UnderGround Forums
 

Roy Harris >> Experiences with Chinese Internal Martial Artists?


8/19/10 5:38 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
The Gimp
7 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 10/3/04
Posts: 3277
 
Hello Roy and Roy's community,

I am thinking about taking a Chinse IMA such as tai chi, hsing-yi, and bag gua zhang.

I know that these arts are good for stress reduction and relaxation. Wondering if there is any actual martial benefit to training the techniques. For example will training tai chi push hands improve my standing clinch game, which is currently based on greco (pummeling, bodylocks, and armdrags)?

Have you ever had a friendly spar with someone who was able to apply techniques from any of these arts in a realistic manner, against realistic situations?

Thanks for your interest.

Best,
Matt
9/21/10 3:22 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Radd
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 9/28/08
Posts: 8
I have experience in Tai Chi and Push Hands. Tai Chi incorporates a lot of throws (among other things) based on redirection, absorption, and rooting. From my own personal experience, it is best to look towards Tai Chi as a means of dealing with shoves, grabs, and aggressive behavior.

That said, mostly all the Tai Chi training you perform is designed as a means of moving meditation. Very few people teach Tai Chi for self defense. Very few people even know the self defense applications.

Additionally, Tai Chi practice is based on forms which are designed to simultaneous present and hide many of the theories and techniques. In order to get to the core of what is found in Tai Chi requires an understanding of how to get beyond the outer presentation and into the core of the real meaning behind the movements. This can take a lot of work when you are new to the study of traditional Chinese arts.

Push hands, BTW, has long since been performed for competition. Getting involved in comeptitive push hands might prove to be a lot of fun for someone that enjoys grappling.
10/23/10 6:00 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
HoldYerGround
167 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 10/10/08
Posts: 1239
According to the Chinese internal martial arts dude who guest spoke to my chinese medicine class, Tai Ji is "Not good for fighting"  
1/21/11 1:33 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Roy Harris
26 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 2449
From what little I remember of Tai Chi, it is not a style of martial arts designed for realism in self-defense. This doesn't mean it has no value in that arena, but rather, it's original intention is not "realism." Can certain elements of it be used to defend one's life? Of course! Any style of martial arts can be used for self-defense. However, self-defense needs to be distinguished from fighting. They are not the same, in my way of thinking and defining.

Within the realm of martial arts, there are five main disciplines:

Traditional
Eclectic
Sportive
Holistic
Combative

Tai Chi falls into the "Holistic style" of martial arts - where the emphasis is mainly on stress reduction and the development of "internal" matters (pun intended).

Roy


Reply Post

You must log in to post a reply. Click here to login.