UnderGround Forums
 

S&C UnderGround >> Lifting weights for 12 year old?


10/3/12 2:49 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Chocolate Shatner
69 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 31851
Squatdog - Back on the shelf?

riiiight. I'm sure the shelf was "in the closet" as well.
10/3/12 2:53 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Chocolate Shatner
69 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 31852
oh, BTW, for those trying to find the studies about children and weightlifting, here's the NY Times article:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/24/phys-ed-the-benefits-of-weight-training-for-kids/

There's a few links in there, from those who show that kids don't get injured, to those that show that in fact resistance training for kids actually decreases chance of injury.
10/3/12 3:14 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Spartan79
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/11
Posts: 663
Leigh - Well, he says specifically that he wants to bulk up. Bodyweight exercises will not do that. Don't you remember being fed that lie as a kid? "Weights will make you slow. Stick to push ups and pull ups." Yeah except I could do over 20 pull ups and 50 pushups when I was 12, plus probably a thousand squats. Funnily enough, I was still very small.

I'm not sure what stress you think will be put on a 12 year old's muscles, tendons and ligaments with sensible weight training. As I stated earlier, there is no difference between a fat kid doing bodyweight exercises and a skinny kid using weights, except weights give you more control over your program. And its not like he's going to start off with a 400lb deadlift. How much stress do you think jumping off the climbing frame and playing pee football puts on the body?
I asked so you want to bulk??? Then this was the reply . Phone Post
10/3/12 3:14 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Spartan79
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/11
Posts: 664
MattB ATC - GSDFan,

No need to apologize. You never once used the word bulk in your previous posts. To directly quote your first post you stated:
"My son is 12 and, although very athletic, is also very small. He's starting Pee Wee football and I'd like to get him putting on some muscle and strength as right now he is just simply too small to be very effective."

Spartan started his argument stating his opposition to weight training, and then his focused changed to "bulk", which I am assuming he did after he realized that his argument against a youth weight training was lacking.

I will say that it is possible to get stronger without adding size, but the protective qualities of additional hypertrophy/muscle mass are very beneficial for football players, even at a young age. No need to forcefully try to add on too much mass too quickly, which from your last post you aren't trying to force. But if he easily adds on weight/size, don't be alarmed as at that young age growth spurts can be common and the weight training will only supplement the natural growing that is occurring.
Read posts mate ;-) Phone Post
10/3/12 3:30 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Spartan79
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/11
Posts: 665
Spartan started his argument stating his opposition to weight training, and then his focused changed to "bulk", which I am assuming he did after he realized that his argument against a youth weight training was lacking.

Wrong! Read posts . Focused changed to Bulk after I asked so you want to Bulk the kid and was told yes.
Question: if you don't want to bulk why not just use Bodyweight to strengthen the Body? Or can you not strengthen the body from Bodyweight exercises ? It's just been my option from the start. Nothing more.
Then all the buddies start coming out with ridiculous statements about things they have no clue. Or just don't read the whole thread and try to make out I've said things I've not just because I disagreed with their buddy Lol! Enough said on this , I wish the dad and his boy well. Phone Post
10/3/12 3:54 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Leigh
624 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 30377
No, asking a question to clarify means you're a flid dick head spec savers.

Just go home. You're an uneducated turd who has no clue on how to analyse. Go back to getting your information from myths and old wives' tales. Here is some free workout advice - getting squatting to help with your jumping.......to incorrect conclusions. Phone Post
10/3/12 6:19 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Squatdog
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 41456
Chocolate Shatner - 
Squatdog - Back on the shelf?

riiiight. I'm sure the shelf was "in the closet" as well.

I thought fat people were supposed to be jolly?


Just go home. You're an uneducated turd who has no clue on how to analyse. Go back to getting your information from myths and old wives' tales. Here is some free workout advice - getting squatting to help with your jumping.......to incorrect conclusions.


This.

There's nothing wrong with moderate weight-training for a 12-year old and the only people saying different are parroting a mixture of ignorance and bro science.
10/3/12 3:11 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Bull_in_chinashop
43 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 39467

Just happened to be surfing Reddit and I stumbled across this quote from Mark Rippetoe

"Kids can lift safely at any age if technique is correct, and has been addressed in all of my books. I feel that childhood should be enjoyed, and a father that forces a kid to lift weights is as bad as a father that forces a kid to play football. Children are not here for us to live vicariously through. Let them train if they perceive it as fun, and make them do the movements correctly. When they want to stop, let them stop."

10/3/12 4:51 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
None So Blind
175 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 14549
Weights hurt kids and slow their development? I wonder where they get all those 6'7 350 pound Nebraska linemen that have been baling hay and other unbelievably rigorous shit on the farm since age 4 :-P

And to clarify Rip's quote above - he means LITTLE kids, like 8 or 9 - if you're 14 or so and trying for junior varsity football, go nuts on the weights.

Here's his quote from the book:

A whole lot of people are under the erroneous impression that weight training is harmful for younger athletes, specifically the pre-pubescent population. Pediatricians are a wonderful group of people on the whole, but very often they are woefully uninformed regarding the data pertaining to the injury rates of various sports activities. They are also reluctant to apply some basic logic to an analysis of those numbers.

The table below lists the injury rates of various sports. Note that organized weightlifting activities, at 0.0012 injuries per 100 participation hours is about 5100 times safer than everyone's favorite organized children's sport, soccer, at 6.2 injuries per 100 player hours. Gym class, at 0.18, is more dangerous than supervised weight training. Yet even at this late date it is common for medical
professionals to advise against weight training for kids. The most cursory glance at the actual data renders this recommendation foolishness.

So why does this mythology persist, and how did it get started? Most often cited as the primary concern is the chance of epiphyseal, or growth plate, fracture, leading to growth asymmetry in the affected appendage. The entire body of the sports medicine literature contains six reports of growth plate fracture in kids associated with weight training, none of which was specific enough in detail to
determine whether the injury occurred under the bar (or if there even was a bar), if it occurred as the result of a fall due to faulty technique or improper instruction, or as the result of injudicious loading. And even in these six isolated examples, not one subsequently displayed any long-term effects that would indicate that a growth plate injury does not heal just like any other injury. The most intensely lame argument of all is that weight training stunts a kid's growth. But hauling hay does not? Such nonsense is not really worthy of response.

Here's the bottom line: weight training is precisely scalable to the ability of the individual lifter
Soccer is not. We have 11 lb. bars - or even broomsticks - for kids to start lifting with, but a full-speed
collision on the field with another 80 lb. kid is an inherently unscalable event. This logic also applies to
every group of people that might be viewed as a "special population" - the frail elderly, people with
skeletal and muscular disease, the completely sedentary, the morbidly obese, and the lazy (sorry,
couldn't resist). Note that women are not listed as a special population: they are half of the population.
Anyone who claims that women are sufficiently different in terms of physiologic response to exercise
that the principles of basic barbell training do not apply to them is thinking either irrationally or
commercially. In fact, the adaptation to weight training is precisely the adaptation that these special
populations need, and unless they are also cardiac patients aerobic-type long slow distance exercise is
only a tiny bit more useful than playing chess.

Reply Post

You must log in to post a reply. Click here to login.