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Hunting & Fishing Ground >> new hunter questions


10/17/11 12:53 PM
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Chris
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 So I am just getting into hunting. Been a fisherman my entire lift.

In Massachusetts we can only hunt deer with a bow or shotgun.

I will probably hunt deer, turkey, and migratory birds.

Any thoughts on 1st shotgun I should look to buy?
10/17/11 3:53 PM
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Blue Duck
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Remington 870. Quality shotgun, good price and versatile. It'll come with three interchangeable chokes that will let you hunt all of the game you listed.
10/18/11 9:28 AM
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Chris
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 awesome. thanks for the advice.
10/18/11 12:01 PM
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wheeels
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Rem 870 or Mossberg 500

pretty much the standard for inexpensive, reliable shotguns.
10/19/11 1:32 PM
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Chris
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Ttt Phone Post
10/22/11 11:29 PM
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PeterIrl
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How come you can't use rifles for deer in Mass?
10/24/11 11:44 AM
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Chris
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 ended up with a Mossberg 535. I figure I'd start with something reliable, but inexpensive and if I get real serious I can always buy something pricier.

Peterlrl. I'm not sure the reason behind it, but hunting with a rifle is not permitted for most game species in Mass, including deer.
10/26/11 8:11 AM
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MachetePhil
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 cool. I'm not a fan of Mossberg's myself but it should make a decnet first gun.

just an fyi if you plan on using buckshot for deer with it.  I had a Mossberg, can't remember what model, I thought it was 835, it was something 35 anyway.  That thing couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with 00 buckshot, but with #1 buck it was pretty lethal. 

I'd take it to a range if I were you and try some different shells at different ranges to see what it does. Also, just my personal opinion, but if it shoots 3 1/2" shells I'd stick with 2 3/4 or 3". Unless you're happy with 3 1/2 at the range,  but I've read a lot of negative stuff about the ballisics of 3 1/2" shells and I've never seen where they shoot any better at all.  

good luck. 
11/2/11 3:15 PM
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alvo69
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 No rifle is a population density and NIMBY issue. oh yeah, political as well. Congrats to hunting for your own food. Wild turkey hunting is a blast, but often frustrating. ALWAYS remember these rules of gun safety.  taken from a site I get an e-mail from daily ----  www.thetacticalwire.com/   ----and another EXTENSIVE list on this site:    www.savetheguns.com/safety_rules.htm= pay SPECIAL attention to hunting and CLIMBING over fences/ obstacles. BEST OF LUCK and SAFETY in the fields and woods of this beautiful country Chris. ====================================================================================  Primary Safety Rules

* In a tradition that was probably started by Jeff Cooper, most defensive firearms instructors teach some version of the first four rules for handling and operating firearms:

1. All guns are always loaded.

• Probably more people who have been shot unintentionally were shot with "unloaded" firearms than with any other kind.

2. Don't let the muzzle of the gun cross anything you're not prepared to shoot.

• At conventional handgun ranges, if your gun isn't pointed at a person or object, you can't shoot that person or object.

• Keep in mind that if the gun is pointed at an upward angle and it discharges, the bullet may travel a very long distance and strike a person or object you may not even see.

• Similarly, many walls may not stop bullets, so rounds fired at walls may penetrate and strike a person or object on the other side.

3. Keep your finger out of the trigger guard, up on the frame of the gun, until the sights are on target and you're prepared to shoot.

• Tradition places this rule as rule three; if I were starting fresh, I think I'd make it rule one.

• Firearms do not discharge on their own. If, in the heat of battle or in total brain fade, you inadvertently point a firearm at someone you don't intend to shoot, they can't get shot if your finger is not inside the trigger guard.

• Most guns are designed to be fired by a finger on a trigger. They are more natural to grasp that way, so the finger tends to drift there under stress. While a single-action pistol would seem more vulnerable to rule three violations, American police officers racked up countless unintended discharges in decades of using double-action revolvers, so it is essential to follow rule three regardless of the type of gun you're handling.

4. Always be sure of your target and what's beyond it.

• The first part of this rule is absolute: you must always identify your target.

• The second part of this rule is relative: in a sporting or training environment there is no justification for not knowing what is beyond your target. In a deadly encounter you may be forced to fire in circumstances where you may not even be able to see what is beyond your target. All the more reason to select ammunition which is not likely to exit its original target.

5. Maintain control of your gun.

• Attorneys Michael Anthony and Robert Brown have researched civil litigation involving firearms and found that most successful lawsuits against gun owners involve incidents where someone other than the owner has accessed and misused the gun.

• As a result, I have accepted their suggestion and now teach this fifth basic rule of firearms safety.

• Make sure that you keep the gun within your control when you carry it. Guns in purses and other means of off-body carry are difficult to control, as are guns being shown to friends, stashed between couch cushions, placed in desk drawers, etc.

• When you must store a gun that you are not carrying, take reasonable steps to limit access by unauthorized users. If you must simply disable it with a lock, a cable lock is preferable to a trigger lock - most trigger locks violate Rule Three.

• A caveat to this rule concerns dropped guns. Modern handguns are designed not to fire when dropped and people have shot themselves trying to catch guns that have slipped from their hands. If you do momentarily lose control of a firearm, let it fall to the ground.


Because we do actually unload firearms and also place them out of our immediate control from time to time, a corollary of Rule One and Rule Five, the condition check, is also worth learning:

Whenever you pick up a firearm that has been out of your control, even if only for an instant, open the action to determine that it is in the condition in which you want it, loaded or unloaded.

A "click" when you expect a "bang!" can be as deadly as a "bang!" when you expect a "click."
11/8/11 5:08 PM
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MichaelVronsky
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i started hunting 2 years ago and bought myself a 535 with the 3 barrels and love it. good choice.
11/10/11 9:38 PM
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drmccarty
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Chris -  ended up with a Mossberg 535. I figure I'd start with something reliable, but inexpensive and if I get real serious I can always buy something pricier.

Peterlrl. I'm not sure the reason behind it, but hunting with a rifle is not permitted for most game species in Mass, including deer.


Yeah I'm looking into getting a 535 also i found a website www.cheaperthandirt.com that sells anything hunter related and they have a mossberg 535 for 288.29 and a remington 870 express super magnum for 359.03 they seem to have pretty good deals from what I've seen so far
11/22/11 12:13 PM
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Fade The Public
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MachetePhil -  cool. I'm not a fan of Mossberg's myself but it should make a decnet first gun.

just an fyi if you plan on using buckshot for deer with it.  I had a Mossberg, can't remember what model, I thought it was 835, it was something 35 anyway.  That thing couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with 00 buckshot, but with #1 buck it was pretty lethal. 

I'd take it to a range if I were you and try some different shells at different ranges to see what it does. Also, just my personal opinion, but if it shoots 3 1/2" shells I'd stick with 2 3/4 or 3". Unless you're happy with 3 1/2 at the range,  but I've read a lot of negative stuff about the ballisics of 3 1/2" shells and I've never seen where they shoot any better at all.  

good luck. 


Who uses buckshot nowadays?

A modern shotgun with a riffled barrel and decent sabot slugs are just as accurate as a riffle.

I have an H&R single shot 20 gauge with a riffled barrel and shooting Remington premier coppersolid sabot's I'm fine with shooting past 100yds.
11/22/11 4:09 PM
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MachetePhil
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 Who uses buckshot nowadays?

A modern shotgun with a riffled barrel and decent sabot slugs are just as accurate as a riffle.

I have an H&R single shot 20 gauge with a riffled barrel and shooting Remington premier coppersolid sabot's I'm fine with shooting past 100yds.

True, buckshot is pretty much going away for most hunters, but in a lot of places, especially in the south, people still use it and probably always will.  Where they run dogs, or where the cover's so thick you can't really shoot more than a fifty yards in most places and most of the shots are at moving deer. 

Honestly I don't know why I even brought it up in the other post, other than when he said he got a mossberg it made me think of that gun that I had.  And yeah, I used a lot of buckshot back then, but now I almost never do.  I agree 100% about modern slug guns being as good as a rifle well out beyond 100yds. 

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