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10/7/10 8:30 AM
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ChanceDuBois
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What is your opinion of this?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJvb6Bhily4&feature=related
10/7/10 8:32 AM
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ChanceDuBois
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Another one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6TBAedCxss&feature=related
10/7/10 4:20 PM
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ChanceDuBois
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Can someone with a blue name post these please?

They are on British TV and whenever my daughter sees them she is instantly mesmerised (she's one and a half). I find them somewhat creepy though, especially the first one, and I have misgivings about letting her watch them.

They seem to have a new agey religious aspect to them and I wonder what the influences are.
10/7/10 5:38 PM
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Grakman
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Edited: 10/07/10 5:38 PM
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10/7/10 5:40 PM
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Grakman
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10/7/10 5:41 PM
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Grakman
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Creepy as hell. Even the music sounds like something out of a weird horror movie.
10/8/10 10:36 AM
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ChanceDuBois
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Thanks for posting.

Here is what the BBC say about waybuloo:

Waybuloo is a unique exploration of emotions and relationships, specially created for pre-school children. At its heart, Waybuloo is a philosophy for a happy life with uplifting themes of happiness and harmony, brought vividly to life through a combination of live action and cutting-edge CGI animation. Together, the four animated Piplings interact with real children to explore and experience natural and spontaneous routes to happiness: through warmth, friendship, co-operation and citizenship.

In each episode, six children – known as Cheebies – visit Nara to help the Piplings explore new situations and the emotions that arise from them. Social concepts such as sharing, respect for others and harmony are explored with gentle humour and understanding. Cheebies and viewers at home experience how to use these skills to relate to friends, family and the world around them. Through Waybuloo, children learn that everything is better together and are encouraged to participate with the show as the Piplings often speak directly to them.

When a Pipling is truly happy, does something good or makes another feel better, they achieve Buloo – a warm feeling of emotional harmony that is experienced as floating. A hug or a helping hand results in a small moment of Buloo. When children, Piplings and viewers co-operate, everyone achieves a shared moment of discovery or happiness, then Buloo is experienced as euphoric dancing, spinning and floating above the treetops and amongst the clouds.


I've decided to stop my children watching it because I don't want the BBC teaching them a "philosophy for a happy life" with what look like buddist or other eastern religious overtones.

10/8/10 11:13 AM
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Grakman
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 ' a warm feeling of emotional harmony that is experienced as floating, with euphoric dancing, spinning and floating above the treetops and amonst the clouds.'

Sounds like a drug-induced high. :P 

Barney, the Teletubbies, Piplings... whatever happened to the Thunder Cats and Scooby Doo??
10/11/10 5:50 AM
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ChanceDuBois
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Edited: 10/11/10 6:53 AM
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It's actually pretty difficult to locate kids tv in the UK that doesn't have some kind of political, religious or philosophical message. What's wrong with just providing entertainment?
10/11/10 10:45 AM
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CJJScout
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Al Mohler has been catching some heat for comments he made about yoga. I agree with him, and wouldn't let my kids watch that kind of stuff.
10/11/10 4:03 PM
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Ridgeback
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ChanceDuBois - It's actually pretty difficult to locate kids tv in the UK that doesn't have some kind of political, religious or philosophical message. What's wrong with just providing entertainment?

 I don't trust a person who has a strong interest in indoctrinating other people's kids.  I would never try to circumvent an atheist father's authority with his kids and I expect secular humanists to return the favor.  But they don't and they are the sleazier for it.  

Of course that is one of many reasons we don't have a tv in our house.
10/11/10 5:05 PM
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ChanceDuBois
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"I don't trust a person who has a strong interest in indoctrinating other people's kids. I would never try to circumvent an atheist father's authority with his kids and I expect secular humanists to return the favor. But they don't and they are the sleazier for it."

You would hate Britain I think. There is a pretty strong move towards state intervention in child raising. This is from our state TV channel, the BBC.

I wouldn't have any problem with a show that openly advertised that it was Buddhist or new age or whatever (I would just avoid letting my kids watch it), but the available info about this show makes no mention of what the influences actually are. I can see there is some kind of spiritual and philosophical element here, but I have no idea what it is. It's not knowing that makes me suspicious.
10/13/10 12:12 AM
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Ridgeback
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ChanceDuBois - "I don't trust a person who has a strong interest in indoctrinating other people's kids. I would never try to circumvent an atheist father's authority with his kids and I expect secular humanists to return the favor. But they don't and they are the sleazier for it."

You would hate Britain I think. There is a pretty strong move towards state intervention in child raising. This is from our state TV channel, the BBC.

I wouldn't have any problem with a show that openly advertised that it was Buddhist or new age or whatever (I would just avoid letting my kids watch it), but the available info about this show makes no mention of what the influences actually are. I can see there is some kind of spiritual and philosophical element here, but I have no idea what it is. It's not knowing that makes me suspicious.

 It really isn't different here with PBS, which is government supported TV.  It is also why I won't put my child through the public school system.  I know a lot of people who went into education or are in it now and the number of them who have no qualms about indoctrinating other people's children is disturbing.  
10/13/10 3:27 AM
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ChanceDuBois
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Are you planning to pay for private schooling or will you educate your own child at home?
10/13/10 4:05 AM
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Ridgeback
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ChanceDuBois - Are you planning to pay for private schooling or will you educate your own child at home?

 Still working out the details.  He is only one as of a week ago so we have some time. The city we live in is actually very home school friendly and has a lot of non-standardized charter schools.  A parent can even teach a standard curriculum at home and have all the materials paid for by the state.  Since I pay my property taxes I might try to find ways of selectively getting the state to pay for things, but if there is no choice it will be private school or home schooling with tutors.  I teach for a living so I could do the home school thing if I needed to.  But I think it is important for kids to work with other teachers and experience the pressure of negative and positive feedback.  I am not against public school just because a lot of people are looking to indoctrinate my kid.  There are issues with the quality of education, No Child Left Behind standardized testing, and putting a boy through a female dominated school system.
10/13/10 7:50 AM
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ChanceDuBois
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We have two girls, one is in school and the other is about the same age as your boy. My experience of what is being taught now makes me pretty sure that something has changed quite radically since I was in school, mostly in terms of the intensity of indoctrination but with some quality decline as well. I think that private would probably be the best way to go (at least in terms of gaming the system as it stands) but unfortunately we can't afford it where we live now. Home schooling is actively discouraged in Britain with state inspections of what you are teaching, requirements to follow the national curriculum, and so on. We are currently weighing up the options.
10/13/10 10:02 AM
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CJJScout
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Our church has a covenant school that my wife taught at before our first was born. Lord willing, we will send them there. Some folks in our circle of friends can't afford it, even though it is very reasonable as far as private schools go, and elect to home school. I don't know how they do it.
10/13/10 7:27 PM
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Ridgeback
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ChanceDuBois - We have two girls, one is in school and the other is about the same age as your boy. My experience of what is being taught now makes me pretty sure that something has changed quite radically since I was in school, mostly in terms of the intensity of indoctrination but with some quality decline as well. I think that private would probably be the best way to go (at least in terms of gaming the system as it stands) but unfortunately we can't afford it where we live now. Home schooling is actively discouraged in Britain with state inspections of what you are teaching, requirements to follow the national curriculum, and so on. We are currently weighing up the options.

 England used to be very much into private education at one time.  I think the fact that it is discouraged should tell us something about motives.  I do think that having a strong parental influence on education can help a lot in these situations.  The real issue is when parents take a passive role and leave it up to the schools to educated them about all manner of things that go well beyond core subjects.  You can establish a dialectic kind of thing whereby the teacher tells them something at school and then you encourage them to think  about  what was said in a more critical way.
10/14/10 3:48 AM
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ChanceDuBois
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Edited: 10/14/10 3:50 AM
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I guess that's the low budget option! I already do this with the older girl but children are very receptive to what teachers tell them and what their friends believe. I'm sure it has a subtle effect. There's also the risk of the child returning to school and telling the teacher that daddy said what you are teaching is wrong. You have to be careful.

It's home schooling that is positively discouraged in this country (said to be used as a cover for child abuse and so subject to inspections). I wouldn't want to risk having social services in my home personally. Private is still recognised as by far the highest quality education in the country and there are some great private schools here, but demand is very high and the price is prohibitive. It is very much for the elite, at least in the south east where we live. We have some savings though and it might be an option when they are older. Fee paid places for poorer kids are also available.

The irony is that the people responsible for the dire state of the comprehensive school system are very unlikely to send their own children there. Nothing shows the contempt of the ruling class for normal people more than the school system.
10/14/10 4:52 AM
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Ridgeback
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 The vast majority of Congress members send their children to private schools in the US as well.  They pander to unions and then keep their children away from the effects of their policies.  Nothing new there I guess.

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