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Scott Sonnon >> Dizziness and Fisticuffs Exerc. ??

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1/30/02 8:22 PM
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jrichardson
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Edited: 30-Jan-02
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Someone I know gets vomit-level seasick if she does a somersault or spins while standing. But she can lie on the ground and roll longways without any problem. Some people just have weird inner-ear sensitivity. But if the problem seems to be an eyesight thing, perhaps you're picking up on focus changes through the glasses or contacts, which generally don't have a consistent focal length in your peripheral vision. That could trick your brain into "seeing" that the room's moving around. Try also without glasses or contacts (the quick-n-easy route to "diffused vision :) ).
1/30/02 4:55 PM
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Ausgepicht
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Edited: 30-Jan-02
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David: Thanks a ton for the help! However...I go VERY slow and always have my eyes open!! I tried your suggestion of fixing my gaze on one spot and the dizziness has dropped substantially. I wonder if it's an eye 'thing'??? I wear contacts/glasses. Again, thanks!!! Joe
1/29/02 7:46 PM
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Ausgepicht
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Edited: 29-Jan-02
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Scott: I have been working on the exercises on Prime Your Bioenergy and on one particular exercise I am getting SERIOUSLY dizzy after just a few seconds. It is the chin infinity. After about 4-5 of 'em I have to stop. My question is...have you heard of this before?? Do you think this is normal and just part of the recovery phase that you mention? Thanks in advance! Joe
1/29/02 8:08 PM
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djl
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Edited: 29-Jan-02
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Joe, I'm gonna jump in and make two suggestions: 1) Go SLOWLY 2) Keep your eyes open Play with the speed, but keep it VERY SLOW at first. Developing suppleness in a range of motion does NOT come from the 'ole "Faster, Harder, Stronger!", but rather "Slower, Smoother, Calmer". Next, experiment with fixing your eyes on one spot as you do the exercise. Then, play with diffused vision. Moving eye-sight. And finally eyes closed (only once you no longer feel dizzy with them open.) Fluidity comes from "letting-go", and then "co-ordinating" your natural attributes. It's what's in your way and what you force that stops you, not what you haven't achieved. Be well, stay aware, & train smart, David Lepp ROSS IDP
2/1/02 10:10 AM
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djl
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Edited: 01-Feb-02
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Joe, Another way to qualify if it's vision related, would be experiment with axis/equilibrium exercises. This entails testing various head & torso positions (axis as realated to the plane of the earth) with your eyes closed, then open. For instance, walk extrememly slow, as if thru thick mud. (Step mechanics:step with the heel, ridge of your foot, small toe - rolling up to your big toe, at which point the whole foot is on the ground gripping with the toes. - I've explained this so that your step doesn't become an inhibiting factor in the test). Try this walk with your eyes open, then with them closed. Next, try the same exercise with your head tilted to one side. You'll notice a loss of your "sense of horizon". When you execute the exercise with your head titled, it will most likely be difficult both with eyes open and closed. This is quite common. However, if you find a DRASTIC change in your balancing between eyes open & closed, when you do this exercise with your head strait - it may very well be vision related as John mentioned above. If not, don't worry about. As you just mentioned, you find no disturbance when rolling, tumbling, etc. Remember, this neck exercise was originally developed to increase range of motion and hone attributes related to function & movement in a dynamic sphere. Make sure that your training is Appropriate, Specific, and Applicable (ASA) to your training goals. In other words, if after trying all the above, you feel no imporvement, but it's not hindering your performance goals, bag the exercise. Hope this helps! Be well, stay aware, & train SMART. djl
1/31/02 5:25 PM
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Ausgepicht
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Edited: 31-Jan-02
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Hmmmm.. I can do as your friend does no problem also. I can leg thread, somersault, etc. up and down the gym no problem...I mean NOT the slightest dizziness, but if I'm standing moving just my head, forgetaboutit. I'm going to play around with your sugesstion of no glasses/contacts. Thanks! Joe
2/3/02 11:49 AM
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ciegr
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Edited: 03-Feb-02
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I do not specifically know the exercise to which you are referring. A description of this technique could provide valuable insight into the mechanism of 'dizziness.' When you mention dizziness, do you mean light headedness or the sensation that you or the room is spinning (vertigo)? These are generally due to two different mechanisms. In either case, this is extremely unlikely to be due to changes in the ability to focus the eyes or an inner ear mechanism. Changes in coordination with the eyes open or closed and 'dizziness' when moving the neck is very suggestive of a problem in a central area of the nervous system called the cerebellum. This area is closely related to the inner ear. The organ that senses changes in head position within the inner ear fires centrally to this structure (the cerebellum) as does information from other parts of the body so that it may coordinate movement among other things. This area will fire upward to coordinate eye movements and downward to coordinate postural musculature and stabilization. This is important because when you move your head or body then your eyes move reflexively to maintain a visual axis. You can see this yourself by looking in the mirror and tilting your head to either side. You should notice a rotation of the eyes in a direction opposite of your head tilt. This is especially easy to see after a night of heavy drinking with bloodshot eyes. Other tests of how well this area is functioning is to stand with your feet together with your eyes closed. In this position you should be stable and without sway. Also all the 'drunk' tests that a police officer may ask you to perform (alcohol effects the cerebellum). These include standing with eyes closed and feet together and performing a rapid finger to nose movement on each side. You should be able to do this equally on both sides and touch the finger to nose without missing. You may also test this with a thigh slapping test. In a sitting position with eyes open very rapidliy slap the front then back of your hand on your thigh many times on each side individually. The rate and rhythm should be the same on both sides. If you have problems here then, among other problems, you lose some of your ability to coordinate body and eye musculature. When you lose precise coordination of eye movements then you may get the sensation that you or the room is spinning. Congratulations on making it to the bottom of my post. ciegr

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