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Food & Wine Ground >> Ethiopian Recipe attack!


4/15/10 8:24 PM
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Kai Tremeche
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Edited: 04/15/10 8:24 PM
Member Since: 7/6/00
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Berbere Spice/Curry mix



This is the Medium Spicy spice mix for Ethiopian Food. Used in Wats and Tibs. It's like an Ethiopian curry.

This will all be in 'parts' which means teaspoons or tablespoons or whatever, depending on the size of the batch. Try to get whole spices when possible. 4 P in my case means a Teaspoon

8 P Cumin
4 P Cardamon
2 P Allspice
1 P Clove
4 P Fenugreek (Hard to find)
4 P Coriander
4 P Black Peppercorns
2 P Dry Ginger
4 P Sea Salt
2 P Cinnamon
12-24 P Red Pepper Flake
16 P Paprika (Hot Hungarian)

Add all WHOLE spices (don't add powdered spices like ginger, salt and paprika) and to a skillet on low. Toast spices for 5 minutes, try to avoid scorching.

Allow to cool for 1 minute, then transfer to spice grinder. Add Salt, ginger and other dry spices. Grind until powdery.

Transfer to airtight lid and store refrigerated.
4/15/10 8:26 PM
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Kai Tremeche
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Miser Wet


Ingredients

* 3 c dried red or yellow lentils
* 5 c water
* 1 c vegetable broth
* 1 large anaheim (or 2 mild Jalepenos) chili, seeded and chopped (Optional)
* 1 onion, chopped fine
* 1/4 cup butter (Or Ghee)
* 1 tablespoon minced ginger
* 1 tablespoon minced garlic
* 1 tablespoon berbere, spice (See Earlier Recipe)
* 1 teaspoon black pepper

Directions

1. Boil the lentils in water for 5 minutes. Drain, reserving liquid.
2. In large pot, saute the anaheim pepper and onions in the butter until the onions are tender.
3. To the saute pot, add the lentils, 5 cups of the reserved liquid, 1 cup of vegetable broth and the rest of the ingredients and bring to a simmer. You may need to add more water to get it up to 6 cups.
4. Simmer covered over Low to Medium heat for 70 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking. It will be done when it's reached a mashed potato-like consistency.
5. Serve over Injera and with additional Injera to use to pick up the stew.

Notes:
If you need it to be Vegan, use extra virgin Olive Oil instead of butter.
Injera is a huge pain to make. Buy it instead of trying to make it, or serve this over basmati rice.
4/15/10 8:26 PM
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Kai Tremeche
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Edited: 04/15/10 8:28 PM
Member Since: 7/6/00
Posts: 23070


This is the classic Ethiopian Beef or Lamb stew that is served over injera. It's not the saute Tibs, but is more tender.

I usually serve this with the split pea dish I posted earlier, Riccotta and Ethiopian salad (Lettuce, Diced Tomato and Jalapeno pepper slices) all on over Injera. With Injera, you have to buy it. It's extremely difficult to make without the right tools.

Siga Wat



Ingredients
3 Onions - diced
3 tblsp Corn oil
1/3c Berbere spice Powder (See Previous Recipe)
2 tblsp Tomato paste
1c Water
2 lb Beef or lamb roast; cut into 2in by 1in strips

Directions
1) Fry onions in a dry pan until onions are a bit brown
2) Add oil and fry for another minute
3) Add meat and fry until meat is seared
4) Add spices and Tomato paste and fry for another 3 minutes
5) Transfer everything to stewing pot or slow cooker
6) Cover pot and cook on slow boil for 1 hour, stirring frequently. OR cook in slow-cooker for 4 hours on high.

Serve warm on fresh Injera.
4/15/10 8:27 PM
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Kai Tremeche
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Zilzil Tibs


This is a spicy beef (or venison!) saute dish that is about my absolute favorite of the Ethiopian beef dishes. Unlike the wat (stew) recipes, there shouldn't be much sauce with this, it should be more along the lines of a fajita.

As stated above, the Venison version of this is awesome.

Ingredients
2 lbs Boneless sirloin/round steak - Cut to strips 1x3in
1/3 c Water
1 Tomato - Diced
1 c Onion - Minced.
1 tsp Salt
1/4 c Niter Kebbeh (See previous recipes)
1 tblsp Melted Butter
1/4 c Berbere (See previous recipes) + 1 tblspn
1 tsp Ginger
1 tsp Black Pepper
1 clove Garlic - Minced
1/2 tsp Ground nutmeg
2 Green Indian Chili peppers. (Can substitute for a Jalapeno or Green Serrano)

Directions
1) Heat Niter Kebbeh and butter over a moderate heat in a very large skillet
2) Add 1 tablespoon of Berbere then saute beef in pan so it browns evenly.
3) Add all remaining ingredients. Stir well.
4) Simmer covered for 15 min or until beef is tender.

Serve over Injera. Serves 8.
4/15/10 8:29 PM
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Kai Tremeche
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Niter Kibbeh



This is a clarified butter which is a staple of Ethiopian cooking. Plenty of dishes need it, and it's great replacement for butter on Naan or Pita. Use whenever you need a spiced better. It is awesome brushed on grilling steak, corn, asparagus or any other grilled vegetable.

Ingredients

1 lb ghee/clarified butter OR 1 lb vegetable margarine (clarified)
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp ginger
2 tsp dried onion flake
1/2 tsp ground turmeric
1/2 tsp ground cardamom
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp black pepper
1/8 tsp ground nutmeg
1/8 tsp ground fenugreek
one whole clove bud, broken into pieces

Directions
1) Toast the ground spices in a dry hot skillet for a minute, stirring frequently to prevent scorching.
2) Remove spices.
3) Heat butter in skillet over medium heat. Bring to a 'boil' but don't let it brown.
4) Stir in the "wet" ingredients: the garlic, ginger, and onion. Cook for two minutes.
5) Add the "dry" spices and reduce heat to a very low simmer.
6) Simmer for a half hour or more.
7) Strain mixture with a cheesecloth into clean glass container with a lid. This may require multiple strainings.
8) Keep refrigerated, if made from butter, it will keep three months. If made from margarine, it will keep almost indefinitely.
4/19/10 2:41 PM
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Kai Tremeche
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Posts: 23166
No comments?
4/19/10 5:37 PM
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Kevin Curtis
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Looks very interesting... if not a bit daunting.

Haven't liked the curry dishes I've tried, so not sure if it would be my bag.

Seeing a somewhat complicated recipe like this (which I don't know what it is even supposed to taste like) gives me a bad flashback to my mole experience.

Thanks for posting though.
4/20/10 12:14 AM
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Mark1
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Posts: 36117
 Damn, now I am hungry for Ethiopian food.

Off to Blue Nile this week...

Mark
4/20/10 7:26 AM
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Kai Tremeche
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Mark: As sad as it sounds, The Blue Nile in the D sucks compared to the stuff I've had in Toronto.
4/20/10 10:23 AM
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Mark1
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Kai Tremeche - Mark: As sad as it sounds, The Blue Nile in the D sucks compared to the stuff I've had in Toronto.

 Its not bad,  I have had better and I have had worse.

But, its not as if I have a lot of choices.

Mark
4/20/10 11:23 AM
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Kai Tremeche
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Mark1: Yeah, I had to go all the way to Toronto.

I don't know if the stuff is good in the place I live in now.

This turns out pretty damn well though, but you have to be able to find the bread.,

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