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Training and Gear UnderGround >> Training In MMA - Tips?


8/27/12 2:38 AM
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Jacobb Garcia
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Member Since: 8/20/12
Posts: 8
 
I'm currently 16 years old and i began training a couple months ago. I began with BJJ and am starting to do more boxing and very basic Judo. I am crazy about training, if i even go a day without training i feel disappointed in myself and i get extremely bored with myself haha. I want to try and compete in MMA as soon as i feel ready just to see if i have what it takes to even compete, i figure i'll never know unless i try and i will never be 'ready' until i start. I'm just looking for some tips on how to go about training and any tips people think are relevant from a good diet and workouts to even some good places to find gear or what brands are recommended. I don't expect top of the line advice and coaching, just some friendly advice/tips :)
I've followed MMA for a long time now and i do a lot of reading and watching videos of fights, instructionals, stuff like that. Thanks to anybody who reads this and i look forward to hearing the advice! :)
Oh and if anybody was curious, i am training BJJ in sacramento at MMA Gracie Fighter
9/5/12 9:49 PM
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New2MMA
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Member Since: 4/13/03
Posts: 4235


Hey Jacobb,

First off, good luck in your endeavors in MMA. My only advice is to have fun, revisit and hone your basics constantly.

Safety in training: find smart training partners who you can trust to train 40, 50 and 60 percent.

Meatheads and dickheads in the gym injure people, and eventually they usually move on because they can't handle the discipline. Stay away from those guys, and don't get into pissing contests because someone tries to be a prick on the mat. Excuse yourself and let someone else deal with him.

Drill techniques over and over, and spar at moderate intensity for as many rounds possible, as often as possible. Remember that MMA, like straight boxing, is a skill set, and nothng takes the place of live training.

Find a quiet place and sit and visualize your training. Visualization is a powerful tool that many people don't use. Visualize yourself executing techniques perfectly over and over. It's an underrated training tool.

Remember to find balance in training. By balance I mean to listen to your body, schedule rest time when necessary, and complement your skill development with weight training. Use compound movements (squats, deadlifts, etc) and bodyweight exercises as the core of your workouts, and remember that these lifts are technical, so you want to have good coaching for them as well.

Yoga is a great complement to MMA. Hatha yoga is static, and vinyasa yoga is dynamic. I look to vinyasa movements for strength, and hatha movements for stretching and healing nagging injuries.

Recover completely when injured. Rest, ice, and strengthen the area with light weight through full range of motion when ready.

Diet is common sense for the most part. Pizza and Chinese food or chicken breast or fish, rice and steamed veggies? Eat enough protein to feed muscle, eat enough carbs for energy.

Drink lots of water and get your 8 hours of sleep.

Remember that you are in this to have fun. If it becomes stressful or too much of a chore, step back and remind yourself what you love about it. Training in martial arts is a lifelong endeavor. At 40 years old, with kids and after training for many years, I still feel that I've only scratched the surface, and I always feel a sense of humility for how much the people around me know.

Train consistently, train your mind as well as your body, remember to have fun, and stay safe. Good luck!
9/5/12 9:50 PM
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New2MMA
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Edited: 09/05/12 9:52 PM
Member Since: 4/13/03
Posts: 4236
One thing that I forgot to mention: one technique mastered is better than 100 half-learned. Keep the number of techniques low, especially at first, and aspire to master them through repetition and application. After you feel confident with them, string them in combination. Don't try to half-learn one technique to get to another.

Good luck.
9/12/12 1:25 AM
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EdgeHoboken
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New2MMA is spot on. Excellent write up.
9/16/12 10:19 PM
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Jacobb Garcia
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Member Since: 8/20/12
Posts: 18
New2MMA -

Hey Jacobb,

First off, good luck in your endeavors in MMA. My only advice is to have fun, revisit and hone your basics constantly.

Safety in training: find smart training partners who you can trust to train 40, 50 and 60 percent.

Meatheads and dickheads in the gym injure people, and eventually they usually move on because they can't handle the discipline. Stay away from those guys, and don't get into pissing contests because someone tries to be a prick on the mat. Excuse yourself and let someone else deal with him.

Drill techniques over and over, and spar at moderate intensity for as many rounds possible, as often as possible. Remember that MMA, like straight boxing, is a skill set, and nothng takes the place of live training.

Find a quiet place and sit and visualize your training. Visualization is a powerful tool that many people don't use. Visualize yourself executing techniques perfectly over and over. It's an underrated training tool.

Remember to find balance in training. By balance I mean to listen to your body, schedule rest time when necessary, and complement your skill development with weight training. Use compound movements (squats, deadlifts, etc) and bodyweight exercises as the core of your workouts, and remember that these lifts are technical, so you want to have good coaching for them as well.

Yoga is a great complement to MMA. Hatha yoga is static, and vinyasa yoga is dynamic. I look to vinyasa movements for strength, and hatha movements for stretching and healing nagging injuries.

Recover completely when injured. Rest, ice, and strengthen the area with light weight through full range of motion when ready.

Diet is common sense for the most part. Pizza and Chinese food or chicken breast or fish, rice and steamed veggies? Eat enough protein to feed muscle, eat enough carbs for energy.

Drink lots of water and get your 8 hours of sleep.

Remember that you are in this to have fun. If it becomes stressful or too much of a chore, step back and remind yourself what you love about it. Training in martial arts is a lifelong endeavor. At 40 years old, with kids and after training for many years, I still feel that I've only scratched the surface, and I always feel a sense of humility for how much the people around me know.

Train consistently, train your mind as well as your body, remember to have fun, and stay safe. Good luck!
Thank you so much for the reply. I really appreciate all the wisdom and help you have given. It seems like i'm on the right track based off the things you have said, i appreciate you taking the time to answer and i hope i can use this information in my daily training :) Phone Post
9/16/12 10:21 PM
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Jacobb Garcia
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Member Since: 8/20/12
Posts: 19
New2MMA -

Hey Jacobb,

First off, good luck in your endeavors in MMA. My only advice is to have fun, revisit and hone your basics constantly.

Safety in training: find smart training partners who you can trust to train 40, 50 and 60 percent.

Meatheads and dickheads in the gym injure people, and eventually they usually move on because they can't handle the discipline. Stay away from those guys, and don't get into pissing contests because someone tries to be a prick on the mat. Excuse yourself and let someone else deal with him.

Drill techniques over and over, and spar at moderate intensity for as many rounds possible, as often as possible. Remember that MMA, like straight boxing, is a skill set, and nothng takes the place of live training.

Find a quiet place and sit and visualize your training. Visualization is a powerful tool that many people don't use. Visualize yourself executing techniques perfectly over and over. It's an underrated training tool.

Remember to find balance in training. By balance I mean to listen to your body, schedule rest time when necessary, and complement your skill development with weight training. Use compound movements (squats, deadlifts, etc) and bodyweight exercises as the core of your workouts, and remember that these lifts are technical, so you want to have good coaching for them as well.

Yoga is a great complement to MMA. Hatha yoga is static, and vinyasa yoga is dynamic. I look to vinyasa movements for strength, and hatha movements for stretching and healing nagging injuries.

Recover completely when injured. Rest, ice, and strengthen the area with light weight through full range of motion when ready.

Diet is common sense for the most part. Pizza and Chinese food or chicken breast or fish, rice and steamed veggies? Eat enough protein to feed muscle, eat enough carbs for energy.

Drink lots of water and get your 8 hours of sleep.

Remember that you are in this to have fun. If it becomes stressful or too much of a chore, step back and remind yourself what you love about it. Training in martial arts is a lifelong endeavor. At 40 years old, with kids and after training for many years, I still feel that I've only scratched the surface, and I always feel a sense of humility for how much the people around me know.

Train consistently, train your mind as well as your body, remember to have fun, and stay safe. Good luck!
Oh and yeah i have had my experience with the meatheads in the gym but i just keep calm and respectful and normally beat them sparring Anyway haha Phone Post

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