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LegalGround >> signing your name ESQ?


3/4/11 9:11 AM
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goku
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Edited: 03/04/11 9:12 AM
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ok, following up on my failed firm letterhead thread, i know there is no prohibition against this, but is it too big of a douchebag move to sign your name with ESQ on a non-legal letter?<br />

<br />Anyone done this before or is it just useless? this is a letter to get services for my special needs son btw....

the inspiration for this is a friend that signed his name MD, PHD for a similar letter and got services right away
3/4/11 12:45 PM
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ceiling_cat
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Why not? Its subtle, but gets the message across.
3/4/11 12:49 PM
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goku
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guess i dont want to piss people off or annoy them either, just let them know that I will destroy their lives if they try anything funny...
3/4/11 6:12 PM
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pm1964
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Edited: 03/04/11 6:13 PM
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I'd just use firm letterhead in that situation. If it was my son, they get the letter from the firm.

Edited - now that I have reread the original leterhead thread, I would simply go ask the senior partner what he thinks.
3/5/11 7:28 PM
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Cookie Monster
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ceiling_cat - Why not? Its subtle, but gets the message across.


This
3/6/11 3:51 PM
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Fake Pie
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Yeah why not? Btw, while you have to watch out for firm letterhead... you can always use your firm email and "forget" to delete the signature line. Hey, I was just using the email, I didn't really think about the implications...
3/6/11 4:45 PM
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goku
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really, is sending email with work sig the same as using letterhead? didnt know that one...
3/6/11 7:47 PM
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Fake Pie
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goku - really, is sending email with work sig the same as using letterhead? didnt know that one...


I am saying it is easier to explain if someone decides to use it against you. Vs. if you use firm letterhead you might get fucked if it ends up in the wrong hands.

You could always run a conflicts check and just add the matter as your client if you thought your section head or whatever would be cool with it.
3/7/11 9:00 AM
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Subadie
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what about on personal mail return address for a married couple. Wife is a Dr. So we could have Dr and Dr. Drs. (we are doctors by the way).
3/10/11 3:38 AM
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KenTheWalrus
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My experience is that most laypeople don't actually know what Esq. means. They understand it's "esquire" but they don't get the legal connection. Still, I know plenty of people who use Esq. on personal letterhead and business cards. I say it's fine.

I know a JD who insists that everyone call him "Dr. ______." He's a prick (not that there's any correlation).

3/21/11 10:14 AM
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HaMMerHouseFAN
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KenTheWalrus - 

My experience is that most laypeople don't actually know what Esq. means. They understand it's "esquire" but they don't get the legal connection. Still, I know plenty of people who use Esq. on personal letterhead and business cards. I say it's fine.

I know a JD who insists that everyone call him "Dr. ______." He's a prick (not that there's any correlation).

Is there something that says J.D.s can not be referred to as doctors?
 
3/21/11 3:56 PM
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KenTheWalrus
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No, but common practice is not to refer to yourself as a doctor.

I personally don't care if anyone does, I was just pointing out that I only know one attorney/J.D. holder who actually does that.

3/23/11 12:16 AM
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Xtina
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The majority of folks that I've known who use "Esq." have been douchebags.
4/5/11 12:40 PM
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Steve72
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Xtina - The majority of folks that I've known who use "Esq." have been douchebags.



The majority of folks that I've known who were lawyers have been douchebags.

(Present company excepted, of course).


-Doctor of Laws Steve72, Esq., DB.
7/28/11 4:42 PM
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StrictScrutiny
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KenTheWalrus - <p>My experience is that most laypeople don't actually know what Esq. means. They understand it's "esquire" but they don't get the legal connection. Still, I know plenty of people who use Esq. on personal letterhead and business cards. I say it's fine.

I know a JD who insists that everyone call him "Dr. ______." He's a prick (not that there's any correlation).</p>


I think a JD is a doctor just as much as a ph.D, chiropractor, or dentist.
7/28/11 4:56 PM
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ceiling_cat
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Theres a lawyer from my class on Facebook that refers to himself as Dr. Every time I see it I want to scratch his eyes out.

Here's a simple test for whether you should refer to yourself as a doctor. If someone were to stand up in a restaurant and in a panicked voice demand "is there a doctor in the house?!?" would you answer yes? If you can answer that guy your a doctor, if not shut the fuck up about your JD.
7/28/11 5:06 PM
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StrictScrutiny
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ceiling_cat - Theres a lawyer from my class on Facebook that refers to himself as Dr. Every time I see it I want to scratch his eyes out.

Here's a simple test for whether you should refer to yourself as a doctor. If someone were to stand up in a restaurant and in a panicked voice demand "is there a doctor in the house?!?" would you answer yes? If you can answer that guy your a doctor, if not shut the fuck up about your JD.


Agreed 100%. The only real doctors are the ones that save lives.
7/28/11 5:42 PM
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KenTheWalrus
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StrictScrutiny - I think a JD is a doctor just as much as a ph.D, chiropractor, or dentist.
StrictScrutiny - Agreed 100%. The only real doctors are the ones that save lives.

 



 Forgive me I'm easily confused. What?
7/28/11 6:43 PM
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Cookie Monster
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StrictScrutiny - 
ceiling_cat - Theres a lawyer from my class on Facebook that refers to himself as Dr. Every time I see it I want to scratch his eyes out.

Here's a simple test for whether you should refer to yourself as a doctor. If someone were to stand up in a restaurant and in a panicked voice demand "is there a doctor in the house?!?" would you answer yes? If you can answer that guy your a doctor, if not shut the fuck up about your JD.


Agreed 100%. The only real doctors are the ones that save lives.


I don't necessarily agree with this assessment, but I agree with the premise of the thread that lawyers aren't doctors.

As a lawyer, I have saved lives. Saved families. Saved people from ruin.
7/29/11 9:09 AM
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Subadie
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Can a doctor of podiatry call himself a doctor ?
7/29/11 9:11 AM
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Subadie
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Edited: 07/29/11 9:12 AM
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My wife is choking ! Is there a graduate from an accredited U.S. Medical School who is Board Certified in a Relevant Specialty and Licensed by this State to Practice Medicine, Or otherwise, a graduate from a foreign medical school that has also passed all of the steps of the USMLE, and subsequently been licensed by the State ? In the HOUSE ?!
7/30/11 12:32 AM
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StrictScrutiny
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KenTheWalrus - 
StrictScrutiny - I think a JD is a doctor just as much as a ph.D, chiropractor, or dentist.
<span id="userPost35304711" class="User-260540">
StrictScrutiny - Agreed 100%. The only real doctors are the ones that save lives.
<p> </p>
</span>

 Forgive me I'm easily confused. What?


What I was trying to say is that I realize a JD is a doctorate degree, but it is somewhat silly to refer to a JD as "doctor." I don't consider a dentist, chiropractor, or a Ph.D doctors either. I call my dentist, chiropractor, and college professors I meet by their first name.
8/12/11 4:10 PM
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Trust
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 In my first year legal writing class for one of the first assignments we had to pretend we were lawyers and writing some memo or letter.  We were to sign our own name to this.   A large number of students signed by putting "Esq." after their name.  I was not one of them as I simply didn't know about it. 

You want to what is more douchebaggy than signing your name "Esq." for everything?

The teacher YELLED at the class, and threatened to "turn in" all those students who signed with "Esq." to the state bar for the unlicensed practice of law and holding themselves out as licensed attorneys.  And she was very serious.  She was actually threatening to call the state bar on students who signed their name with "Esq." in a homework assignment for a legal writing class for the unlicensed practice of law. 

Now, this was an evening section, and most of the students were older and already in some career, and we just kind of looked at each other like "WTF?  It's a homework assignment, loady, chill out."   Maybe that works with regular 1Ls, but we all recognized how petty and psychotic that was. 
8/12/11 5:15 PM
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Subadie
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She does not seem too smart. The state bar only has authority over lawyers ! She would have to go to the State AG.
8/12/11 5:23 PM
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Steve72
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ArthurFonzerill - Annonymous, Esq complaint should have been sent to the dean



Fixed.

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