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7/4/12 12:37 AM
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Cryptic
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invalid - Ok, having read the thread I'm stuck between three choices.

Erikson
Cook
Abercrombie


Please keep in mind that while I've been a fan of the fantasy genre, I've never been a reader or it over general fiction. This would be my introduction to it since I read DragonLance as a teen

If this is your first fantasy book since DragonLance I'd go with Chris Bunch then onto Abercrombie.
7/5/12 1:12 PM
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invalid
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I already started Abercrombie - really liking it so far. I wasn't sure what to expect from pure writing aesthetic, but I have to say, this book has been a fun read.

The Bloody-Nine is a cool fucking character.

7/5/12 5:38 PM
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Diken Cider
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in
7/5/12 11:12 PM
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croaker
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You're asking for stuff to kind of ease into the dark fantasy genre after starting with the dragonlance stuff...hmmm

Dragonlance was pretty much stock characters and situations...very DandD like. Herioc guy this, thief that, paladin the other

I would NOT start with Erickson, then. Malazan will exhaust you. Early Cook is a good place to start: the Dread Empire series is where he starts the characters for the Black Company novels

There are certain authors that you can get short series from. Just look for most of the ones listed here
7/6/12 12:19 PM
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invalid
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Dudes, for the 3rd time now I picked up Abercrombie's series on Kindle and am halfway through the first book now. They didn't have Cook on Ipad or Kindle format (did find him through the publisher's site later), so I went with the less daunting start.

I actually am thinking about starting Erikson's work next though. The digital series on Amazon are only $2.99 each, so it's not like I'd be out if I find his style isn't for me.

I do, however, think I probably will like him. I love world building along with the fact that large volume doesn't bother me (my wheelhouse is early 19 century Russian lit... don't laugh)
7/6/12 12:22 PM
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Jobe Watson the Bomber
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soliak - Holy shit...thread into it's second page and still no mention of probably the best fantasy author - Raymond E Feist.

I highly suggest you read the Magician series, it is fantastic.
My god this. Magician is the greatest fantasy book ever. Period. Phone Post
7/6/12 1:08 PM
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UGCTT_Jay Edz
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Jobe Watson the Bomber -
soliak - Holy shit...thread into it's second page and still no mention of probably the best fantasy author - Raymond E Feist.

I highly suggest you read the Magician series, it is fantastic.
My god this. Magician is the greatest fantasy book ever. Period. Phone Post
Definitely my favourite Phone Post
7/6/12 1:10 PM
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Lymond
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invalid - Dudes, for the 3rd time now I picked up Abercrombie's series on Kindle and am halfway through the first book now. They didn't have Cook on Ipad or Kindle format (did find him through the publisher's site later), so I went with the less daunting start.

I actually am thinking about starting Erikson's work next though. The digital series on Amazon are only $2.99 each, so it's not like I'd be out if I find his style isn't for me.

I do, however, think I probably will like him. I love world building along with the fact that large volume doesn't bother me (my wheelhouse is early 19 century Russian lit... don't laugh)


World building is huge to me, and nobody does it better than Erikson. One of the main reasons I love Malazan.
7/6/12 1:33 PM
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Adventure Runner
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Ever read the Dune series? I know it's not typical fantasy, but it has a lot of similar elements.

Honestly, I HATED the Malazan, Black Company, and Shanara series. Totally different than Ice and Fire. Sword of Truth started good until the 4th book or so.
7/7/12 4:10 AM
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Amano Ginji
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In for later reading. Been reading old sci/fi recently (Uplift series by David Brin), and need a fantasy break. Phone Post
7/7/12 7:29 AM
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Thr33finger
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R. Scott Bakker. Solid younger Canadian author. Heavily influenced by erikson. He is currently 5 books in to his "world". The first three are the "prince nothing" series. Fucking amazing talent. The second set of books take place a couple years after the first 3. I haven't read the 4th or 5th book yet cuz the 6th isn't done. But I'm patiently waiting. Phone Post
7/8/12 3:45 AM
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MushroomHead
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800 pages into The Way of Kings and I got to say... This shit brilliant.

I find myself re-reading a lot of the conversations... Kaladin's conversations with Syl are great, I love the conversations between Shallan and Jasnah about theology, philosophy, morals, etc, all really good. I love any scene with Wit. The thing that made this book go from good to great was Kaladin's conversation with Wit, and the story Wit told.

It's not just the conversations that I enjoy. I like how things "come together" over a series of chapters in this book. Little seeds that are planted and slowly grow bit by bit.

Good stuff, good stuff. Phone Post
7/8/12 3:49 AM
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Caleb R
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Subbed for recommendations! Phone Post
7/8/12 4:00 AM
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LokiTheJester
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Sagiv Lapkin -  I'm gonna get flamed for this but......Sword of Truth series. I loved that shit.


I liked it at first, but then it gradually turned more and more into a romance novel with glorified sex scenes, you can just imagine the author spanking one out as hes writing it
7/8/12 6:36 AM
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hey mes
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Machine250 - Dave Duncan

The King's Blades series


The Gilded Chain(?) is probably my favorite fantasy book. I've read SOIF, Malazan, WoT series. But as a single book, gilded chain was the bomb.
7/8/12 7:05 AM
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aluminum_rooster
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Wow, seven pages and no one has mentioned the master:


ROGER ZELAZNY (who was also a multi-discipline martial artist)

The Amber Series.


Also by RZ-

'Lord of Light' (a single stand alone novel)

'Creatures of Light and Darkness' (single novel)


from wiki:

Characteristic themes

In his stories, Roger Zelazny frequently portrayed familiar-seeming worlds with plausible magic systems and/or casually supernatural beings. His novels and short stories often involve characters from myth, depicted in the modern world. Zelazny was also apt to include numerous anachronistic present-day elements, such as cigarette-smoking (see below) and references to various drama classics into his fantasy and science-fiction works. His crisp, minimalistic dialogue also seems to be somewhat influenced by the style of wisecracking hardboiled crime authors, such as Raymond Chandler or Dashiell Hammett. The tension between the ancient and the modern, surreal and familiar was what drove most of his work.

A very frequent motif in Zelazny's work is immortality or people who (have) become gods. The mythological traditions his fiction borrowed from include:

Classical Greek mythology, in ...And Call Me Conrad
Hindu mythology, in Lord of Light
Norse mythology, in The Mask of Loki
Psychoanalysis, in The Dream Master
Egyptian mythology in Creatures of Light and Darkness
Christian mythology, in the novelette A Rose for Ecclesiastes
Navajo mythology, in Eye of Cat
Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos (on a more humorous note) in A Night in the Lonesome October

Additionally, elements from Norse, Japanese and Irish mythology, Arthurian legend as well as several references to real history appear in his magnum opus, The Chronicles of Amber.

Aside from working with mythological themes, the most common recurring motif of Zelazny's is the "absent father" (or father-figure). Again, this occurs most notably in the Amber novels: in the first Amber series, the main protagonist Corwin searches for his lost, god-like father Oberon; while in the second series, which focuses on Corwin's son Merlin (not to be confused with the Arthurian Merlin!), it is Corwin himself who is strangely missing. This somewhat Freudian theme runs through almost every Zelazny novel to a smaller or larger degree. Roadmarks, Doorways in the Sand, Changeling, Madwand, A Dark Traveling; the short stories "Dismal Light", "Godson", "The Keys to December"; and the Alien Speedway series all feature main characters who are either searching for or have lost their fathers. Zelazny’s father, Joseph, died unexpectedly in 1962 and never knew his son’s successes as a writer; this event may have triggered Zelazny's unconscious and frequent use of the absent father motif.[6]

Two other personal characteristics that influenced his fiction were his expertise in martial arts and his addiction to tobacco. Zelazny became expert with the épée in college, and thus began a lifelong study of several different martial arts, including Karate, Judo, Aikido (which he later taught as well, having gained a black belt), T'ai Chi, Tae Kwon Do, Hapkido, Hsing I, and Pa Kua. In turn, many of his characters ably and knowledgeably use similar skills whilst dispatching their opponents. Zelazny was also a passionate cigarette and pipe smoker (until he quit in the early '80s), so much so, that he made many of his protagonists heavy smokers as well. However, he quit in order to improve his cardiovascular fitness for the martial arts; once he had quit, characters in his later novels and short stories stopped smoking too.

Another characteristic of Zelazny's writing is that many of his protagonists had sufficient familiarity with other languages to be able to quote French, German, Italian or Latin aphorisms when the occasion seemed appropriate (or even inappropriate), although Zelazny himself did not speak any of those languages.

He also often experimented with form in his stories. The novel Doorways in the Sand practices a flashback technique in which most chapters open with a scene, typically involving peril, not implied by the end of the previous chapter. Once the scene is established, the narrator backtracks to the events leading up to it, then follows through to the end of the chapter, whereupon the next chapter jumps ahead to another dramatic non-sequitur.

In Roadmarks, a novel about a road system that links all possible times, places and histories, the chapters that feature the main protagonist are all titled "One". Other chapters, titled "Two", feature secondary characters, including original characters, pulp heroes, and real historical characters. The "One" storyline is fairly linear, whereas the "Two" storyline jumps around in time and sequence. After finishing the manuscript, Zelazny shuffled the "Two" chapters randomly among the "One" chapters in order to emphasize their non-linear nature relative to the storyline.

Creatures of Light and Darkness, featuring characters in the personae of Egyptian gods, uses a narrative voice entirely in the present tense; the final chapter is structured as a play, and several chapters take the form of long poems.

Zelazny also tended to write a short fragment, not intended for publication, as a kind of backstory for a major character, as a way of giving that character a life independent of the particular novel being worked on. At least one "fragment" was published, the short story Dismal Light, originally a backstory for Isle of the Dead's Francis Sandow. Sandow himself figures little in Dismal Light, the main character being his son, who is delaying his escape from an unstable star system in order to force his distant father to come in and ask him personally. While Isle of the Dead has Sandow living a life of irresponsible luxury as an escape from his personal demons, "Dismal Light" anchors his character as one who will face up to his responsibilities, however reluctantly.

Another common stylistic approach in his novels is the use of mixed genres, whereby elements of each are combined freely and interchangeably. Jack of Shadows and Changeling, for example, revolve around the tensions between the two worlds of magic and technology. Lord of Light, perhaps one of his most famous works, is written in the classic style of a mythic fantasy, while it is established early in the book that the story itself takes place on a colonized planet.

Many of Zelazny's works explore variations upon the idea that if there exists an infinite number of worlds, then every world that can be imagined must exist, somewhere. Powerful beings in many of his stories have the ability to travel to worlds that possess precisely the characteristics which that being wishes to experience. (Zelazny characters with this ability include Thoth in Creatures of Light and Darkness, who teleports to these worlds; those with the royal blood of either Amber or Chaos in The Chronicles of Amber, who "move through shadows" to reach these worlds; and Red Dorakeen in Roadmarks, who reaches these worlds by driving along a magical highway.) Many of these same characters wonder whether they are creating these special places anew, or are merely finding places which already exist (very much like "the problem of universals" in classical metaphysics). Usually each character who ponders this ultimately decides that the question is purely academic and therefore unanswerable.
7/8/12 7:27 AM
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UGCTT_Jay Edz
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MushroomHead - 800 pages into The Way of Kings and I got to say... This shit brilliant.

I find myself re-reading a lot of the conversations... Kaladin's conversations with Syl are great, I love the conversations between Shallan and Jasnah about theology, philosophy, morals, etc, all really good. I love any scene with Wit. The thing that made this book go from good to great was Kaladin's conversation with Wit, and the story Wit told.

It's not just the conversations that I enjoy. I like how things "come together" over a series of chapters in this book. Little seeds that are planted and slowly grow bit by bit.

Good stuff, good stuff. Phone Post
Ya know the best thing about this? It's the first book of TEN. Phone Post
7/8/12 7:27 AM
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Dirtyu D
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I tried reading the amber series a few years ago and just couldn't get into. But as an author, I was never much of a fan of his work
7/8/12 7:33 AM
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BaldTony
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Edited: 07/08/12 7:39 AM
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I've just started on the Iron Druid series by Kevin Hearne. Only 3/4 through the first book, but it's good fun so far. Similar to the Dresden Files in setting(apparently).


http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9533378-hounded
7/8/12 7:40 AM
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cleophus
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Phone Post
7/8/12 7:52 AM
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Naheb
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phydeau - Modern fantasy:

Jim Butcher's Dresden Files. My favorite series right now. 13 books in the series so far. First book is Storm Front.

Kim Harrison's Hollows series. 10 books in the series so far. First book is Dead Witch Walking.
Struggled to get into it. Stopped halfway through the first book Phone Post
7/8/12 7:54 AM
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Naheb
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Steven brust jehreg/Taltos series is awesome Phone Post
7/8/12 7:56 AM
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Stavut
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As recommended earlier by Aschilles, David Gemmell would be a great choice. The legend series up to his Troy Trilogy are books any heroic fantasy reader should look up.
7/8/12 10:02 AM
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LgFriess
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7/8/12 2:29 PM
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MushroomHead
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UGCTT_Jay Edz -
MushroomHead - 800 pages into The Way of Kings and I got to say... This shit brilliant.

I find myself re-reading a lot of the conversations... Kaladin's conversations with Syl are great, I love the conversations between Shallan and Jasnah about theology, philosophy, morals, etc, all really good. I love any scene with Wit. The thing that made this book go from good to great was Kaladin's conversation with Wit, and the story Wit told.

It's not just the conversations that I enjoy. I like how things "come together" over a series of chapters in this book. Little seeds that are planted and slowly grow bit by bit.

Good stuff, good stuff. Phone Post
Ya know the best thing about this? It's the first book of TEN. Phone Post
Which will, unfortunately, likely be spread out over the next 20 years... Phone Post

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