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Judo/Sambo UnderGround >> Taking up Judo at 30+


10/23/11 11:04 PM
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snowman95
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Hey Judo peeps

I've been doing BJJ for a while, to be honest kinda burnt out on it, havent trained for probably 6 months, (injuries/no motivation)

Have been thinking about taking up Judo, just wondering if anyone here started Judo a little later (late 20's / 30+) and any tips to avoid injuries etc / experiences?

Cheers
10/23/11 11:33 PM
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rhsil
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Ttt Phone Post
10/24/11 1:52 AM
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Spartan79
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Started two years ago. I'm 32, won't lie it hurts but well worth it! Phone Post
10/24/11 5:42 AM
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judoblackbelt
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I started judo around 42 years old meeting graplers thru a BJJ seminar by Relson Gracie I think in 1992-93 time frame. Their was a judo BB pinning everyone and I asked him what his belt was in and where to learn judo. From their and 19 years later I am still practicing judo. I had my competitive years in Judo/BJJ up to age 56 and then retired from competiion. Avoid injuries? My best advice is learn proper throwing mechanics and technique. This will avoid injuries from repetitive motion like shoulders/elbows/wrist and knees. Learn how to receive a throw thru proper breakfalls. Practice throws on crash pads to avoid injuries when you are first starting out. Mat work is relatively safe if you avoid chokes and armbars, pins only. Having a flexible body will help avoid injuries also. Need a 1-2 day week away from judo to strengthen your body to handle the rigors of judo.
10/24/11 7:23 AM
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snowman95
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Thanks JBB

(now I feel like a little whinger! hah) I'm used (was) used to chokes and armbars just the falls was the main thing, read alot about shoulders etc, but correct technique ftw as they say
10/24/11 1:19 PM
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WISEGUY66
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I started when I was 34. The best advice I received is don't be afraid to fall in randori. Most people that I see get hurt it usually happens when they are trying not to get thrown.
10/24/11 2:28 PM
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cdueck
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Until you are sure of what is happening don't fight the throw to much and once the throw is started accept the fall. I am going to be starting back at judo in the new year at 38, I really don't expect any injuries but I know I will surely be sore. 
10/25/11 7:32 PM
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SiuHung
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Started Judo at 34. Am now 41 and do BJJ 2-3 hours/week and Judo 3 hours/week without fail. It can be rough. Learn ukemi. Learn to relax and enjoy it all. Laugh and smile as you're thrown or pinned. Have no illusions about being a world champion.
10/25/11 8:48 PM
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snowman95
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Oh there are no illusions, just want to keep fit and learn some skills and have some fun Phone Post
10/26/11 7:01 AM
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judoblackbelt
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Yes, have fun in judo. When I see the BJJers coming to judo I see the seriousness on their faces and tell them to learn how to throw and receive throws and have fun. The other newbies are scared of judo a little. So theirs is boosting confidence so they stick with it. The BJJers are gamers and will stick with it no matter what, proven warriors.
10/26/11 2:18 PM
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Spartan79
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^ lol u married too a bjjer ;-) Phone Post
10/27/11 6:39 AM
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judoblackbelt
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married to a yoginy( if that is the correct spelling). I coached one of buddies judo students(BJJer) in his first judo tournament and the young man fought 9 fights. went 3-2 in white/green belt, 0-2 in brown(his choice) and 0-2 in team ( fought a brown and black belt).
10/27/11 9:52 AM
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Spartan79
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Cool. Was only joking bud ;-) Phone Post
11/6/11 4:24 AM
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MojoJojo
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I started Judo at 31, 1 1/2 years ago. After a few years doing BJJ. Really liking it so far.

Definitely still worrying too much about being thrown, not from a competitive point of view though, dont care about that. I am trying to work on not being such a pussy! :)

I find it really hard to implement any of my few throws in randori, so I tend to end up very defensive most of the time. But then again, I think of when I first started out with BJJ, getting PWNED all the time and not knowing how to attack, guess it is the same way and it will eventually get better. It can be frustrating, but it is part of the journey I guess.


11/6/11 6:20 AM
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judoblackbelt
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That is why judo is so much harder than BJJ to get good at. It takes time to learn to throw with a resisting partner. Most of the judo world class players have been training judo since they were kids. NO phenoms so to speak like you get in BJJ from a few years practice coupled with athetic skills and maybe a wrestling/football background. That is why you see so many kids/young adults doing BJJ in the US than judo,easier to progress. Another is the number of young BJJ blackbelts who are teaching in the US. Most of us judo BB are too old to provide the training and fighting skills necessary to develope a hugh program that will pay for itself. So we are community based program thru a YMCA for example.
11/7/11 12:17 AM
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snowman95
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Couple of lessons in

Most important things I've learned so far:

Work harder on breakfalls and don't partner up with the kid with one arm, he can't hang onto the sleeve to lessen any throws
11/7/11 6:01 AM
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judoblackbelt
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The number one thing I tell newbies is to enjoy judo especially the BBJers who come in so intense. You are lucky to have us older guys who have trained for so many years and can teach you the basics for your development. My #1 concern is not to get you hurt so you stick with it. Fighting all out with no skills is useless. It own't take you far in the judo world.
11/22/11 8:59 AM
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Seong gyeong
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judoblackbelt - Yes, have fun in judo. When I see the BJJers coming to judo I see the seriousness on their faces and tell them to learn how to throw and receive throws and have fun. The other newbies are scared of judo a little. So theirs is boosting confidence so they stick with it. The BJJers are gamers and will stick with it no matter what, proven warriors.


This reminds me of a young guy who showed up to judo class with a Fedor shirt. This was back around 2006. He said he was there to learn judo because "Fedor does judo." He 100% had BJJ experience because I sort of interrogated him about it. After a few weeks, they let him participate in randori. He got paired up with the most frail, elderly man in our class and proceeded to attempt to rip the guy's arm off. Fortunately, there was some sort of divine intervention going on--or he just wasn't that good--because the old guy kept managing to wiggle his arm out of harm's way. The BJJer eventually got frustrated after a visiting group of Japanese high schoolers came and gave him a good ass-kicking. (Not a knock against BJJers; I started with BJJ myself and I respect the art.)
11/22/11 9:01 AM
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Seong gyeong
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Oh, and when I say "got frustrated," that is, he quit the school and was never seen again.
11/22/11 11:28 AM
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Outkaster
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I don't think there is anything wrong with community based martial arts. They are some of the better schools with kids that train hard.
12/4/11 2:35 AM
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Outis
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 Started at 54 with a little recreational BJJ experience, laid out a few years, then came back at 58 and after a year of practice competed as a master novice in the Houston Open Judo Tournament. The place where I started had a sprung floor, which made falls easier to take, but the place I train now doesn't. Breakfall practice is hell, but Ibuprofen is my friend.  

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