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S&C UnderGround >> best way to fix this shoulder injury?


11/20/10 3:48 AM
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nottheface
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I was doing jerks off the rack about a month ago and I had a pretty good workout, but my shoulder was sore that night. I thought it was just muscle soreness but I think it's something else. Runs across the center of my right deltoid.

Hurts when I push, can't bench or military press at even 135lbs. I can do an empty bar though, but even a warm up load will make it hurt. I've been resting it, but it still bothers me, and now I've noticed it's stiff enough that it hurts when I grip the bar when I squat. Am I making it worse with all this rest? What's the right way to start working it out again, I don't want to aggravate it again and start back at square one.
11/20/10 8:59 AM
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Chocolate Shatner
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why were you jerking off in a rack?
11/20/10 2:35 PM
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YourDumbFace
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Is it a constant pain or does it only become aggravated after pressing? I know for myself I've been having lots of issues with overuse irritation and for me it comes down to moderating volume during the week (ie: one day with no overhead work) and lots of shoulder mobility.

A lot of my issues came with poor lockout technique during the jerk, where I wouldn't have my scapulas pulled back to keep the weight behind my head, therefore leaving lots of force on my shoulders. I don't know how your technique is, but that's a possibility.

There's always the route of going to a sports medicine dr, and maybe Matt can come on here and help with a diagnosis. I'd recommend to hammer some fish oil, mobilize the shoulder, work on cleans without jerks, pulls and squatting to keep fitness up while using very light weights for anything overhead. Make sure your technique is sound then go from there. That was a ramble, but I hope it helped some.
11/22/10 9:23 PM
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nottheface
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The pain isn't there most of the time. Pretty much only when I'm making a pressing motion or engaging the muscle (propping myself up on the floor for example).

I've been resting the shoulder a lot, and yes, I do leave my jerks a little too far forward sometimes. I'm mostly wondering how much I should be resting the shoulder and how much I should be working it. I made the mistake of not letting a wrist injury rest before and it took 6 months to heal. All the light work, and stretching was actually just slowing down the healing process in that case.
11/22/10 10:20 PM
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OneScoup
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That is where your rotator cuff goes into the shoulder. Do some rehab exercises and welcome to the club.

I'm at a point where I do PT lifts regularly and only do pushups with elbows tucked into sides, no pressing lifts. Hopefully you don't get this bad.
11/22/10 10:47 PM
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nottheface
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What are some good pt lifts for the rotator cuff?
11/22/10 10:59 PM
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DaveM
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"That is where your rotator cuff goes into the shoulder."

This is not accurate. The rotator cuff is not a single muscle; it is a group of many muscles and does not "go into the shoulder" at any one specific point.

There are plenty of good rehab/pt rotator cuff exercises on youtube so just do a search. You'll notice a lot of overlap between the videos which is indicative of the more commonly prescribed exercises.

Realistically, once you've had a rotator cuff injury, you will always be highly susceptible to recurring injury in the future so it is VERY important to incorporate some of these exercises into your regular routine on a permanent basis. I always include a few of these exercises as part or my warm-up before lifting or training.
11/22/10 11:56 PM
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MattB ATC
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Rotator cuff work is good, but I'd focus pretty heavily on scapular work and thoracic mobility as well. You can do all of the rotator cuff work you want, but if you lack the proper scapular positioning and thoracic mobility, you will still be predisposed to injury. I regularly have people with shoulder injuries reference article/link below:

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_repair/pushups_face_pulls_and_shrugs
11/23/10 12:48 AM
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nottheface
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Edited: 11/23/10 1:05 AM
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Thanks

One other question, so if I sit with my back against the wall and have my elbows bent, upper arms 90 degrees out to the side. My shoulder "pinches" if I rotate my arms up so the back of my hand touches the wall as well. Is this a rotator cuff issue or a scapular issue?
11/23/10 1:32 AM
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DaveM
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Great article!

Depends on where you're feeling the pain but it sounds like more of a rotator cuff issue / impingement.
11/23/10 2:00 AM
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MattB ATC
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nottheface - Thanks

One other question, so if I sit with my back against the wall and have my elbows bent, upper arms 90 degrees out to the side. My shoulder "pinches" if I rotate my arms up so the back of my hand touches the wall as well. Is this a rotator cuff issue or a scapular issue?


Where is the pain when you do that motion? I think you had said that the pain you had was mid deltoid musculature. Is it still there with that motion?

DaveM - Great article!

Depends on where you're feeling the pain but it sounds like more of a rotator cuff issue / impingement.


Scapular and rotator cuff issues are generally tied in together. If a person has a rotator cuff impingement occurring, proper scapular positioning is what is going to fix the problem, not necessarily working the rotator cuff. The best analogy I have is to compare the scapula and rotator cuff to a car's alignment and tires. If you constantly get flat/worn tires (injured rotator cuff, impingement, etc) and your alignment is off (scapular dyskinesis, improper positioning, etc), does it make sense to continue to just fix the flat tire (rotator cuff exercises) or does it make more sense to fix the alignment (scapular rehab/exercises)?

The rotator cuff's main role is to correctly hold the humeral head into the glenoid cavity/fossa. If the scapula is not sitting properly, the glenoid cavity will be out of position, causing the humeral head to not be positioned properly, causing excess stress on specific musculature and decreased space in areas that need space (subacromial space, etc).

11/23/10 3:03 AM
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nottheface
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If I put my arm in that position (back of had to wall) and I grip the deltoid with my left hand, the pain is in the crease behind the deltoid, right where my middle finger hits near the shoulder joint.
12/8/10 8:55 PM
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nottheface
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Finally getting a little better. Went to a chiropractor and they did some muscle work on my traps, deltoid and bicep. I still can't do standing military press, haven't tried bench but was able to do some push ups the other day with minimal pain. Chiro said I just strained it and it wasn't a torn rotator cuff but I think I'll start doing rotator exercises anyway. If anyone has some good suggestions, I'd love to hear them.
12/8/10 9:23 PM
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OneScoup
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DaveM - "That is where your rotator cuff goes into the shoulder."

This is not accurate. The rotator cuff is not a single muscle; it is a group of many muscles and does not "go into the shoulder" at any one specific point.

There are plenty of good rehab/pt rotator cuff exercises on youtube so just do a search. You'll notice a lot of overlap between the videos which is indicative of the more commonly prescribed exercises.

Realistically, once you've had a rotator cuff injury, you will always be highly susceptible to recurring injury in the future so it is VERY important to incorporate some of these exercises into your regular routine on a permanent basis. I always include a few of these exercises as part or my warm-up before lifting or training.


I never said it was one muscle.

It does go into the shoulder, go find a picture on-line. Although your post comes across so nitpicky that you may be debating what "shoulder" means. But the top front of the rotator cuff does go into the shoulder where he describes.

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