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9/16/12 2:14 AM
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jman
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Edited: 09/16/12 2:14 AM
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Pretty cool video from Carl Verheyen. I think it's more about the concepts and applications, than the actual licks (so you can watch it in one sitting) damn this guy can burn:

9/16/12 8:28 PM
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hugomma
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Damn, that's a great video.  Verheyen's style reminds me of Scott Henderson.

Thanks again, jman.

9/16/12 8:28 PM
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hugomma
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Edited: 09/16/12 8:33 PM
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Double post.  Either way, here's a video where Carl explains his floating bridge set up.  I'm pretty sure Scott Henderson has the same set up.
 
9/16/12 10:14 PM
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jman
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Wow very cool, never ever thought of adjusting the springs unevenly like that, makes sense in a strange way wow!

His style kind of reminds me of a fusion version of Eric Johnson. The interesting thing I got from his playing and videos, is that he uses wide intervals a lot, but many of his improvisations ues primarily the pentatonic played quite quickly (ala Eric Johnson) unless my ears are off. Not saying he does it all the time, just was interesting to see.

I think it has more to say about the penatonic scale and how "natural" it is to use (especially with rock guitar) even when you have the modes, scales, arpeggios, etc...the pentatonic scales still seems to be the almightly "meat and potatos" of rock guitar.

Nothing new to most people, but funny to come back full circle and revist it again after years of working on so many other scales.
9/17/12 11:25 AM
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hugomma
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jman - Wow very cool, never ever thought of adjusting the springs unevenly like that, makes sense in a strange way wow!

His style kind of reminds me of a fusion version of Eric Johnson. The interesting thing I got from his playing and videos, is that he uses wide intervals a lot, but many of his improvisations ues primarily the pentatonic played quite quickly (ala Eric Johnson) unless my ears are off. Not saying he does it all the time, just was interesting to see.

I think it has more to say about the penatonic scale and how "natural" it is to use (especially with rock guitar) even when you have the modes, scales, arpeggios, etc...the pentatonic scales still seems to be the almightly "meat and potatos" of rock guitar.

Nothing new to most people, but funny to come back full circle and revist it again after years of working on so many other scales.

I think you're right.  Petatonics are vastly underrated.  I posted this on your Steve Vai thread, but if you haven't seen it, it's worth checking out.  Henderson gets tons of mileage out of applying the classic minor petatonic shape to different intervals.  The chord extentsions you create sound very modern & give you a great "outside" sound.

FRAT WARNING: 

I only watched the 1st few minutes, but Carl's video looked great.  The way he talked about intervals & building lines really struck a chord (yeah, pun intended).  I seems like the direction Dale Bruing is talking me in, but way more advanced than what we covered.

I'm gonna post more details later, but Dale Bruning had me working off of intervals/chord tones in our first lesson.  I played a chord melody version of "Autum Leaves" I found online, and Mr. Bruning had me reverse engineer the tune.  He had me name the chord tones that were in the melody, and then instructed me to play the harmonic rhythm with just 1's, 3's, 5's, & 7's of each chord.  Then I'm supposed to pair up intervals with 3's and 7's,  and work from there, which I'll cover in more detail another thread.

The minor pentatonic mode (& all the modes of the pentatonics) have 7th arpeggios built into the fingerings.  I think the trick is to know where the chord tones are & to use petatonic fingering to bulid lines off of.  And if you add the flat 5 & turn those pentatonics into blues scales, you can create some hip sounding lines.  Apply some interval skips & major modes to those chord tones, & you're really on to something.  

The rabbit hole seems starts to look like a bottomless pit of different intervals and modes.

 


9/17/12 2:15 PM
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jman
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Cool let me know how the Autumn Leaves harmonizations go.

I've experimented for a while with playing the penatonic a fifth higher (like playing F# Minor Pentatonic over B Minor). But I never tried the C# Pentatonic over the B minor. I guess one reason is that it has to be Dorian when you used the C# (because of the G#) where with the F# Minor Pentatonic (superimposing a 5th higher) will work over both Dorian, Aeolian and also even Mixolyidian (playing F# Minor Pentatonic over a B7 works beautifully).

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