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5/5/10 1:12 AM
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greco yeoman
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Edited: 05/05/10 1:14 AM
Member Since: 8/10/07
Posts: 3452
I only had one professor who asked us to cite case names on finals. It was pointless but no other professor I had cared, and most of them quietly frowned upon it. Kids who cite on the finals come off as insecure and usually substitute case names for substance. It's a total crapshoot though, depending on your professor.
5/5/10 1:20 AM
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greco yeoman
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Also, read this book: http://www.lawbooksforless.com/lawbooksforless/product_info_sample_no_split.php/products_id/91995
5/5/10 1:43 PM
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greco yeoman
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I can name on one hand the cases I cited on finals:

Pennoyer (cited in passing to show I went to the first week of class)
International Shoe (crucial)
Tunkel (public issue factors)
MAYBE Asahi? to show the Court's split on stream of commerce?

Are you looking at the tests posted by the specific professors you have next semester? If the tests are from random professors at your school, probably not such a meaningful indicator of what you'll get from your specific professors.
5/5/10 2:54 PM
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KenTheWalrus
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Member Since: 3/12/07
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 If you just want to pass you usually don't need to cite case names. If you're looking for the top ranking in the class, properly citing case names might give you an edge over #2.

I read all of the E&E for the first year classes the summer before and it helped as far as class participation, but overall, using the E&E books after learning the material is better in my opinion.

The problem is that E&E can make incredibly complex issues seem like a breeze before you get into the real complex issues. A Civ Pro example would be personal jurisdiction. E&E might make it seem easy, then in class you realize you have to go through minimum contacts, reasonableness, notice, due process, and a bunch of other tests before you can definitively state whether a court has PJ. I would still read E&E (and maybe make flash cards) to get a feel for it, but I would wait until I learned the substantive material in class before I studied E&E (outlining; deconstructing the examples).

As far as practice exams...
Learn IRAC and practice it.

One of my professors told me about the boot camp method. Take 10 practice tests for each class in the month before finals. Actually write out the answers. Then when the finals come you can organize and write essays much more effectively. You also get a really good feel for what each professor focuses on in their exam. -ken 
5/5/10 5:15 PM
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Having a quality writing sample is another reason legal research and writing is important.
5/5/10 8:05 PM
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KenTheWalrus
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Why so angry, panda bear?

There is no need to do it, it is a voluntary process. Under this method, for the last month of the class the goal is to write the best exam for that subject as taught by that professor. With writing, practice makes perfect.

I don't know anyone who has actually done 10 exams for each class, but I don't discount the theory behind the process and thought it worth mentioning here. -ken
5/6/10 6:02 AM
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greco yeoman
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Brabo - what state are you going to law school in?
5/6/10 6:02 AM
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greco yeoman
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Edited: 05/06/10 6:02 AM
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.
5/7/10 10:49 PM
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Brabo Fett
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PA
5/8/10 10:10 PM
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littleguy
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Fake Pie - I am happy to give it and have given the same advice on here and in real life many times but the response is always about the same: people don't want to hear anything negative. Unless you say "GO FOR IT, YOU WILL MAKE LOOT!!!" they pretty much get defensive and try to say why whatever you said won't apply to them.

For example, someone on the OG asked about it and when he got legitimate responses he got very defensive... flash forward and of course he has an "I am going to law school!" thread. If you made up your mind and don't want any advice, why ask?

Eh, I know, people just want their decisions reinforced. And other people (ME) just want to bitch about stuff.



I'm pretty sure you are talking about me. : (
5/12/10 11:08 AM
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Trust
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 It depends on what you want to get out of law school, and where you want to go with it.  If you already have a specialty in mind, and have some background for it, then law school is just a necessary obstacle to overcome, and I would agree foregoing casebooks and just learning the blackletter law and how to apply it. 

I was already a patent agent when I started law school and had been practicing for several years.   I went to law school because the only way to become a patent attorney is to become an attorney.  I do largely the same thing now as I did as a patent agent, only I get paid a lot more for it. 

If you want to teach law, or practice in appellate work, or if you just want to get the most out of your legal education, then I'd say reading cases is critical. 

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