UnderGround Forums
 

Health & Medical UnderGround >> Continuous ITBs for 5 years...


2/10/11 6:12 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
HULC
63 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 2730
 
Well the title says it all. I picked it up about 4-5 years back when i was training to join the Royal Marines. It wasn't treated properly at the time - the Dr diagnosed it and referred me to a physio, but i spent over a year on the physio's waiting list and was then quietly removed.

It carried on flaring up whenever my activity levels went up, and sometimes for no appreciable reason, til about 2 years ago when i managed to arrange my own physio sessions. Then i was given a list of stretches that made the symptoms manageable when i was in pain, but never actually made the tightness go away. I was also given some exercises but they seemed to make my ITB hurt like fuck and tighten it up even more.

So here i am 5 years later. I do a few stretches that help after every run, but it's never really gone, and if i neglect the stretches it can creep up on me and ambush at unexpected times.

Is there anything more i can do or any other options i should be considering?
2/12/11 11:27 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
WidespreadPanic
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 12/29/06
Posts: 4274
This is totally off the wall, but I wonder if some kind of bo-tox injections might help?

As you know that stuff paralyzes the muscle so it can't contract. There's some talk of it being used in other types of muscle contraction problems. Might be worth discussing with your MD.

The problem is what is the 'root cause' of such things as Iliotibial band syndrome. I'm not sure we know.

Good luck!
2/13/11 12:58 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
blaznbison24
18 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 8/7/07
Posts: 708
Try a foam roller. It will hurt like crap but works wonders when my ITBS flares up.
2/13/11 10:39 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
MattB ATC
29 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/5/10
Posts: 400
Have you attempted any aggressive soft tissue work to the area? ART, Graston, ROLFing, etc? From my experiences, during chronic IT band issues, the IT band will commonly develop restrictions between the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris. With some proper, aggressive soft tissue work, those restrictions can be broken up and help with the release of the IT band.

Stretching is great, but isn't always the answer. You have to determine why the IT band is tight/restricted? Is it to compensate for a hip imbalance? For a knee imbalance or instability? Once you figure that out, then you can address those issues.
2/14/11 8:14 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
WidespreadPanic
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 12/29/06
Posts: 4303
 I tried deep massage, but MAN did that hurt. I spent 2 hours sweating and moaning and couldn't even open my eyes trying to deal with that (mostly good) pain. It did help a little but I tensed up again at the end. Did it twice and don't think I'll go for three, lol.
2/14/11 2:08 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
MattB ATC
29 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 02/14/11 2:16 PM
Member Since: 1/5/10
Posts: 401
What technique was used during the massage, what type of therapist did you see? Was each session two hours or was the combined time for the two sessions equal to two hours.

Even if each session was only an hour, IMO that is still too long, especially based off of your description of your pain levels during the sessions. I'd recommend finding a qualified Graston Technique practitioner who will do a screening of your hips and target the needed areas. You may want to request that they work on separation between the vastus lat/IT band and biceps femoris/IT Band junctures.

Where about do you live? I may be able to refer a good clinician.

Edit: To be clear, I'm not stating that the soft tissue work is the magic solution to the problem, but in my experience properly utilized soft tissue work has help tremendously in majority of the IT band cases I've worked on. It may be a beneficial option to consider in your and others cases.
2/14/11 2:14 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
MattB ATC
29 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 02/14/11 2:16 PM
Member Since: 1/5/10
Posts: 402
Double post
2/15/11 9:51 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
WidespreadPanic
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 02/15/11 9:51 AM
Member Since: 12/29/06
Posts: 4315
Matt,
It was called deep tissue massage (the guy also offers swedish massage). He said he lost track of time - I was in there for about 2 1/4 hours and the table was soaked when he was done. He did some kind of vibrating/pulsing hand held thing and also attached some kind of boot to my feet.

Funny story, I was moaning and groaning involuntarily and must have been pretty loud. My partner was sitting in the waiting room and some chick came in. The girl sat there for a while then turned to my friend and said in a panicked voice 'they're killing him, we have to go save him!' My friend laughed and said "I thought the same thing so I went and stood by the door and listened and heard them talking so I came back out and sat down". LOL. 
Thanks for the input!
2/15/11 11:38 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
MattB ATC
29 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/5/10
Posts: 405
WidespreadPanic,

That does sound like quite an interesting story. But to me it also just sounds like an inexperienced, overzealous practitioner as well. I just hope is doesn't turn you sour to the advantages that some properly applied soft tissue manipulation can provide you. But at least you have a good story out of the whole experience.
2/15/11 6:50 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
HULC
63 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 2748
MattB ATC - Have you attempted any aggressive soft tissue work to the area? ART, Graston, ROLFing, etc? From my experiences, during chronic IT band issues, the IT band will commonly develop restrictions between the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris. With some proper, aggressive soft tissue work, those restrictions can be broken up and help with the release of the IT band.

Stretching is great, but isn't always the answer. You have to determine why the IT band is tight/restricted? Is it to compensate for a hip imbalance? For a knee imbalance or instability? Once you figure that out, then you can address those issues.


I've tried using the foam roller on my ITB and had similar results to what i had with stretching - temporary relief, but it wouldn't stop it suddenly feeling tight and achy the next day. But it was only intermittant, and only for a couple of minutes at a time, so i wouldn't say it was aggressive. I've never had a deep tissue massage, but it is something i would definitely consider doing if it could be helpful.

Regarding the cause, the physio i was under had me perform a few tests, and he thought i was compensating to one side with my hips. The biggest indicator was a move he had me perform - raising 1 foot off the ground and then squatting slightly and returning to standing using 1 leg - which showed that when i raised my right foot and tried squatting my right hip would dip down, and then return to level when i stood again. My hips stayed level when i did the same move with my left foot off the ground. I don't know if this is helpful information to you?

I also partially tore the ligaments in my left ankle (the leg i have ITBs on) a few years before i had any trouble, and i've often wondered if this could have caused it as well.
2/15/11 6:54 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
HULC
63 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 2749
Widespread Panic,

I would try botox if i felt it would cure it. But i tend to stay away from pain killers in general, as i've always thought using painkillers to hide injuries is like shooting the messenger.
2/15/11 9:01 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
MattB ATC
29 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/5/10
Posts: 406
HULC,
Foam rolling is great, but when an issue continues on for an extended period of time I recommend a clinician applied aggressive soft tissue manipulation. Just make sure to do your research on the person. I personally would recommend finding somebody more than a licensed massage therapist who will do "deep tissue" work. Try to find an ART, Graston, or ROLFing practitioner, and one that is versed in sports medicine as well.

Also, your sprained ankle can directly be correlated to your IT Band syndrome. Research has shown that sprained ankles usually lead to a deficiency in glute activation and control in the same leg. Glute shuts down, other surrounding muscles take on the load, which includes the TFL that the IT Band attaches to. This may also be the reason you are having the problems keeping your right hip elevated during the single leg squat.

Personally, IMO, I would avoid the botox if I were you. The botox isn't a pain killer, but basically will partially paralyze the tissue to release some of the tension. But my concern is down the road if you need to regain some of that muscle tension you are screwed. And I feel that you are better off fixing the underlying issue. If you get the botox, you are just fixing the tight muscle, but not corrected the reason as to why you have the tight muscle.

Where abouts do you live? I may be able to refer you to a good therapist.
2/16/11 1:39 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
HULC
63 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 2751
Matt,

Thanks for taking the time to give this sort of advice, it's appreciated. Unfortunately i live in Jolly Olde England, so you probably wouldn't know any therapists over here. I've had a bit of a search on the net and found this guy who works in my area and seems to tick all the boxes -

http://www.embodyforyou.com/EB/?k=157072

What do you think?
2/16/11 3:45 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
MattB ATC
29 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/5/10
Posts: 407
The guy you posted looks fine, pretty basic practitioner.

I do know of one practitioner (he's an Osteomyologist) in the UK who I would definitely highly recommend. I beleive he is located in Nottingham. Is that anywhere close to you? If it is and you are interested in seeing him, I can get his contact information or get him to contact you.
2/18/11 8:34 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
HULC
63 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 2753
Nottingham is a few hundred miles away from me, so a bit out of range for a casual appointment. If you pass me his details i can look at getting in touch with him next time i'm up that way.
4/18/11 9:48 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
ThePigpen
3 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 12/1/03
Posts: 630
Hulc,
I've treated ITBS multiple times successfully with acupuncture and electro stim (I've also had it only bring temporary relief to two patients). If you can get over the fact that people think it's voodoo, acu is a great way to clear up pain and tension like that. It's worth a shot.

tp

Reply Post

You must log in to post a reply. Click here to login.