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HolyGround >> Quaker anarchists?


10/22/11 12:08 PM
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JesusTapped
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A good friend of mine is a Quaker who is also a self-described anarchist. I've noticed an increase in the adoption of the term "anarchist" within religious/spiritual circles and I'm hoping for an explanation of why this concept seems to be taking hold.

My friend is a political activist whose cause, I often joke, is having a cause. He also fancies himself a radical, which might help to explain his affinity for the anarchist tag. But I've seen other religious anarchists describe themselves as such on the HG so, please, educate me. My friend isn't very articulate (sorry Anthony!). Phone Post
10/22/11 12:20 PM
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Lahi
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Edited: 10/22/11 12:23 PM
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I consider myself a Christian Anarchist. I don't think I'd be much help as to why its getting to be a more popular label. I'd never thought about that to be honest.

It helps me make the most sense of the Gospels and the early church. There are some more structured denominations that I feel close to as well, but Christian Anarchy is where I feel called, and where I'm at right now if I am honest with myself.

The idea of not having an established power structure that is dogmatically imposed is something I believe in. I know it works in some places, and I'm not saying God doesn't use churches with these kinds of hierarchies, but I think there is a lot of potential for harm there too. Of course we're never going to get it right, but I think genuine community (of any kind) needs to be moving away from the idea of people "being in charge" just because they have a title, and not because they are trusted, accountable members of a community. This seems to me consistent with the NT Church, where leadership had a very different meaning that what it often does today, and where the community was more of a body, instead of a bunch of people governed by a distant and separate organization.

If you look up "Christian Anarchism" on Wiki, they have a pretty good article on it.
11/2/11 11:23 AM
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reverend john
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quaker church has always been anarchic, they do not have hierarchy, they make all decisions based on consensus and in their meetings they sit in silence until someone feels they are lead to share something.

They have also been anti government, highly critical of any combination of church and state, and always been non violent peace activists.

The growth in popularity in the Christian anarchy movement has to do with a number of things, but I would say one strong one is the realization that current traditional church belief and structure is failing in most of the world, in both scandal and efficiency. I think the acceptance of a post modern philosophy also causes people to deconstruct the old institutions and in doing so they find a fresh expression of Christianity outside of the traditional church.

rev
11/2/11 7:16 PM
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Malvert the Janitor
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reverend john - quaker church has always been anarchic, they do not have hierarchy, they make all decisions based on consensus and in their meetings they sit in silence until someone feels they are lead to share something.

They have also been anti government, highly critical of any combination of church and state, and always been non violent peace activists.

The growth in popularity in the Christian anarchy movement has to do with a number of things, but I would say one strong one is the realization that current traditional church belief and structure is failing in most of the world, in both scandal and efficiency. I think the acceptance of a post modern philosophy also causes people to deconstruct the old institutions and in doing so they find a fresh expression of Christianity outside of the traditional church.

rev
Thanks rev.

He told me about the silent meetings. He almost describes it as more of a political organization than a religious group...which makes more sense after reading your post. Phone Post
11/2/11 7:46 PM
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reverend john
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if you begin to look at the gospels within their socio political and economic context Jesus was not just a religious leader but a radical that confronted all of life.

rev
11/4/11 1:47 AM
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yusul
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JesusTapped - A good friend of mine is a Quaker who is also a self-described anarchist. I've noticed an increase in the adoption of the term "anarchist" within religious/spiritual circles and I'm hoping for an explanation of why this concept seems to be taking hold. <br><br>My friend is a political activist whose cause, I often joke, is having a cause. He also fancies himself a radical, which might help to explain his affinity for the anarchist tag. But I've seen other religious anarchists describe themselves as such on the HG so, please, educate me. My friend isn't very articulate (sorry Anthony!). <img src="/images/phone/apple.png" alt="Phone Post" border="0" style="vertical-align:middle;"/>


While I agree that it's an appropriate term in a worldly sense, no christian is really an anarchist if they believe in the second coming with God as the ruler.
11/11/11 6:19 PM
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ocianain
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Quakers are insane, they believe God gives the new revelations daily. They know this because they get a warm feeling in their belly. Armed with this new revelation they feel compelled to shape the world in their image.
11/14/11 1:37 AM
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reverend john
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yusul - 
JesusTapped - A good friend of mine is a Quaker who is also a self-described anarchist. I've noticed an increase in the adoption of the term "anarchist" within religious/spiritual circles and I'm hoping for an explanation of why this concept seems to be taking hold.

My friend is a political activist whose cause, I often joke, is having a cause. He also fancies himself a radical, which might help to explain his affinity for the anarchist tag. But I've seen other religious anarchists describe themselves as such on the HG so, please, educate me. My friend isn't very articulate (sorry Anthony!). Phone Post


While I agree that it's an appropriate term in a worldly sense, no christian is really an anarchist if they believe in the second coming with God as the ruler.


Depends upon how God rules, does God rule by force or by empowering us? The king is a different kind of king that those of mankind, the King rules by love not force, which can be considered anarchy in my opinion.

Anarchy does not say no leadership, but says no oppression.

rev
1/20/12 8:35 PM
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BigSherm
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ocianain - Quakers are insane, they believe God gives the new revelations daily. They know this because they get a warm feeling in their belly. Armed with this new revelation they feel compelled to shape the world in their image.

 which Quakers are you talking about? there are over 20 different groups of Quakers. I myself was an Evangelical Friend for a bit, I will assume you are talking about the Society Of Friends
1/21/12 2:09 AM
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yusul
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is there a quicker non wiki explanation of the differences between the groups?

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