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SBGI >> Getting reps in


5/6/10 2:01 PM
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acid jazz
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I know SBG is all about aliveness.

Does anyone think there is any value to rehearsing a technique solo?

Say going through the motions of getting an armbar several hundered times a day at home without a partner?

Getting your reps in as much as you can because finding someone willing to do a technique for a hundred plus reps is not always easy.

Anyway, think there is any value to this?
5/6/10 2:52 PM
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Matt Thornton
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 I think doing several hundred armbars a day, solo (on a dummy, etc), is a tragic waste of time. And is just as likely to make your technique worse. Instead I would advise doing a few perfect armbars, with no resistance on a living person, and then slowly adding in progressive resistance. For details go here, all the various methods for drilling, and things to consider when doing so, are listed:

http://aliveness101.blogspot.com/

5/6/10 2:57 PM
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acid jazz
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Matt Thornton -  I think doing several hundred armbars a day, solo (on a dummy, etc), is a tragic waste of time. And is just as likely to make your technique worse. Instead I would advise doing a few perfect armbars, with no resistance on a living person, and then slowly adding in progressive resistance. For details go here, all the various methods for drilling, and things to consider when doing so, are listed:

http://aliveness101.blogspot.com/

Matt,

Thanks. Another question. What can a person do, if anything to improve their game while alone? I am going to check out the link, if that is covered there please disregard my question.

Supposedly a person needs 10,000-30,000 reps to master a technique. I can't see anyone realistically hitting these numbers with a live training partner. Maybe those number are wrong, or maybe they mean a level of mastery that is just ridiculous and not a just being skilled at a move.

Thanks for your answer.
5/6/10 4:19 PM
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Matt Thornton
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I could list for you some top BJJ black belts, who have never done a dead rep beyond the few dozen we use in the introduction stage of the 'I' method (see article). At best that empirical statement requires a whole lot of qualifications, at worst it's amongst a long line of myths.

As far as training solo, your best use of time when alone is conditioning. I'd suggest a good fundamental weight program, squats, pull ups, etc, and also some solid physical based yoga.

If you want to be good at BJJ, roll. And when your done doing that, roll some more.
6/5/10 2:48 PM
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Matt Thornton
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Drilling shots is an excellent form of exercise. It helps develop all the muscle movements required for that sort of activity. That is something we do, again on the "I"method scale it would be what we would consider the introduction stage. However, no wrestling coach I am aware of, has wrestlers drill shots solo, and then go straight into matches. Smart coaches move from the introduction stage, to the isolation stage, where those same shots are drilled against progressively resisting partners. This is exactly what we do. By contrast, many BJJ schools will rep without resistance techniques, and then 'roll'. This is a faulty method at best. If your interested in our approach then read here, it lays it all out in great detail: http://aliveness101.blogspot.com/ Then if you still have questions, let me know.
6/8/10 3:41 AM
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Jorx
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I'd add that "dead" reps are more useful on self-initiated skills. I mean noone would argue against basketball free-throw dead reps.

Ergo "dead repping" punches and initiating a shot (shadowboxing, shadowwrestling) might be far more useful than dead repping a sidemount escape.
6/8/10 10:18 AM
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acid jazz
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Jorx - I'd add that "dead" reps are more useful on self-initiated skills. I mean noone would argue against basketball free-throw dead reps.

Ergo "dead repping" punches and initiating a shot (shadowboxing, shadowwrestling) might be far more useful than dead repping a sidemount escape.
Interesting comment, I have heard of fighters that practiced hundreds of kicks day, similar to your comment.

An area I have wondered about is bodycontrol type drills, ginastica natural and grapplers toolbox stuff and I think one of Rickson's black belts swore that a series of solo drills greatly improved his game and made up for a lack of mat time.
6/10/10 11:46 AM
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Luis Gutierrez
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I have always enjoyed all the shadow wrestling, shadow boxing, animal movement, classic body weight, and body flow material as a solo workout, class warm up or cool down and when our gym was competitive, it was always part of the training right alongside partner drills. Nowadays that has developed into blending sessions with kettle bells, clubs, and yoga for many at our gym.

We must keep in mind is that time is a huge factor among those over a certain age (college, family, etc)and if limited on time, you must do what the activity is all the time. So for most, roll if you wish to improve rolling. Solo work is to heal, refine, maintain, relax the mind through complex movements, body awareness with breathing etc.

An example would be SLD running. So many knowck that training down because of more efficient methods to build the type of cardio you need for the combative sports but forget much of it is for mental clarity and toughness. Its alternative training around the core functional work for athletes that have the time and space to do it and can greatly improve performance but avoiding burn out in training or off "season" by providing athletes "off time" that is still keeping their heads in the game.

Just my 2 cents,

-Luis
6/20/10 5:05 AM
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Jorx
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Actually Luis, SLD is really making it's comeback as a "functional" tool;) but you are correct in all.

One can draw a continuum between self-iniated and self paced (closed) and open skills. The usefulness of "dead" training depends on where the specific skill lies on that continuum.

Look into motor learning subject in sport psych if you're more interested.
7/5/10 2:20 AM
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jkd4200
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What do you think about Burton Richardson doing hundreds of reps on the bubba dummy?
7/14/10 3:10 AM
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Jorx
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jkd4200 - What do you think about Burton Richardson doing hundreds of reps on the bubba dummy?


I think it's time better spent elseways.
10/23/10 6:40 PM
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HoldYerGround
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I plan to write a short response to the SBGi aliveness theory. What literature do you guys recommend I be familiar with before doing so?
10/24/10 1:39 AM
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acid jazz
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HoldYerGround - I plan to write a short response to the SBGi aliveness theory. What literature do you guys recommend I be familiar with before doing so?
Looking forward to this. I love SBG, but it is always good to hear another viewpoint.
11/13/10 5:38 AM
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GFG
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if i want to get in some good reps i try and find a grappling dummy (anyone that's not at your level) and if i want to work arm bars i'll just guide the roll and continue to hit arm bars meanwhile my grappling dummy just thinks he's rolling for his life and doesn't even realize i'm just trying to rep out arm bars or whatever else i'm trying to focus on.
11/15/10 1:32 AM
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jkd4200
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jkd4200 - What do you think about Burton Richardson doing hundreds of reps on the bubba dummy?



Interested in matts opinion on a high level and known instructor like Burton promoting the BUBBA...


BTW, I have a SM and i love it. My triangles got very strong from burning out the sqeeze for conditioning... i practice certain grips from guard as well and break down techniques from that day of rolling.
11/15/10 5:21 PM
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Matt Thornton
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If you have time in your life to do thousands of 'reps' on a stuffed dummy you either A) need to find more human training partners, or B) find more interesting things to do with you time.
11/16/10 5:05 PM
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jkd4200
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thats funny...

jkd/bjj is on my mind all the time... sometimes its 11pm and i want to look at a certain grip... i have a dummy with a gi on, so i remember to drill it with my partners the next day.


but i guess Burton and I should find better things to do...

:)

Do you plan on having Duby come train at your school in the future?
11/17/10 2:52 PM
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Matt Thornton
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If Daniel comes to the States I am sure he will visit the gym. That is a long journey for him.
11/21/10 9:10 PM
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HoldYerGround
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 Matt, can you please consider my above question.
11/24/10 12:11 PM
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Matt Thornton
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It isn't hard to find written material. The website is full of articles, as is my blog: http://aliveness101.blogspot.com/
11/25/10 10:06 AM
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PKF
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"the word is not the thing"

it would be most beneficial to your experience/POV if you were to put some rounds in using the "I" method...and then proceeded to write the response.
11/26/10 2:57 PM
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john joe
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HoldYerGround - I plan to write a short response to the SBGi aliveness theory. What literature do you guys recommend I be familiar with before doing so?


how can you can plan to write a response to something you are unfamiliar with?
12/6/10 1:02 PM
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HoldYerGround
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Many things related to training methods are not concrete or written in stone. Some literature will say one thing on the subject while other sources will support contradictory methods.
12/7/10 6:39 AM
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john joe
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right, what i mean is - if i havent read a book or whatever, its presumption on my part to say I am going to sit down a write a response to it. First I have to read it, and determine whether i agree or disagree with it, and whether or not it actually warrants me writing a response to it.

By stating that you arent familiar with the material yet but you intend to write a response to it, you're saying you're going to reading it with the intention to pick holes in it; it pre-supposes a negative approach to the material you are intending to read.
12/8/10 3:54 AM
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HoldYerGround
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I see no problem with reading such material with the intention of picking holes in it. Its supposed to be scientific. It should be able to withstand scrutiny. Maybe the information will be more or less infalible and my response will be composed of

Anyway my intention was to try and avoid rebutals like "well if you were familiar with the work of Russkichev, coach of the USSR National Judo team, you would see your evidence has been expanded upon in a direction that negates your conclusion."

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