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S&C UnderGround >> Hannibal for King trains MMA fighters


10/21/12 10:05 PM
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Lord Kancho
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Well, more like he does a demo for Rashad Evans, Tyron Spong and Alistair Overeem (who try to duplicate his feats).

I think just about everyone here who almost shit their pants when they saw this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfsTKfUT-RQ

would like to seem him hang with some MMA guys:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=eNkIgWEZvDc

It was cool to see him stand next to Rashad because I could finally get an idea of how small he is (since, you know, big people don't usually excel at bodyweight stuff -- unless you're these guys https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bem94m5WbGU or this 6'x5" 255lbs motherfucker https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIbpYQPFrEM).

Fun to see two disparate interests mix... but then Rashad was also into Jailhouse Rock for awhile, so he's open to anything which may offer him an extra edge.
10/22/12 9:28 AM
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vermonter
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Thanks for that. Rashad is a muscular dude, but not particularly tall so it was very interesting seeing how little Hannibal is.

And funny seeing overeem trying to do a muscleup haha.
10/23/12 2:13 PM
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Taku
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He is shorter than those guys...But he certainly does not look small.

TAKU

10/24/12 2:29 AM
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WillyMaunawili
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That was GREAT!

As someone who's trying to up his bar work(lol), that was VERY motivating.

Thanks for that Phone Post
10/24/12 5:34 PM
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Adventure Runner
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Thanks for sharing! I absolutely love watching that dude do his thing. It's impressive as hell with him being untrained, but his strength levels are pretty common for beginner-intermediate level gymnasts. If you're interested in that type of training, I'd highly recommend checking out an adult gymnastics program or picking up a book like Coach Sommer's "Building an Olympic Body", which is a detailed explanation of gymnastics training.

It beats just trying to muscle through things and instead focuses on a tiered, systematic approach to the skills and strength needed to perform a lot of bodyweight strength moves. They do some sick things.

Just typical high level kids training:

Maltese to Iron Cross (in the vid Hannibel can't pull off a legit IC): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PlwROM5BmSc

Mannas (insane strength here): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Je4Www3XiYQ

Reverse Muscle Up: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVsS7j2exx4

10/24/12 8:31 PM
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NeoSpartan
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With respect to Coach Sommers his book is very low on detail, progression, scheduling, and it really doesn't even list that many skills. It doesn't cover much on flexibility or anything else required to achieve most of the positions (no bridge from tuck to L for instance). I learned much more about his progressive system (steady state cycle) from his forums rather than the book which has all of 3-4 pages on it. Not a slight at him in any sense, because Coach Sommers is a treasure of the s&c and gymnastics community, but simply put: his book is woefully inadequate. I think it was rushed or just not thought out fully because a lot of his coaching seems to be intuitive to him.

There is another book, "Overcoming Gravity" By Steven Low. It's like comparing a coloring book to an engineering text. I recommend that anyone serious about bodyweight training in a gymnastics fashion pick up this book.











* and not to be weird but its much easier to carry around a book with a bunch of diagrams and stick figures in it than a book with a bunch of pictures of 1/2 naked flexible little boys.
10/24/12 9:07 PM
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Adventure Runner
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NeoSpartan - With respect to Coach Sommers his book is very low on detail, progression, scheduling, and it really doesn't even list that many skills. It doesn't cover much on flexibility or anything else required to achieve most of the positions (no bridge from tuck to L for instance). I learned much more about his progressive system (steady state cycle) from his forums rather than the book which has all of 3-4 pages on it. Not a slight at him in any sense, because Coach Sommers is a treasure of the s&c and gymnastics community, but simply put: his book is woefully inadequate. I think it was rushed or just not thought out fully because a lot of his coaching seems to be intuitive to him.

There is another book, "Overcoming Gravity" By Steven Low. It's like comparing a coloring book to an engineering text. I recommend that anyone serious about bodyweight training in a gymnastics fashion pick up this book.











* and not to be weird but its much easier to carry around a book with a bunch of diagrams and stick figures in it than a book with a bunch of pictures of 1/2 naked flexible little boys.

Haha! I totally hear you. Nevermind the cover is a picture of some dude's torso. I always make sure it is not visible. :)

I agree with the criticism. Over time, I just confuse what I learned on his forums with what's in the book. That said, the book has a very large number of progressions. You just need to hit the forums to learn how to put it all together. I've heard Low's book brought up before. I'll have to snag it.
10/26/12 5:45 AM
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PoundforPound
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Edited: 10/26/12 5:46 AM
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The cool thing about Hannibal for King is that he proves you don't need any books or special progressions. Just desire and a work ethic.
10/26/12 12:59 PM
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neongreenlights
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Adventure Runner - 
NeoSpartan - With respect to Coach Sommers his book is very low on detail, progression, scheduling, and it really doesn't even list that many skills. It doesn't cover much on flexibility or anything else required to achieve most of the positions (no bridge from tuck to L for instance). I learned much more about his progressive system (steady state cycle) from his forums rather than the book which has all of 3-4 pages on it. Not a slight at him in any sense, because Coach Sommers is a treasure of the s&c and gymnastics community, but simply put: his book is woefully inadequate. I think it was rushed or just not thought out fully because a lot of his coaching seems to be intuitive to him.

There is another book, "Overcoming Gravity" By Steven Low. It's like comparing a coloring book to an engineering text. I recommend that anyone serious about bodyweight training in a gymnastics fashion pick up this book.











* and not to be weird but its much easier to carry around a book with a bunch of diagrams and stick figures in it than a book with a bunch of pictures of 1/2 naked flexible little boys.

Haha! I totally hear you. Nevermind the cover is a picture of some dude's torso. I always make sure it is not visible. :)

I agree with the criticism. Over time, I just confuse what I learned on his forums with what's in the book. That said, the book has a very large number of progressions. You just need to hit the forums to learn how to put it all together. I've heard Low's book brought up before. I'll have to snag it.

Agree 100% Might have to get Low's book
10/26/12 1:42 PM
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Out To Lunch
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Low's book looks good, but it is expensive as HELL!!
10/27/12 2:13 AM
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WillyMaunawili
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Thanks for the book recommendations guys.

Anyone check out "You Are Your Own Gym", "Never Gymless", or "Convict Conditioning"? Phone Post
10/27/12 11:24 AM
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Adventure Runner
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WillyMaunawili -  Thanks for the book recommendations guys.

Anyone check out "You Are Your Own Gym", "Never Gymless", or "Convict Conditioning"? Phone Post

I have Never Gymless and Convict Conditioning (I almost wrote Combat Conditioning and shamefully have the book/VHS set of that too lol ) It's really apples and oranges compared to this stuff.

Never Gymless is more a general athletic training peice with ways to train strength using typical exercises and conditioning. It's a good book, but it's not something that teaches you gymnast strength or programming.

Convict Conditioning focuses on a handful of exercises for strength and skill in those exercises. It actually is kind of cool from a progression point of view since the progressions and programming are very systemic and easy to follow. Still you are only working up to things like a back bridge, one armed pushup, one legged squat, etc.

That's very different than the Building a Gymnastic Body book, video, and forum combo. These specifically teach you gymnastic strength and conditioning moves, progressions to learn them, and a way to program them. Like with anything else, you'll have much more progress when you specialize rather than the "try to mash everything into a single routine approach". This is a gymnastics specialization program.

I don't have You Are Your Own Gym.
10/27/12 9:37 PM
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WillyMaunawili
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Thanks AR Phone Post
10/28/12 3:51 AM
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Squatdog
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vermonter - Thanks for that. Rashad is a muscular dude, but not particularly tall so it was very interesting seeing how little Hannibal is.

And funny seeing overeem trying to do a muscleup haha.

No surprise AT ALL.

It was always hilarious watching the OG Negrophile brigade rave over this guy, while ripping on Olympic gymnasts as being tiny Cracka bitches.
10/30/12 4:39 PM
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Lord Kancho
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Never Gymless - I don't specifically recall what separates it from his other books, but I don't really follow any of his books so I wouldn't recommend it.

Convict Conditioning - great book, excellent progressions, something that has been needed for a very long time.

Building the Gymnastic Body - okay book. Shows you the moves and some progressions, but is pretty worthless in terms of programming. You need to be on his forums and even then Sommers doesn't lay anything out for you: it's forum members describing what worked for them (ie. Killroy) or telling you to scale down the WODs.

Overcoming Gravity - spectacular book. On par with the best books I've ever read for strength and hypertrophy training, equally applicable to bodyweight or barbell work. Excellent progressions laid out so you merely have to choose your goals and follow the right path. It also covers EVERYTHING - from mobility work to rehab/prehab for the entire body. (The strength portion of his book only covers the upper body. For the lower body he just tells you to go and squat or deadlift, something I think will earn approving nods from everyone here.)

Gymnastics work is somewhat difficult for larger guys to get into. This is where Convict Conditioning is invaluable. I think it's a perfect stepping stone to Overcoming Gravity or Building the Gymnastic Body.

10/30/12 6:51 PM
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PoundforPound
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Edited: 10/30/12 7:08 PM
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Squatdog -
vermonter - Thanks for that. Rashad is a muscular dude, but not particularly tall so it was very interesting seeing how little Hannibal is.

And funny seeing overeem trying to do a muscleup haha.


No surprise AT ALL.

It was always hilarious watching the OG Negrophile brigade rave over this guy, while ripping on Olympic gymnasts as being tiny Cracka bitches.


One doesn't have to be a "Negrophile" to have respect for Hannibal and the things he can do. Is that why gymnasts were even brought up in this thread? Because they are white and he happens to be black?

And speaking of size...aren't you a bit of a dwarf yourself?
10/31/12 1:10 AM
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Squatdog
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It's one thing to respect Hannibal's ability and that he's managed to market himself, but this guy gets endlessly raved over on the OG and every time gymnasts are brought up as comparison, they're dismissed as tiny Cracka bitches.

...except this guy is probably 5'5 and 80kg soaking wet.
10/31/12 7:56 AM
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Adventure Runner
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Lord Kancho - Never Gymless - I don't specifically recall what separates it from his other books, but I don't really follow any of his books so I wouldn't recommend it.

Convict Conditioning - great book, excellent progressions, something that has been needed for a very long time.

Building the Gymnastic Body - okay book. Shows you the moves and some progressions, but is pretty worthless in terms of programming. You need to be on his forums and even then Sommers doesn't lay anything out for you: it's forum members describing what worked for them (ie. Killroy) or telling you to scale down the WODs.

Overcoming Gravity - spectacular book. On par with the best books I've ever read for strength and hypertrophy training, equally applicable to bodyweight or barbell work. Excellent progressions laid out so you merely have to choose your goals and follow the right path. It also covers EVERYTHING - from mobility work to rehab/prehab for the entire body. (The strength portion of his book only covers the upper body. For the lower body he just tells you to go and squat or deadlift, something I think will earn approving nods from everyone here.)

Gymnastics work is somewhat difficult for larger guys to get into. This is where Convict Conditioning is invaluable. I think it's a perfect stepping stone to Overcoming Gravity or Building the Gymnastic Body.


Just a couple things to add.

Never Gymless - The thing that sets it apart is the programming. That is really what makes Ross books worth it to people is the way he shows how to concurrently program strength, endurance, and conditioning training in a multi-faceted approach. Not saying it's a must-have or must-do, but that's my take on why it's popular and what sets it apart.

Building the Gymnastic Body - Some progressions? It has at least 3x the progressions as Convict Conditioning (planche progressions, bar dip progressions, ring dip progressions, ring pushup progressions, l-sit/v-sit progressions, mana progressions, back lever progressions, front lever progressions, squat progressions, side lever progressions, multiplane pull progressions, push/pull combo progressions, and a lot more). Convict Conditioning has 6 progressions if I remember correctly. You are correct on the programming although I believe the steady state cycle is covered in it, but most of the good stuff on the forum is from the Gymnastic Bodies seminar attendees and not stuff dudes just discovered worked.

My $.02.
10/31/12 8:29 AM
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Lord Kancho
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Adventure Runner - 
Lord Kancho - Never Gymless - I don't specifically recall what separates it from his other books, but I don't really follow any of his books so I wouldn't recommend it.

Convict Conditioning - great book, excellent progressions, something that has been needed for a very long time.

Building the Gymnastic Body - okay book. Shows you the moves and some progressions, but is pretty worthless in terms of programming. You need to be on his forums and even then Sommers doesn't lay anything out for you: it's forum members describing what worked for them (ie. Killroy) or telling you to scale down the WODs.

Overcoming Gravity - spectacular book. On par with the best books I've ever read for strength and hypertrophy training, equally applicable to bodyweight or barbell work. Excellent progressions laid out so you merely have to choose your goals and follow the right path. It also covers EVERYTHING - from mobility work to rehab/prehab for the entire body. (The strength portion of his book only covers the upper body. For the lower body he just tells you to go and squat or deadlift, something I think will earn approving nods from everyone here.)

Gymnastics work is somewhat difficult for larger guys to get into. This is where Convict Conditioning is invaluable. I think it's a perfect stepping stone to Overcoming Gravity or Building the Gymnastic Body.


Just a couple things to add.

Never Gymless - The thing that sets it apart is the programming. That is really what makes Ross books worth it to people is the way he shows how to concurrently program strength, endurance, and conditioning training in a multi-faceted approach. Not saying it's a must-have or must-do, but that's my take on why it's popular and what sets it apart.

Building the Gymnastic Body - Some progressions? It has at least 3x the progressions as Convict Conditioning (planche progressions, bar dip progressions, ring dip progressions, ring pushup progressions, l-sit/v-sit progressions, mana progressions, back lever progressions, front lever progressions, squat progressions, side lever progressions, multiplane pull progressions, push/pull combo progressions, and a lot more). Convict Conditioning has 6 progressions if I remember correctly. You are correct on the programming although I believe the steady state cycle is covered in it, but most of the good stuff on the forum is from the Gymnastic Bodies seminar attendees and not stuff dudes just discovered worked.

My $.02.

"You are correct on the programming although I believe the steady state cycle is covered in it, but most of the good stuff on the forum is from the Gymnastic Bodies seminar attendees and not stuff dudes just discovered worked. "

I never ventured past the newb section of his forum, but "dudes discovering what worked" and dudes scaling down the WOD was my impression of it. If you look at what they stickied for newbs, it doesn't involve the book very much.
10/31/12 10:04 AM
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Adventure Runner
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Don't know what to say. I never really cared much about the WOD's, so I never ventured into threads about them. If you look at any of the programming stickies and threads, it is all basically stuff directly from the seminars about what base routines should be, what order progressions need to be started in, prerequisites before starting progressions (eg bar dips before ring dips > 60 second german hang before trying back lever progressions > etc), how to program everything together, etc.
10/31/12 7:58 PM
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Lord Kancho
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Adventure Runner - Don't know what to say. I never really cared much about the WOD's, so I never ventured into threads about them. If you look at any of the programming stickies and threads, it is all basically stuff directly from the seminars about what base routines should be, what order progressions need to be started in, prerequisites before starting progressions (eg bar dips before ring dips > 60 second german hang before trying back lever progressions > etc), how to program everything together, etc.

OK. When I read those I never understood them to be info from the seminars. I interpreted it as people sharing their experiences.

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