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Scott Sonnon >> Shelby County Sheriff Academy


1/26/02 12:00 AM
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Mike Gillette
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Edited: 26-Jan-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-02
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TTT
1/28/02 7:22 PM
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sundevil
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Edited: 28-Jan-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-02
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But although the firemen who died in the Trade Center bravely fought the flames and led the evacuation, they did so as workers doing the best they could in their jobs - people trained by the city to rush into buildings and save others. Firefighters chose a very worthy line of work, but to die while doing it isn't completely different from, say, the computer programmers who stayed in the Trade Center and perished while desperately trying to preserve the data backing people's financial portfolios. Just after Christmas, a New Bedford policeman carried a woman out of a burning building. ``I'm not a hero,'' he said upon emerging outside. ``I'm just a worker.'' While I applaud the modesty of the policeman, especially since it is so rare in our society, the rest of this quote makes no sense. Apparently the writer thinks it would be heroic for a passerby to rush into the towers to save people at great personal risk (and it would be, of course), but it is not heroic for a firefighter or police officer to do so because it is their job?!? So the people who risk their life once with no thought of pay are more heroic than the people who take a job that will never make them anything more than middle-class members of society, but requires them to risk their lives many times throughout their careers? Where is the logic in that. I guess all the winners of the Congressional Medal of Honor aren't heroes either, because they were all being paid to do a job. The sad part is that this writer will probably consider himself a hero for taking an unpopular stance when others point out how ridiculous he is.
1/28/02 9:30 PM
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jrichardson
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Edited: 28-Jan-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-02
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LOL at "renovated pimp-slapping!!" I guess that'd be one of the eight upcoming video projects. . . Anyway, I think this guy started out with a good point -- that being a victim does not make you a hero. However. This guy is obviously one of the many people that assume that it's someone else's job to protect him from bad stuff. There is no shortage of people that share this idea in this country. The obvious cognitive dissonance of the thought that his OWN life is worth someone else's, but the fire fighter's life is only worth his salary, is something that is VERY UNLIKELY to enter Mr. Thompson's head -- for the very reason that it would force him to confront the too-scary idea -- one reinforced by working in news media, where he's exposed to stories about people NOT being saved by heroes all the time -- that he can't count on a hero saving him when he needs it. So to protect his own psyche from the horrible thought that he's not safe from harm, he latches on to the very words of the heroes -- "Just doing my job" -- and feels safe in a world where there are lots of people who's "job" it is to lay their lives on the line to save his. OF COURSE heroes say they're "just doing their job!" If they HADN'T done what they FELT THEY HAD TO, they wouldn't be heroes! Heroes can only be truly percieved by other people, watching from the outside. Likewise cowards, now that I think about it -- so in all honesty, Mr. Thompson can't be faulted for not thinking himself a coward. Because "I did what I had to" and "Just doing my job" blinds the coward to his own true nature, as well the hero. Of course there are heroes who realize that what they did was dangerous and could have killed them and that they had the choice not to do it -- that's when the shakes and nightmares start. . . If Scott ever did hand Nicholas Thompson a well-needed whupping, ol' Nick would probably believe that a simple 911 cellphone call would cause a policeman to magically appear and take the beating in his place. . . y'know, 'cause that's their job and all. Anway, enough philosopsychology and memeteering, I have to go train!
1/30/02 3:27 PM
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jrichardson
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Edited: 30-Jan-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-02
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"Law Enforcement and Emergency Rescue Personnel alike... are heroic by definitive vocation." I agree. The point I was trying to get across was, that in one view the vocation is raised to the level of heroism; that to do such a job is innately heroic. Nicholas Thompson's view is that such heroism is lowered to the level of a mere vocation; that a job is a job, and they're "just doing it." In any case, those ideas are like a good twin/evil twin; they can't both exist in the same head, and one cannot supplant the other without a desperate fight.
1/29/02 4:40 PM
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socal
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Edited: 29-Jan-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-02
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LOL - renovated pimp slap ;-) Good post Scott (the first one). Joe

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