UnderGround Forums
 

BJJGround Forum >> First time BJJ comp in 3 weeks. How to prepare?


10/22/12 5:46 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
mister_sticks
13 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 12/1/10
Posts: 882
 
I am throwing my hat in the ring and competing for the first time at a BJJ comp in three weeks' time as a blue belt. I have never competed before in BJJ so would appreciate any recommendation on how to make the best use of the time I have in preparing for the comp. Phone Post
10/22/12 8:22 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
poober
4 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 3/11/07
Posts: 2134
It's hard to prepare yourself for the first tournament IMHO. You don't know exactly how you'll react and what the comp itself will do to your intensity levels. Use it as a learning experience, since there are too many variables that could cause you to have a weaker showing than you know you're capable of.

If you're in great shape work on going above your comfortable intensity levels during training and push yourself harder than you're used to. It's hard to simulate adrenaline though. =)
10/22/12 10:09 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
rickson_basics
1 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 7/6/11
Posts: 65
As much as it sucks to hear, the best way to optimize your performance also comes with experience. You need to RELAX...endeavor to try to emulate how you roll in the gym.

You're already going to have your adrenaline pumping, so no need to get into a pumped up rage before going out. As impossible as it may be, just try to (forgive me) "flow with the go". You should be pretty comfortable in every position, as a blue, so trust ur training and just relax. Phone Post
10/22/12 10:36 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Easytarget
44 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 3/1/03
Posts: 3319
One thing a lot of people find different, difficult and taxing is the standing grappling. If you start on your knees at your club and have no judo/wrestling exp , or even experience pulling guard, i would do rounds of that after class for say 3 mins.

Also don't try new moves sparring at your club, just work on your sweeps and subs that work for you. Knowing what you want to do from basic positions keeps you calmer IME.

And drill some escapes, mount, side control etc. So you can work efficiently form there.

Good luck.
10/23/12 1:26 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
one eye wonder
1 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 9/9/08
Posts: 109
have fun and learn something from it. try to do tournament style rolling in class. I agree with rickson_basics, you can't replace experience. Listen to you coach and try to block everything else out.
10/23/12 4:47 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
GayGuardMooseSaucy
479 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 2/4/11
Posts: 8088
Cardio Phone Post
10/23/12 6:04 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
rickson_basics
1 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 7/6/11
Posts: 66
Oh and have fun for shit's sake. Nothing worse than being scared of pulling guard and standing the whole fight, just to win by a judges decision or takedown points.

Playing not to lose sucks and it isn't fun. Unless your in a major event, just try to have fun. Phone Post
10/23/12 9:31 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Rival School
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/11/11
Posts: 2711
Fist tournament I expected the worse so I had a don't give a shit attitude and got double gold. Then went to one where i cared so much and adrenaline dumped before I rolled and got crushed. Point is chill as much as possible Phone Post
10/23/12 9:47 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Rival School
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/11/11
Posts: 2712
Fisting tournament just to be clear Phone Post
10/23/12 2:37 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
shen
822 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 10/23/12 8:04 PM
Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 18822


Look, I know it may not be easy or what you want to hear, but the truth is you NEED to find a way to get to some fresh snow...

You need to train in that snow chopping wood, carrying tree trunks and pulling a dog sled.

That is the only thing that will truly prepare you.
10/24/12 4:22 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
mister_sticks
13 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 12/1/10
Posts: 887
I rolled yesterday with a regular partner who just competed last Saturday and asked to simulate a competition roll.

I got bulldozed. Couldn't match his speed and pressure. I just realised that rolling in a class is WAY different than in comps.

I have always played a defensive game but after that I felt I neede to change my midset into attack mode. Phone Post
10/24/12 7:06 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Graugart
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 1/1/01
Posts: 497
Competing IS your preparation for competition :) Phone Post
10/24/12 1:27 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
billygamble
1 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 9/27/07
Posts: 532
just have fun and try to stay on top at all costs. Get it on video because you might not remember much.
10/24/12 1:30 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
aed333
4 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 9/22/10
Posts: 8
Competing in your first tournament will feel completely different from anything you've ever felt before in training, so be prepared to be, and feel, completely unprepared.
10/24/12 4:20 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
mister_sticks
13 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 12/1/10
Posts: 891
Graugart - Competing IS your preparation for competition :) Phone Post
Thanks. I saw your matches last Saturday against two of my instructors. Well done and congratulations! Phone Post
10/26/12 12:07 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
redenstein
5 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 5/28/07
Posts: 236
Have a game plan. I repeat, have a game plan. Are you going to pull guard, going for a takedown? If so are you pulling to full guard, to lasso, to spider? What takedown are you going for, double leg, single?

I would ask a higher belt that competes a lot to help you set that up. Hopefully he can be there to coach you too.

Before you step on the mat, visualize the match going exactly the way you want it to. From stepping out onto the mat and shaking hands to you winning via submission. Also visualize it going awful, like you getting mounted or your opponent takes your back. Then see yourself getting out of those bad positions.

Like everyone else has said, HAVE FUN! And no matter what happens, win or lose, compete again within a months time. Good luck!
10/26/12 7:37 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
mister_sticks
13 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 12/1/10
Posts: 893
redenstein - Have a game plan. I repeat, have a game plan. Are you going to pull guard, going for a takedown? If so are you pulling to full guard, to lasso, to spider? What takedown are you going for, double leg, single?

I would ask a higher belt that competes a lot to help you set that up. Hopefully he can be there to coach you too.

Before you step on the mat, visualize the match going exactly the way you want it to. From stepping out onto the mat and shaking hands to you winning via submission. Also visualize it going awful, like you getting mounted or your opponent takes your back. Then see yourself getting out of those bad positions.

Like everyone else has said, HAVE FUN! And no matter what happens, win or lose, compete again within a months time. Good luck!
Thanks. I think having a gameplan is the way to go. I have started spider mapping techniques (passes and submissions) from different positions.
I need to work on attacking and playing the aggressive game, though. I believe that having this offense-driven style could put my opponent on his back foot and defend rather than attack.
The thing is, I am finding it slightly difficult to turn my aggression switch on... Phone Post
10/27/12 2:41 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
redenstein
5 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Member Since: 5/28/07
Posts: 237
mister_sticks - 
redenstein - Have a game plan. I repeat, have a game plan. Are you going to pull guard, going for a takedown? If so are you pulling to full guard, to lasso, to spider? What takedown are you going for, double leg, single?

I would ask a higher belt that competes a lot to help you set that up. Hopefully he can be there to coach you too.

Before you step on the mat, visualize the match going exactly the way you want it to. From stepping out onto the mat and shaking hands to you winning via submission. Also visualize it going awful, like you getting mounted or your opponent takes your back. Then see yourself getting out of those bad positions.

Like everyone else has said, HAVE FUN! And no matter what happens, win or lose, compete again within a months time. Good luck!
Thanks. I think having a gameplan is the way to go. I have started spider mapping techniques (passes and submissions) from different positions.
I need to work on attacking and playing the aggressive game, though. I believe that having this offense-driven style could put my opponent on his back foot and defend rather than attack.
The thing is, I am finding it slightly difficult to turn my aggression switch on... Phone Post

I wouldn't worry about "turning my aggression switch on." Don't think "I have to be aggressive, I have to be aggressive." Thinking like this will put too much pressure on you.

Be confident in your game plan that you have worked out. Opportunities will present themselves in the matches, just be ready to take advantage of them. Stay focused and listen to your coach.

You have 3 weeks or so to prepare. If you use that time focusing on your game plan and having tough but safe rolls, you'll do great. I always take at least one private from a higher belt that is a competitor at my school before the tournament. It's been worth the money every time.

Reply Post

You must log in to post a reply. Click here to login.