ask him) that you only want to roll with people your size that arent going to bully moves. Remember, you're paying his salary and the customer is always right.

However, im over 300 pounds and have been asked by a smaller opponent to be more technical and not use my size to force moves that i know i wouldnt have pulled off against someone my own size. In the end it made our time against each other more productive. The big guy your going against knows he's bigger and his ego SHOULD be able to take criticism, otherwise he's just being a douche
4/19/10 7:02 PM
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marabmirsan
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To you big guys, Thank you for your insight as to what my big judoka might be thinking. I too have an ego that does not take well to constantly being tossed with no ability to overcome such a challenge which he presents to me, but hopelfully in time I can.

I plan too address my conerns this week.

as for how some match up and some do not with the bigger guy goes like this.

we have small in house tournaments from time to time and we get put into brackets according to weight regardless of belt, winner advances and so eventually the big Judoka is always winner in his weight class and takes on winners of other weight classes. No one of lower weight wins against him regardless of belt.

I should not say that all others do not try to do something or even that they give up easily, it is that he over powers us smallers guy with ease that it might look like we give up. I try all the time to do something and it could be seen also that I just give up as soon as he pins me, just cant over come his skill and weight advantage.

but another thing I want to bring up is that after I lose to a Black Belt or others in the class of more skill, they show me what to do like offense or defense.

He just waits out the remaing match time quietly after easily beating me and this adds to my frustration especially after I ask what I could be doing wrong or what I need to be doing right...,

not to much to ask after all I am still a beginner.

I get paired up with him probalby because I am the closest to weight and strength (I have swept him in mat work but still lose, cause he can just roll me no matter what and gets the pin)but to guys smaller I want to learn so I adjust myself to not let my size factor and I get tossed with them and learn from it.

I am going to be polite and state That I can not handle live training with him in the future and see how this goes.
Thans all you JUDO guys for the help.
4/20/10 12:08 PM
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jaykoo
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In-house tournaments, especially with such a small club, don't mean crap, especially when you play the same guy over and over again. So the same guy wins repeatedly - whatever, it's a learning experience. If he doesn't give you any pointers when you ask - stop asking him and ask the more experienced blackbelts (like your sensei) to critique you when you play him.

Like I said before, you might not be able to throw him for a while, maybe not ever - the difference in size and skill level is too big. You're a beginner and he isn't. But, that doesn't mean you cant learn from the experience. If he doesnt tone it down, dont play him, but if other guys can play him at the intensity level that is getting you banged up to where you can't play more than 1x/week, you should figure out if it's because of something he's doing or something you are [not]doing.



4/20/10 12:08 PM
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jaykoo
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In-house tournaments, especially with such a small club, don't mean crap, especially when you play the same guy over and over again. So the same guy wins repeatedly - whatever, it's a learning experience. If he doesn't give you any pointers when you ask - stop asking him and ask the more experienced blackbelts (like your sensei) to critique you when you play him.

Like I said before, you might not be able to throw him for a while, maybe not ever - the difference in size and skill level is too big. You're a beginner and he isn't. But, that doesn't mean you cant learn from the experience. If he doesnt tone it down, dont play him, but if other guys can play him at the intensity level that is getting you banged up to where you can't play more than 1x/week, you should figure out if it's because of something he's doing or something you are [not]doing.



6/30/10 12:19 AM
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leothelion
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 Big boys are tough to deal with...particularly if they have some skill....

I would advice, from my own experience, is get the big man moving....wear him out...whatever you do don't stand in front of him and try to out muscle him....bad move...tried that once in a tournament.    I got thrown, literally over the guys head, for an Ippon.   I am 230 lbs.   He weighed close to 350 lbs....
11/11/10 11:20 AM
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John Frankl
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Your instructor sucks.
11/11/10 4:56 PM
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Rock n Raleigh Suicide
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"I am positive he will give me an attitude like I am a puss after I tell him"


well you are....oh wait is this the OG?

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