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JKD UnderGround >> Awareness - as it applies to MA and life....


4/30/10 3:25 PM
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Roy Harris
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  Over a year ago, I decided to present a post on my forums about "Awareness." Since I had taught about this subject since the early 1990's, I decided to share some of what I know with those who were interested.

Below is the link. I think you will find a lot of useful information:

http://www.royharris.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6931

Enjoy!

Roy Harris
 
4/30/10 4:19 PM
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New2MMA
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Roy,

That's an outstanding thread! Thank you for that.

Mark

4/30/10 5:12 PM
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Roy Harris
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You're welcome!

Roy
4/30/10 5:51 PM
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Joe Maffei
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Hi Roy, joe here...? it's sad that people would have to ask about awareness, when to start developing it etc.

From what I understand is your subconscious mind takes in 30,000 bites of information per second and your conscious mind realizes about 10% of that. So the question is, what of that 10% should you be aware of ? I think it will be different from person to person these days because the senses have dulled do to lifestyle..
4/30/10 6:28 PM
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Roy Harris
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Hey Joe,

From my perspective, I don't think it's "sad" that people have to ask about awareness. I think it is great that people ask about things they don't know about.

Also, to think that we are  all "aware", I believe, is naive. Awareness, which is both "focus" and "unfocused" vision (as well as the use of our other senses), is something that can be learned and developed by all.

I have enjoyed sharing this knowledge with those who are curious! In my new instructional DVDs, I will actually have one DVD devoted to the topic of awareness :-)

Roy
4/30/10 9:04 PM
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m.g
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So is awareness using (or I should say directing or focusing) your "senses" including "intuition"?
4/30/10 11:14 PM
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Roy Harris
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m.g.,

There are several forms of "awareness." The form of awareness that I wrote about in the thread refer to the use of one's senses - the lowest level of awareness (but yet a very important foundation to build).

Roy
5/1/10 9:26 AM
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Joe Maffei
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I guess, but if people ask question about things they don't know they are just un-educated and that's fine When I think folks are unaware "they know", it's just not reregistering, day dreaming, distracted and so on. They may run in for a pizza see the meter maid in the corner of their eye but just are not aware she is heading their way. People see clouds and are unaware which direction they are moving or that the clouds have changed from cumulus to stratus and get caught in the rain. Many are to busy focusing on other things because there is no consequence to not being aware, that's why when personal come back from Iraq/Afgan some need to be de sensitized, there awareness is in heighten almost to the point of paranoia. To be trained to be aware of suspicious people, that would be called "profiling' workers at airports and such are trained for that. Folks interested in this could apply for that type of job TSA (whether you take the job or not) get the training FREE and there would be no need to purchase any material DVD or otherwise and you could save your students $$$ and they would get hands on experience.

I take folks out tracking deer, they walk right by the sign, step on wild strawberries, sit in poison ivy, and have now clue which direction their camp is?

Your senses ( seeing, smelling, hearing, tasting, touching and the sixth intuition) are not the lowest, but just the opposite they are the highest, they give your brain information your conscious mind could not pick up.
5/2/10 4:50 AM
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Roy Harris
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Um......OK  :-)
5/3/10 11:38 PM
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Edge08
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Edited: 05/03/10 11:44 PM
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A quote from one of the last post on Roy's awareness thread.

"What's yours telegraphic motion (and how do you get rid of it)?"

Pretty cool. Ask the right question, get a smart answer. BTW, the answer to that first question (on the aforementioned post) is 'if I step and land on my heel I'm shifting to attack and if I step with on the ball, it's defensive. (somebody was taking notes in your seminars)

JKD if anything, is a process of self-discovery. While it is a lot fun to figure out how to get better at escaping side mount with the least possible effort, wouldn't it be even better to be aware of all the steps it took to get trapped down there to begin with? And avoid it.<br /><br />As Sifu Dan used to say, 'Keep on truckin.'
5/9/10 11:15 PM
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Roy Harris
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Edge08,

Here's a little more on awareness, specific to our journey with Jiu Jitsu:

When it comes to escaping from the side mount position, at the intermediate level, there are twelve (12) possible positions a person can place their weight when your back is on the ground:
  1. Left side of your body at the belly button level.
  2. Center of the body at the belly button level.
  3. Right side of the body at the belly button level.
  4. On the ground at the belly button level.
  5. Left side of your body at the center of the chest.
  6. Center of the body at the center of the chest.
  7. Right side of the body at the center of the chest.
  8. On the ground at the center of the chest.
  9. Left side of your body at or above the clavicle.
  10. Center of the body at or above the clavicle.
  11. Right side of the body at or above the clavicle.
  12. On the ground  at or above the clavicle.
Where your opponent places their weight during their side mount hold down determines which techniques are "appropriate/efficient", as well as which ones ARE NOT appropriate/efficient.

Add to this equation SIX additional factors (besides weight distribution) and you can see how side mount escapes can become a very complex endeavor to learn, train and become proficient at.

Having an awareness to weight distribution is a great start to learning how to move from effectiveness towards efficiency - a recognizable trait in the JKD I practice :-)

Good training to you,

Roy Harris

5/10/10 10:16 PM
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twinkletoesCT
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Mr. Harris,

I'd like my private lesson in August to be about the six additional factors (or whichever ones we don't cover in the posture seminar)...at least, as much as we can cover in 2 hours of private lesson.

Thanks in advance. :)

~Chris
5/11/10 9:29 AM
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Joe Maffei
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Hey Roy that is an excellent explanation and map of the weight points of the mid line when your back is on the ground. It got me thinking, wouldn't there be a corresponding weight point where your back meets the ground making it actually 24 points, 12 pressing down and 12 pushing up? Similar to a nail, the point of contact where the hammer meets the head and the point of contact where the nail meets the wood, the transfer of energy from one point to another and forming a line so to speak connecting the two. In addition would not the inhalation and exhalation with the expanding and contracting of the lungs actually make the line fluctuate? And going one step further would not the surface supporting the body play into this concept, a soft surface, snow, sand, mud and even a cushy mat contoured around the body dispersing the weight point itself? And if the initial point changes moment to moment as in real time how can the laymen the non expert escape side position

As you stated escaping side mount can be very complex endeavor to learn.

Thinking a bit further I thought wow that's way to scientific for the simple minded lug heads who I train, most would not have the patients to go into such detail. So what would be the readers digest version, or "escaping the side mount for dummies" be?
thanks
J.M.
5/11/10 4:23 PM
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Roy Harris
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Chris,

Oh.........I see. NOW you wanna go over this stuff ;-)

No problemo mi hermanito! We can go over this info in CT :-)

------------

Joe,

You hit the nail on the head brother! There are some martial art students who are NOT INTERESTED in learning anything of real depth or substance. They come to class to learn, but they tend to lean towards "the shallow" and "the simple." There's nothing wrong with this method of learning. Some of these "experiential" students can kick, punch, elbow, knee, trap and grapple with the best of them. Unfortunately, many of them never seem to develop a high level of finesse in their movements, techniques or stratagem!

With those kind of students, I keep things simple. I don't push them into the "Cerebral."

On the other side of that same coin are the students who lack the required "stick-tu-itive-ness" to stay the course and do the work required to get them to that next level. To them, the idea of spending four to six months, four to six hours each week (a total of 156 hours of isolated training), working on their jab or working on their side mount escapes seems way too boring or unfulfilling. They don't fully comprehend that LEARNING is the easy part of training. They also don't understand that PRACTICING / DEVELOPING (i.e. consistent, focused and extended effort ON ONE ELEMENT / ASPECT) is the hardest part of the equation!

With those kind of students (the lazy ones), I also keep things simple. They may SAY they want to move their skill sets to the next level, but when it boils down to observing their disciplined efforts over an extended period of time, they really lack in this area (because they tend to practice the things they are good at, or the things they like to practice, over and over again - hence, they stay at the same skill level for an extended period of time without any sign of progress).

So, as an instructor, I can only lead the student as far as they desire to go. If the student only wants to experience the euphoria of learning, that's as far as I can take them. If the student only wants to experience the adrenaline drop of isolated and full-on sparring, that's as far as I can take them. While I could certainly make the effort to force my will upon the student, and I know others that do so, that is not my way of teaching.

With those students who are truly interested in going deeper into their training, I try to provide them with the necessary mental tools they need to develop into a "finesse oriented practitioner." This kind of practitioner has the chance of truly becoming a "Master" of their chosen art. While anyone can become a brute within a chosen art (meaning they can kick butt, take names and "repra-sent"), it takes diligent effort to learn AND PRACTICE the subtle details required to present and perform the art to a diverse group of people (some of whom will be brutes, others of whom will be lazy [plain and simple], others who will be cerebral, others who will have "challenges" [mental, physical, psychological, emotional, etc...] , and still others who are a combination of all four).

So, for those who are truly interested in pursuing the more cerebral (i.e. "advanced") areas of Jiu Jitsu (or JKD, Kali or Savate for that matter), I will give them a morsel of truth and then watch what they do with it. If they practice it and make progress, they will always come back to me and ask a question related to a discovery they had while practicing what I had taught to them. If they don't ask any questions, I know they either (a) have not spent the required time, or (b) they are intelligent and have made the same observations other intelligent students have made over the years. If that (i.e. "b") is the case, I know the student will always come back to me with an observation (one made with a great amount of detailed information) AND a follow-up question.

So, as an instructor, I allow the student to dictate how far we will go in our journey together. if they only want to go to the "experiential" level, I'm OK with that - as long as they are happy with THEIR CHOICE. If they only want to "learn", and not develop into their full potential, I'm OK with that as well - again, as long as they are happy with THEIR CHOICE. If they want everything (meaning, they want an education - not just some information), they will always show forth the diligent effort. How can I be so sure of this? Simple:

"People always PURSUE the things that interest them! ALWAYS!"

Now, to give you the reader's digest version of escaping the side mount, here it is:
  1. Turn onto and stay on your side at all times.
  2. Place your arms in posture.
  3. Apply pressure in the appropriate direction.
  4. Go to your knees every time.

Good training to you Joe,

Roy Harris

P.S. When I give a reader's digest version of a technique, people usually ask, "What do you mean by this?", or "What did you mean by that?" For example, after reading this post, I anticipate reading questions like:
  • How far should I turn onto my side?
  • What part of my body should be in contact with my opponent's body?
  • What do you mean by posture?
  • Which posture should I use?
  • How do I deal with this guy in class who outweighs me by 80 pounds?
  • What do I do when my opponent cross-faces me?
  • What do I do when my opponent crushes my posture?
  • What is the "appropriate direction" to apply the pressure of posture?
  • How do I go to my knees when my opponent..........
  • Etc.....

So, while reader's digest versions are good for some students, I have found that they generally not good for all. Why do I write that? Because I have a computer full of questions I have answered over the years. More than 2000 pages to be precise ;-)

Enjoy!
5/11/10 9:18 PM
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twinkletoesCT
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Gracias, Señor.

I've always wanted to go over this stuff, but I wasn't sure I was ready yet. I've been playing with posture-only (the way you showed it in Erie) and I'm making oodles of discoveries. I am feeling ready to explore this at length! :) :)
5/11/10 10:38 PM
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Roy Harris
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Very cool ;-)

The "posture-only" method I showed you in Erie is an entry way into developing "sensitivity" specific to side mount escapes. Plus, it has a few other "nice" uses!

See you in Rochester?

Roy
5/12/10 9:37 AM
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twinkletoesCT
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Definitely. Looking forward to seeing how you present leglocks in 2010 :) :)
5/12/10 11:43 AM
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Roy Harris
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Cool !

It's similar to the old stuff, but more refined / organized / easy to remember ! )


5/14/10 11:44 AM
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Boyscout
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Roy Harris - Edge08,

Here's a little more on awareness, specific to our journey with Jiu Jitsu:

When it comes to escaping from the side mount position, at the intermediate level, there are twelve (12) possible positions a person can place their weight when your back is on the ground:
<ol> <li>Left side of your body at the belly button level.</li> <li>Center of the body at the belly button level.</li> <li>Right side of the body at the belly button level.</li> <li>On the ground at the belly button level.</li> <li>Left side of your body at the center of the chest.</li> <li>Center of the body at the center of the chest.</li> <li>Right side of the body at the center of the chest.</li> <li>On the ground at the center of the chest.</li> <li>Left side of your body at or above the clavicle.</li> <li>Center of the body at or above the clavicle.</li> <li>Right side of the body at or above the clavicle.</li> <li>On the ground  at or above the clavicle.</li></ol>Where your opponent places their weight during their side mount hold down determines which techniques are "appropriate/efficient", as well as which ones ARE NOT appropriate/efficient.

Add to this equation SIX additional factors (besides weight distribution) and you can see how side mount escapes can become a very complex endeavor to learn, train and become proficient at.

Having an awareness to weight distribution is a great start to learning how to move from effectiveness towards efficiency - a recognizable trait in the JKD I practice :-)

Good training to you,

<b>Roy Harris</b>



Take it from me, this is gold dust on so many levels. If the guys in your gym are not going this far, you will be tapping them in six weeks.

I do this with my Sera stand up and I am out boxing boxers at 45 years of age.

Depth is the answer, don't short change your self.

Regards

Richard
5/15/10 2:54 AM
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Red Stuff
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Roy Harris - Chris,

Oh.........I see. NOW you wanna go over this stuff ;-)

No problemo mi hermanito! We can go over this info in CT :-)

------------
etc etc

Because I have a computer full of questions I have answered over the years. More than 2000 pages to be precise ;-)

Enjoy!


This is the most amazing post I've ever seen. On any forum.

Please tell us you're going to do something with those 2000 or so pages.
5/25/10 5:22 PM
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Roy Harris
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Thank you Red Stuff!

I'll be adding several of those pages to the book I am writing.

Roy
8/9/10 4:11 PM
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twinkletoesCT
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Thanks for the private lesson this past weekend. I will get right to work on it.

For others on this thread -- I took my 2 hour private lesson, and we went over the NINE factors (revised list) of side mount hold-downs and how they influence your escapes. And we did it on the heels of a 2-day seminar just on "posture" :)

BRING ON THE GEEK-LEVEL BJJ!
8/13/10 12:39 PM
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alvo69
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Edited: 08/13/10 1:09 PM
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TTT for  AWARENESS. Including me, I think there are like three people in all of Chicago that are aware of WTF is going on around them, the rest have Ipods / Ipads / Driods et al. shoved up their ass, and are like carnival ducks before the cabbies, texting douchehole cage drivers, gang bangers, thieves, and general vermin  that abounds this vortex of the vapid.  I will print your forum's post to study and pass along. THANKS for sharing. Really. Be Well. Alex   - " I'm LISTENING "
1/24/11 3:17 AM
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jittaz
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1/24/11 11:00 AM
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WidespreadPanic
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I'm working on awareness now in regard to being safe before getting out of the car.

My partner and I pull up to a parking space and even though we just finished discussing it, we open the doors while still seat belted in and start to get out.

THEN after a face palm, we re-lock the doors, and we survey the area and exit with full awareness of our surroundings.

I can NOT figure out the method to getting out of the car safely, the habit is just so ingrained to open the door while still freaking belted in.



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