UnderGround Forums
 

Scott Sonnon >> The "Method 2" Push-up


2/5/02 5:33 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
XJD
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 05-Feb-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 0
 
Around 2 years ago, while training in Brazilian jiu-jitsu, I purchased the Grappler's Toolbox 1.1 and started incorporating some of the exercises into my training. I tried to pick the exercises that used movement patterns that would be most valuable to me, such as the squat series, leg threading and the shin box movements. I noticed shortly after that my ground movement and fluidity greatly improved. There were some exercises on the tapes, though, that didn't look like they had any use for me. Specifically, the push-ups using a screwing motion of the arms looked really useless. I figured there wasn't much use for pushing myself up like that in a grappling match, and what ever benefit I got from it wouldn't be worth the trouble. About 9 months ago I started attending Scott's classes in the Seattle area. I had recently been training in judo, had done well in my first tournament, and I told Scott I would like to focus my training in that direction. In the second week of training with Scott, we started playing "jacket fencing," which is like judo or sambo but with fewer rules. At some point, Scott turned on what seemed to me like super-strength. Although I rarely try to muscle my way through my martial arts training, I believe I am strong for my size. No matter how tried to move Scott, I couldn't budge him at all; not even an inch. At first I concluded that Scott's strength was due to joint strength. Later, Scott explained that it was his use of structural strength that made the difference. For those who are not familiar with ROSS, the cornerstone of ROSS training is the development and integration of efficient structure, movement, and breathing. I didn't think much more about Scott's explanation at the time, but nine months later, I understand! I've seen, through my development, how many of the balancing exercises Scott has shown me improve "structural strength" in static positions and, to a limited extent, in dynamic movements. Which leads back to the "method 2" push-up--this exercise is for developing "structural strength" in movement! I realize that this may be obvious to many, but it came as a great revelation to me. Also, though I've been overlooked the value of some of the ROSS exercises before, I'm continually surprised at how much there is to them than meets the eye.
2/5/02 8:18 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
socal
1 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 05-Feb-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 0
cool post
2/5/02 9:32 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
tysaw
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 05-Feb-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 0
xjd, interesting observation. I had similiar experiences with the GTB material. To this day I discover new insights into the uses of many of the exercises I first dismissed. I can see how some people might initially not like or see the utility of the GTB for bjj, but if you stick with it and experiment it does eventually fall into place. I use the screwing motion of the push ups to keep people from achieving side control when they attempt to pass. Sometimes it takes a while to get your hips out/legs in and you have to support their driving weight for a time. Instead of muscling it, I found that little detail of the pushup movement lets me support their weight almost indefinitely. My arms would tire if I didn't use structure and efficiency. The GTB has helped my bjj a lot...particularly because I train solo a lot outside of class, no one to roll with usually :( I envy you having the chance to train with Scott, there is SO MUCH I'd like to learn from him but living here in Maine he couldn't be any farther away than WA state! Drats!
2/6/02 6:00 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
KENWINGJITSU
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 06-Feb-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 0
damn tysaw...I....I...I...I came up with the same thing. I've been working on bottom escapes more, & this was something I just started doing too. Sort of bracing him, while you shrimp out & get your legs over to re-position guard.
2/6/02 10:15 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
tysaw
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 06-Feb-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 0
Kenwingjitsu, cool! My training partners and I have been really drilling hard the aspect of keeping/recovering the guard. I have been using the space I create with hip movement, bracing as above with either leg threading (going to knees) or if I want to recover the guard I use the "breakdance" move?!? to plant a foot into my oppt's hip and get space to recover the guard. For fun, sometimes I will plant my foot on the hip as above and spin using the neck roll (forward roll where you roll across your shoulders/neck to opposite side). I don't think I was very clear in my descrpt. above but the point is I use a LOT of the mat navigation movements in real time, against real resistance and they work well. I have been emphasizing the concept of minimum effort/maximum effect lately and the GTB helps with that. I also have been really paying attention to my breathing and trying to ingrain calmness when I get into certain positions that give me problems. I exhale, say to myself "no big deal, this is going to be fun getting out of here" and then I work my escape methodically. For example, I used to get almost in a panic if I was winded and then got caught in a TIGHT north/south position. I dreaded it! I would feel like I was being suffocated. What I did to work it is have the biggest, strongest guys get me there and just hold it while I breathed and just relaxed. Next, I would sprint the stairs and go to the same position and repeat the drill while I was really winded! Then I worked all the escapes, drilled with a lot of reps. Finally, I would run the stairs, have the guys really sink the pin and put all the above together. It was like a progressive desensitzing experience. Now I welcome that pin because I take it as a personal challenge! The shift from dread to mobilzing my get challenged mindset really worked for me. I am doing this now with back escapes and choke defenses. I got the idea a couple of years ago when I asked Scott advice on escaping side control (for a tournament I was training for). He advised me to exhale 1-2x and repeat to myself, "I am handling this". It worked! :-)
2/7/02 10:47 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
tysaw
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 07-Feb-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 0
yep, that's the one. I just used it several times tonight while rolling from half guard. I use my forearm to brace the armpit, underhook the leg to be kneebarred with my other hand, then helicopter my free leg over/around to take the knee bar. Did that make any sense? Also, tonigh I used a half guard position from the bottom where one arm hugs the waist and the other arm underhooks the leg (your head is planted in the oppt.'s belly). Rodrigo Medeiros showed me a bunch of attacks from here. He emphasized being on your side and basing on your elbow (the one underhooking the leg). I kind of had trouble maintaining this position until I realized that it is a shin box with the legs, this immediately opened doors to how I could move to the connecting positions. Simple, not rocket science, but a revelation to me nonetheless. It made something click and I was able to sweep and control from there at will without fear of being pinned. :-) It's a great day when you learn/relearn or realize something new.
2/7/02 4:15 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
KENWINGJITSU
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 07-Feb-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 0
Dang!!!! Awesome bro. I used to hate Sidemount & North South also. I have oly been practicing escapes latetly cos my top game is pretty damn good if I mmay say so, but on the rare occasion I get stuck on the bottom, I'm like a deflated ballon, so I put everything else on the back burner & have been working on getting comfy on the bottom & escape combos. The GTB does what you say...minimum effort. I love it the most & I try to do it a few times a week. p.s....by 'breakdance move', do you mean the 'windmill/helicopter' thingy to swing your leg over to guard?
2/7/02 12:54 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
sovann
1 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 07-Feb-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 0
Wow!

Reply Post

You must log in to post a reply. Click here to login.